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JayTheTrekkie

Alliances

Favorite Overall Trek Series/Movie  

206 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your overall favorite Star Trek series?

    • Star Trek: Enterprise
      16
    • Star Trek: The Original Series
      51
    • Star Trek: The Animated Series
      0
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation
      55
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
      50
    • Star Trek: Voyager
      34
  2. 2. What is your overall favorite Star Trek movie?

    • Star Trek - I: The Motion Picture
      10
    • Star Trek - II: The Wrath of Khan
      41
    • Star Trek - III: The Search for Spock
      7
    • Star Trek - IV: The Voyage Home
      22
    • Star Trek - V: The Final Frontier
      4
    • Star Trek - VI: The Undiscovered Country
      29
    • Star Trek - VII: Generations
      11
    • Star Trek - VIII: First Contact
      64
    • Star Trek - IX: Insurrection
      7
    • Star Trek - X: Nemesis
      11


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Title: Alliances

Episode: Seaosn 2, Episode 14

WRITTEN BY: Jeri Taylor

DIRECTED BY: Kim Friedman

First Aired: Jan 22, 1996

Stardate: 49337.4

SUMMARY:

After a Kazon attack, Chakotay proposes that Janeway ally Voyager with one of the Kazon sects for protection. She reluctantly opens negotiations, then makes contact with the Trabe, a historical enemy of the Kazon, now being persecuted by them.

................

This was an alright episode...didn't care much for this one. At least we got to learn a little more about the Kazons

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I also like the fact that we got to learn more about the Kazon and that in this episode, they weren't actually the bad guy (not so much anyway). It isn't an episode that particularly stands out, but it is a good story development for the Kazon.

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Yeah...bad idea there Chakotay.

Was thinking of skipping this one but watched it anyways (I will skip it on the dvd when I get the season set that is).

Not a favorite episode

Edited by JayTheTrekkie

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Since I'm not a big fan of the Klingon---er, Kazon (whatever; same species, just with bad hair) I give this one a 4.   The conference room shootup is lifted from the helicopter/conference room scene in "Godfather 3", and now it appears that Into Darkness is also stealing it as well.  Kind of ironic that two branches of ST are stealing a scene from a movie that everyone allegedly 'hated'.  ;-)

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The whole idea of an alliance with one of the Kazon factions was just half-baked. Voyager wasn't just hanging out in their space, they were getting out of it as fast as possible. For that matter, if Voyager is covering 1000 light years per year, and they spent 2 years dealing with them, how did a weak, divided Kazon end up dominating a 2000 light year swath of space? Why would Voyager waste time with the petty internal squabbles of the Kazon anyway? What advantage was there to the Kazon? Sure Voyager was formidable, but they couldn't be everywhere at once, and surely they weren't interested in back-tracking from their voyage home to settle scores for their allies.

Of course the whole episode was a setup for that final conference room shoot-up scene. That probably explains the contrived plot which leads to that scene.

5/10

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The whole idea of an alliance with one of the Kazon factions was just half-baked. Voyager wasn't just hanging out in their space, they were getting out of it as fast as possible. For that matter, if Voyager is covering 1000 light years per year, and they spent 2 years dealing with them, how did a weak, divided Kazon end up dominating a 2000 light year swath of space? Why would Voyager waste time with the petty internal squabbles of the Kazon anyway? What advantage was there to the Kazon? Sure Voyager was formidable, but they couldn't be everywhere at once, and surely they weren't interested in back-tracking from their voyage home to settle scores for their allies.

Of course the whole episode was a setup for that final conference room shoot-up scene. That probably explains the contrived plot which leads to that scene.

5/10

Not to defend the show (because its so dull & hackneyed I really can't), but I think it was mentioned somewhere that they could cross 1,000 LY per year at maximum warp; as we see in the first couple seasons, Voyager isn't always running at maximum warp (in fact, every hour she spends at impulse would theoretically add months to their journey... just saying). That and the fact that Janeway and crew seem compelled to stop and smell every blade of grass they come across (again; every hour at impulse... months added to the trip home). And the whole idea of Voyager stopping to do science stuff is kind of bulls**t anyway; her original mission was to find the Maquis raider and bring them to justice. She'd done that in the pilot. Now the captain's ONLY mission is to get her crew home. It was never stated anywhere that Voyager was on a science mission before she left DS9 for the Badlands. She was on a security-related mission at that point.

Another reason (among hundreds) that I have so little patience for this boring, pedantic branch of ST....

