Favorite Overall Trek Series/Movie  

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  1. 1. What is your overall favorite Star Trek series?

    • Star Trek: Enterprise
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    • Star Trek: The Original Series
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    • Star Trek: The Animated Series
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    • Star Trek: The Next Generation
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    • Star Trek: Voyager
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  2. 2. What is your overall favorite Star Trek movie?

    • Star Trek - I: The Motion Picture
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    • Star Trek - II: The Wrath of Khan
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    • Star Trek - III: The Search for Spock
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    • Star Trek - VII: Generations
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    • Star Trek - VIII: First Contact
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    • Star Trek - IX: Insurrection
      6
    • Star Trek - X: Nemesis
      10


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Title: Tuvix

Episode: Season 2, Episode 24

TELEPLAY BY: Kenneth Biller

STORY BY: Andrew Price and Mark Gaberman

DIRECTED BY: Cliff Bole

First Aired: May 6, 1996

Stardate: 49655.2

SUMMARY:

Coming back from an away mission to gather nutritional supplements, a transporter malfunction merges Tuvok and Neelix into one entity. Janeway is left with a difficult decision—whether to allow this new entity, Tuvix, to live or separate him and get her two friends back.

..............

This was a great episode...Tuvok & Neelix as one...Tuvix. It was sad that Janeway had to kill Tuvix when she wanted her two crew members back to normal.

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Voyager   

I'm half and half on this one. I really like the idea and I think that Tuvix does show aspects of both characters, I also like the tough decision Janeway had to make. However, something about it just makes me feel as if this is only a mediocre episode, yet I'm not sure why.

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I thought the episode was sort of mediocre because half of it was Tuvix running around making friends, or talking to Kes. Character wise we didn't see anything really new developing, but the moral question involved still made it interesting.

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HerbieZ   

I just found him irritating because he was too much of a logical care bare. But when it came to the decision to split him back into two people and a flower, that's when i liked the episode. He just should never of existed. :(

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Voyager   

I'm half and half on this one. I really like the idea and I think that Tuvix does show aspects of both characters, I also like the tough decision Janeway had to make. However, something about it just makes me feel as if this is only a mediocre episode, yet I'm not sure why.

I really don't know what I was thinking when I wrote this ak-crazy.gif

I just watched it again and thought it was fabulous. I give it a 10. It is one of the best moral/ethical dilemas shown in the series and the wrong decision was made. That's partly why I like it. Janeway is facing this problem, and the fact that she makes the wrong choice, shows that she is not infallable. I think had Kes not come to her asking for Neelix back, that Janeway might not have gone through with it.

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Artemis   

I thought the whole thing so unrealistic- and thats saying something for a Star Trek fan.

The 'moral dilemma' was contrived- and it looked forced and clichéd. If by a wild stretch something like that happened...uh, no. Can't for a second believe in the idea although the actor did a good job of blending the two different people.

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Not one of my favourites, though still good. I found myself tearing up a bit near the end when Kes came to Janeway and admitted she wanted Neelix back.

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Ael   

Its been a while since I have seen it, but I do remember that it was one I liked very much.

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Can't watch this one anymore; the immorality of Janeway 'killing' Tuvix just so she could get her buddy back is too much for me. This episode gives me serious 'ethics rage.' And while I agree that a good ST should be ethically/morally challenging, I can't abide a commanding officer who is essentially a cold-blooded murderer (even the Doctor, who is programmed for the crew's self-defense can't abide this one either; I'm with him).

Tuvix pleading for his life, only to have that plea fall on deaf ears just kills me.

I give it a 4.

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The episode solidified to me how evil that crew (minus the EMH) truly was. When he begged for his life and all of them just awkwardly stared away in shame made me sick to my stomach. Who needs a mirror universe episode when you have the VOY crew behaving like the Terran Empire?

I understand the dilemma and I too like ethical challenging ideas, but there was no fall out. Everyone was happy the next episode as if killing Tuvix was something they can brush off with ease. It was one of the most disturbing episodes in Trek. I cannot imagine Picard doing something like this. Not even the ethically shakeable Sisko.

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The episode solidified to me how evil that crew (minus the EMH) truly was. When he begged for his life and all of them just awkwardly stared away in shame made me sick to my stomach. Who needs a mirror universe episode when you have the VOY crew behaving like the Terran Empire?

I understand the dilemma and I too like ethical challenging ideas, but there was no fall out. Everyone was happy the next episode as if killing Tuvix was something they can brush off with ease. It was one of the most disturbing episodes in Trek. I cannot imagine Picard doing something like this. Not even the ethically shakeable Sisko.

On TNG, they probably would've probably just welcomed Tuvix as a new character. On DS9, one of the more 'ethically challenged' residents of the station (Garak, or one of the Ferengi) could've reversed the fusion (for some ulterior purpose), but not one of the Starfleet crew.

But on VGR, they ARE the ethically challenged bunch, aren't they?

