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JayTheTrekkie

Meld

Favorite Overall Trek Series/Movie  

206 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your overall favorite Star Trek series?

    • Star Trek: Enterprise
      16
    • Star Trek: The Original Series
      51
    • Star Trek: The Animated Series
      0
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation
      55
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
      50
    • Star Trek: Voyager
      34
  2. 2. What is your overall favorite Star Trek movie?

    • Star Trek - I: The Motion Picture
      10
    • Star Trek - II: The Wrath of Khan
      41
    • Star Trek - III: The Search for Spock
      7
    • Star Trek - IV: The Voyage Home
      22
    • Star Trek - V: The Final Frontier
      4
    • Star Trek - VI: The Undiscovered Country
      29
    • Star Trek - VII: Generations
      11
    • Star Trek - VIII: First Contact
      64
    • Star Trek - IX: Insurrection
      7
    • Star Trek - X: Nemesis
      11


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Title: Meld

Episode: Season 2, Episode 16

TELEPLAY BY: Michael Piller

STORY BY: Michael Sussman

DIRECTED BY: Cliff Bole

First Aired: Feb 5, 1996

Stardate: Unknown

SUMMARY:

An unstable Maquis crewmember murders a Starfleet engineer. When an investigation points to the perpetrator, Tuvok attempts to help him gain control of his emotions via a mind meld, but is caught in the Betazoid's dark thoughts to the extent that he becomes a risk to the crew himself.

.....................

This was mostly a Tuvok episode and it was a good episode but not one of my favorite episodes.

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I really like this episode. I thing Suder is a great character and I really like how Tuvok goes darkside because of the mindmeld. Brilliant episode, I think.

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Lon Suder was one of my favorite characters, it was interesting to see not only a violent Betazoid, but one who didn't have their psychic abilities. He was one of the most quickly developed characters, but despite the quick development, we got to know who he was, and why violence wasn't really what drove him. Lon Suder proved that anyone can adapt and control themselves when they try, and with his death, the crew realized that friendship and determination can overcome anything, even someones violent nature, when it is given time to work.

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Oh this was one of Season 2's best episodes in my opinion. Suder was such a dark character against the all too obviously "perfect" Starfleet crew. And Tim Russ put in an awesome performance, especially the scene where he strangles holographic Neelix, loved that!

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I really like Suder's character, yet another awesome performance by Brad Dourif.

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It's not the worst episode, but it is quite slow.

And despite the fact that Tuvok is supposed to be a really experienced and seasoned officer, he comes across as an absolute idiot in this episode. He's supposed to be the security chief, yet he can't understand that someone could kill without a motive!

I loved it when he strangled Neelix, but as always with Voyager, whenever something interesting happens it turns out not to be real. Complete cop-out.

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Yeah, I can't see why Tuvok needed a motive so badly, Suder obviously had issues. I liked Suder as a heel character. His presence raised an interesting moral question. What do they do with him, throw him in the brig which is basically a temporary holding cell for the 70 year journey home? It doesn't even have a sink, shower or toilet! Execute him? That's against the law. Maroon him on a M class planet? He'd be a threat to whoever lived there and would be against the prime directive if there was any intelligent pre-warp life there. Ground him to his quarters, with replicator privileges? Seems rather lenient for what he did. It's too bad they didn't have more episodes with Suder, other than the two-parter where he goes on a Kazon killing spree.

Also, what the heck was Tuvok hoping to accomplish with the mind-meld? He couldn't just let that no-motive thing go, could he? He should have realized the risk involved. Poor judgement by Tuvok in this episode.

7/10

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I think that Tuvok needed a motive because he is a vulcan. He can not understand the concept of murder without motive.

Vulcan mind is logical. So for them is logical that you must have a motive for murder.

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So for them is logical that you must have a motive for murder.

Regardless of how logical Vulcans are (and Tuvok is) Suder was not a Vulcan, therefore one cannot expect him to act in the same way. For Tuvok not to realise this shows him to be somewhat incompetent. - Odo or Worf (or even someone as dopey as Ezri in Field of Fire) would have closed the case much earlier and gone on to other matters.