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They would have ran out of fuel if they didn't stop and mine a planet once in a while. The unnecessary stopping though was something that (often) Seven and (once) Tuvok complained about. Of course if the show was just about traveling at max warp without making contact with alien species, there wouldn't have been much of a show. It's one of the reasons I wish they had wrapped up their journey home portion of the show around the start of season 6. Maybe they could have done this by finding a wormhole or an abandoned transwarp conduit that would allow Starfleet to return and expand into the Delta Quadrant. That way they could have spent the last two seasons revisiting and harvesting the relationships they had built up, and they could have had the Borg as a villain without de-clawing them to the point that they couldn't defeat one ship. Also, if they had done this at the start of season 6, DS9's run would have been over and Voyager could have told the Alpha Quadrant's story without stepping on DS9's toes. We don't learn much about what is happening back 'at home' after the close of the Dominion War.

2000 Light Years is a very rough estimate. Who knows if 2 seasons took place chronologically over 2 years, although there were hints in the script that this was the case. Presumably, during the time between episodes they were traveling at max warp without incident. We can assume though that the area of space dominated by the Kazon was massive, 1k to 2k LY's, probably much larger than Federation space. It seems pretty odd that they would have such a wide influence considering their weak and divided nature.

Same goes with the Hirogen really. How did the Hirogen build a communications network that was so large, it extended to the Alpha Quadrant without being noticed by the Federation? How could they have accomplished this with such a decentralized nature, and in space that surely would have overlapped with Borg dominated areas.

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They would have ran out of fuel if they didn't stop and mine a planet once in a while. The unnecessary stopping though was something that (often) Seven and (once) Tuvok complained about.

I would've had no issue if the reasons they'd stopped were simple resupply/refueling missions. But often times they were to investigate 'subspace anomalies' or some other such crap that were simply not worth the risk to the crew of an unsupported single starship with limited supplies and no support if they ran into trouble (and don't give me Capt. Kirk's "Risk is our business" speech; that only applied to a ship with full support & resources of starfleet's muscle behind it).

I get the stated premise of VGR (what is was supposed to be, anyway): A conflicted crew (starfleet & maquis) alone in alien space, with no starbases or support, united in their common goal: to get home. But if the show had real courage of its convictions, it would been more akin to Ron Moore's Battlestar Galactica, but instead it was a tired, TNG rehash. The crew always spit & polish, the carpet always clean, the exterior always looking like the ship just drove through a galactic car wash. We (the audience) never felt the desperation of the premise! Moore's Galactica was run down; the sets were dirty, the uniforms were getting tattered (Chief Tyrol even stapled his together). The outside of the ship kept every dent, burn and scrape the ship had throughout the show. VGR? Not so much. Even with limited resources and such dire circumstances, everything looked hunky dory. Voyager could've been starfleet's flagship for all a casual viewer could see. THAT was one of my biggest frustrations of the show; the stated premise simply never matched what was shown on screen.

We're supposed to meet all new aliens; and we get Klingon wannabes (the Kazon), a race of hunters (the Hirogen, who were little more than Jem'Hadar hunting for sport), etc. The only races we saw that were truly unique for me were the Viidians (who get extra kudos from me for almost offing Neelix! Long distance high five.... :thumbup: ). The rest were just garden variety bumpy headed or oddly tattooed sorts; the kind we saw all the time on TNG. Even the Borg were de-balled so much that they eventually were about as threatening as an ill-tempered house cat (probably what inspired Seven's cat suit! :laugh: ). The show just reeks of sameness; its ST on autopilot. I tried to seriously delve back into it about four or five years ago, and every time I watched it I just felt like there were so many better shows I'd rather be watching.

So while VGR is (arguably) not the worst scifi show on TV, for me it commits the unforgivable sin of mediocrity and sheepishness. It had no courage to see its (potentially) dark premise through, and THAT is what I find so maddening about it. The fact that the climax of this episode ("Alliances") is based on a ripped off scene from what is (inarguably) the least of the "Godfather" movies kind of says it all. A mediocre show stealing its ending from a second-rate sequel. A copy of a copy. Kind of the show in a nutshell, really....

And if anyone disagrees? Go right ahead; I won't contest anything, this is just MY opinion of the show, nothing more. ;)

Edited by Sehlat Vie

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They would have ran out of fuel if they didn't stop and mine a planet once in a while. The unnecessary stopping though was something that (often) Seven and (once) Tuvok complained about. Of course if the show was just about traveling at max warp without making contact with alien species, there wouldn't have been much of a show. It's one of the reasons I wish they had wrapped up their journey home portion of the show around the start of season 6. Maybe they could have done this by finding a wormhole or an abandoned transwarp conduit that would allow Starfleet to return and expand into the Delta Quadrant. That way they could have spent the last two seasons revisiting and harvesting the relationships they had built up, and they could have had the Borg as a villain without de-clawing them to the point that they couldn't defeat one ship. Also, if they had done this at the start of season 6, DS9's run would have been over and Voyager could have told the Alpha Quadrant's story without stepping on DS9's toes. We don't learn much about what is happening back 'at home' after the close of the Dominion War.