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The episode solidified to me how evil that crew (minus the EMH) truly was. When he begged for his life and all of them just awkwardly stared away in shame made me sick to my stomach. Who needs a mirror universe episode when you have the VOY crew behaving like the Terran Empire?

I understand the dilemma and I too like ethical challenging ideas, but there was no fall out. Everyone was happy the next episode as if killing Tuvix was something they can brush off with ease. It was one of the most disturbing episodes in Trek. I cannot imagine Picard doing something like this. Not even the ethically shakeable Sisko.

I don't know that for Janeway it was even her buddy so much as she couldn't stand to see her friend haz a sad. So she murders someone to attempt to get two back that were already dead.

That crew was a shameful, wretched bunch.

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Hammer   

The tone at the end of this episode had a sudden shift too. We go from the doom of being marched to the transporter/execution chamber to the joyful reunion of Neelix and Tuvok with the crew. I just didn't feel the happy ending. It doesn't help that they brought in such a likable guest star who really nailed the role. Tom Wright's performance somewhat salvages this episode.

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The tone at the end of this episode had a sudden shift too. We go from the doom of being marched to the transporter/execution chamber to the joyful reunion of Neelix and Tuvok with the crew. I just didn't feel the happy ending. It doesn't help that they brought in such a likable guest star who really nailed the role. Tom Wright's performance somewhat salvages this episode.

Which makes his murder at the hands of his "friends" all the more horrible.

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The tone at the end of this episode had a sudden shift too. We go from the doom of being marched to the transporter/execution chamber to the joyful reunion of Neelix and Tuvok with the crew. I just didn't feel the happy ending. It doesn't help that they brought in such a likable guest star who really nailed the role. Tom Wright's performance somewhat salvages this episode.

Which makes his murder at the hands of his "friends" all the more horrible.

And the reason I don't want to revisit it; Wright was so charming in the role that frankly I liked his Tuvix better than the characters he was replacing...

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The tone at the end of this episode had a sudden shift too. We go from the doom of being marched to the transporter/execution chamber to the joyful reunion of Neelix and Tuvok with the crew. I just didn't feel the happy ending. It doesn't help that they brought in such a likable guest star who really nailed the role. Tom Wright's performance somewhat salvages this episode.

Which makes his murder at the hands of his "friends" all the more horrible.

And the reason I don't want to revisit it; Wright was so charming in the role that frankly I liked his Tuvix better than the characters he was replacing...

He was certainly worlds better than Neelix.

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I haven't watched this episode since it aired, but it was one of the few Voyager episodes that I thought was thought provoking and well done.

I do not like Voyager. I think the show was unoriginal, poorly written, the characters were incompetent and weak, and I felt it was disrespectful to the original series on a few occasions.

However, this episode was an early example of what could have been had the show had better people running it.

What I liked about it was I remember thinking, "how would the other captains have handled it?"

Ultimately, it's a no win situation. Do you condemn two lives to death, or one?

Does Tuvix have a greater right to live than Neelix and Tuvok?

It's a unique problem, but in this case, I do think Janeway made the right decision, albeit a difficult one.

I don't think it was right because of the 2 versus 1 thing, but Tuvok and Neelix were merged by accident, and they are the natural lives. They came first. Janeway has an obligation to them. If there was a way to save Tuvix too, she would have, but a choice had to be made. I think she made the right one.

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I haven't watched this episode since it aired, but it was one of the few Voyager episodes that I thought was thought provoking and well done.

I do not like Voyager. I think the show was unoriginal, poorly written, the characters were incompetent and weak, and I felt it was disrespectful to the original series on a few occasions.

However, this episode was an early example of what could have been had the show had better people running it.

What I liked about it was I remember thinking, "how would the other captains have handled it?"

Ultimately, it's a no win situation. Do you condemn two lives to death, or one?

Does Tuvix have a greater right to live than Neelix and Tuvok?

That's just the point; they BOTH lived on in Tuvix anyway... it wasn't as if the latter two 'died' really; he still retained their memories, but a third unique individual was created by that transporter malfunction and now THAT individual was killed (thanks, Janeway).

I'm pretty sure Archer would've split them (he's much like Janeway at times).

Kirk might've done the same. But I really think Picard and Sisko would've kept Tuvix around as a 'new' crew member; recognizing that even a life began as an 'accident' still has a right to exist (especially since no one else truly 'died' to create that life; they merged). Not to mention that Tuvix has unique attributes as an individual that neither Tuvok nor Neelix possessed; and he WANTED to live. It wasn't as if he willingly chose to be ripped apart into two beings again; he pleaded for his life. That was the critical difference.

When Kirk was split in two by the transporter, he had to be fused together again and soon because as McCoy discovered, neither half could survive alone. But in Tuvix's case? He PLEADED for his life. And by all genetic tests, he was a perfectly viable fusion of Vulcan and Talaxian DNA. It wasn't as if he was dying or one half rejected the other; he was a new and unique life form. Tuvix was the living embodiment of the Vulcan concept of IDIC.

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