The security chief is the person who (amongst other things) investigates and solves crimes, and part of this requires at least some understanding of the criminal mind. Tuvok has none of this understanding; he reveals himself to be inflexible and unable to see outside his own box. How can you expect him to catch a killer when he's so utterly baffled with any behaviour outside his own idiosyncrasies?!

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Strangely enough, I really love this episode. Too bad Tuvok had to be changed back from evil; Tim Russ gave him a wonderfully cold and deeply sinister quality as 'evil' Tuvok. And regarding his rant against Janeway? I found myself nodding in agreement with him the whole time! :laugh::thumbup:

Truth hurts, doesn't it, captain?

The nagging logistical gap in this episode for me is the one everyone is talking about; how can a chief tactical/security officer have NO CONCEPT of random violence without motive? You'd think as a tactical man, you'd have to be acutely aware of the irrational impulses of your enemies or you'd be a grease spot on a corridor (or another body for a redshirt bonfire back in the TOS days). I can't imagine a decent cop or soldier with no idea of what darker impulses can overtake the human psyche sometimes. That's just ridiculous; Tuvok is over 100 years old and he's never wondered about it till NOW?!?

Tim Russ' REALLY shines in this one; as well as AWESOME guest star Brad Douriff as Suder (big fan of his since "Child's Play" "Exorcist 3" and even "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"; he is a top drawer talent... I'm surprised he did this role, frankly). For the immense acting talent of both Douriff and Tim Russ in this episode, I'll give it an 8.

It would've gotten a 10 if Tuvok's reason for performing the meld in the first place hadn't been so.... lame. A security/tactical officer who doesn't understand violence? Even DS9's Odo (who comes from a race of liquid) understood the criminal means and motives of solids after only a few years of observation....

I get it; Tuvok's a Vulcan. They don't express emotions, but that's NOT the same as not having them or not understanding them. I don't have leprosy, but I know what it can do to people.

And as Spock, T'Pol and ST09's Sarek have all admitted; Vulcans all HAVE emotions, in some ways their emotions run deeper than in humans, but they choose to suppress them with logic as a means to enlightenment and control. Which indicates to me that they are well-aware of the dangers of violent emotions and understand that danger all too well (as it nearly destroyed their world centuries before). I find Tuvok's total LACK of understanding of random violence to be highly unrealistic. Even if he doesn't find any such impulses in himself, he would've had to have studied them extensively (ala Odo) to be any worth a damn at his chosen career in starfleet tactical/security....

Edited by Sehlat Vie

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By far my favorite VOY episode. Outstanding performances by Tim Russ and Brad Douriff.

And a nice message: You only support death penalty when you share the dark impulses of (potential) murderers.

One of the few truly great VOY episodes.

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By far my favorite VOY episode. Outstanding performances by Tim Russ and Brad Douriff.

And a nice message: You only support death penalty when you share the dark impulses of (potential) murderers.

Yeah, I like that episode too; in fact, it's on my (very) short list of favorite VGR episodes.

Although it points out a deficiency in the idea of Tuvok being a security officer; how can a man who suppresses emotion so deeply be made to understand an all-too common occurrence as motive-less crime? That would be rather basic to a good security/policeman/tactical officer; some people just like to watch the world burn, and Suder (sp?) was one of those people. You'd think that, in a 100+ year lifespan, Tuvok would've understood this...

That said, I love the scene where his 'real' self tells Janeway off (some of that was kind of true, actually...) and Brad Douriff is such a WONDERFUL actor; this can't be overstated. I've been a fan of his since "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest" (1975) where he played the tragically shy mental hospital patient Billy Bibbit.

PS: OFOTCN also starred Louise Fletcher (DS9's Kai Winn) as the evil Nurse Ratched, and won an Oscar for her performance...

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I liked this episode, its miles above the quality of Voyager second season, one of the worst Trek seasons ever. You got Parturition, Prototype, Threshold, The Thaw and so forth......................a very weak season.

Gus

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I liked this episode, its miles above the quality of Voyager second season, one of the worst Trek seasons ever. You got Parturition, Prototype, Threshold, The Thaw and so forth......................a very weak season.

Gus

"The Thaw" should've been retitled "Killer Klowns From Inner Space".... :giggle:

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