2000 Light Years is a very rough estimate. Who knows if 2 seasons took place chronologically over 2 years, although there were hints in the script that this was the case. Presumably, during the time between episodes they were traveling at max warp without incident. We can assume though that the area of space dominated by the Kazon was massive, 1k to 2k LY's, probably much larger than Federation space. It seems pretty odd that they would have such a wide influence considering their weak and divided nature.

Same goes with the Hirogen really. How did the Hirogen build a communications network that was so large, it extended to the Alpha Quadrant without being noticed by the Federation? How could they have accomplished this with such a decentralized nature, and in space that surely would have overlapped with Borg dominated areas.

That's another thing: since when did Federation ships run on "fuel"? I thought all it needed was dilithium and by the 24 century, they had found some way to recrystalize it constantly or something. VOY suddenly introduced that they needed this resource, that resource. I don't recall the ENT-D needing so much.

As for the Hirogen, it didn't extend into the Alpha Quadrant. Beta Quadrant. I always assumed the Hirogen didn't build it but took it from another alien species or found it long ago and claimed it as theirs. Pretty useful to have such an expansive network for a species divided up in hunting parties spread out everywhere.

Sehlat Vie:

I thought the same thing about the Godfather III scene. Now the new movie is also doing it. Darn villains always using that tactic!

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They would have ran out of fuel if they didn't stop and mine a planet once in a while. The unnecessary stopping though was something that (often) Seven and (once) Tuvok complained about. Of course if the show was just about traveling at max warp without making contact with alien species, there wouldn't have been much of a show. It's one of the reasons I wish they had wrapped up their journey home portion of the show around the start of season 6. Maybe they could have done this by finding a wormhole or an abandoned transwarp conduit that would allow Starfleet to return and expand into the Delta Quadrant. That way they could have spent the last two seasons revisiting and harvesting the relationships they had built up, and they could have had the Borg as a villain without de-clawing them to the point that they couldn't defeat one ship. Also, if they had done this at the start of season 6, DS9's run would have been over and Voyager could have told the Alpha Quadrant's story without stepping on DS9's toes. We don't learn much about what is happening back 'at home' after the close of the Dominion War.

2000 Light Years is a very rough estimate. Who knows if 2 seasons took place chronologically over 2 years, although there were hints in the script that this was the case. Presumably, during the time between episodes they were traveling at max warp without incident. We can assume though that the area of space dominated by the Kazon was massive, 1k to 2k LY's, probably much larger than Federation space. It seems pretty odd that they would have such a wide influence considering their weak and divided nature.

Same goes with the Hirogen really. How did the Hirogen build a communications network that was so large, it extended to the Alpha Quadrant without being noticed by the Federation? How could they have accomplished this with such a decentralized nature, and in space that surely would have overlapped with Borg dominated areas.

That's another thing: since when did Federation ships run on "fuel"? I thought all it needed was dilithium and by the 24 century, they had found some way to recrystalize it constantly or something. VOY suddenly introduced that they needed this resource, that resource. I don't recall the ENT-D needing so much.

As for the Hirogen, it didn't extend into the Alpha Quadrant. Beta Quadrant. I always assumed the Hirogen didn't build it but took it from another alien species or found it long ago and claimed it as theirs. Pretty useful to have such an expansive network for a species divided up in hunting parties spread out everywhere.

Sehlat Vie:

I thought the same thing about the Godfather III scene. Now the new movie is also doing it. Darn villains always using that tactic!

TNG's Enterprise didn't go that far out, and they stopped off at Starfleet colonies and star bases fairly often. They weren't spending months at a time at high warp in transit to their next destinations. They were patrolling the outskirts of or fairly close to Federation-controlled space. It makes sense that the dilithium would need to be replenished at some point. When Q knocked the Enterprise several thousand light-years and forced an earlier than expected first contact with the Borg, and Picard orders the Enterprise to high-tail it out of there at max warp, Q says something about how the Borg Cube would eventually deplete the Enterprise's resources.

As for the Beta Quadrant, it seems to have a changing definition. Indeed it was the Beta Quadrant that the Hirogen controlled network reached, and the Promethius just happened to be in the area on it's way back to Romulan space. Did that make the Romulans a Beta Quadrant species? It's the one quadrant that was rarely referenced, let alone explored in ST.

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That's another thing: since when did Federation ships run on "fuel"? I thought all it needed was dilithium and by the 24 century, they had found some way to recrystalize it constantly or something. VOY suddenly introduced that they needed this resource, that resource. I don't recall the ENT-D needing so much.

Dilithium crystals are supposedly used to focus the reaction of the matter/antimatter; they are not the fuel source.

I believe I read somewhere (?) that Federation ships use their Bussard collectors at the fore ends of their nacelles to collect free hydrogen and mix it with anti-hydrogen. I've also heard deuterium mentioned (deuterium is a heavier isotope of hydrogen, so that fits). This is all pseudo-science of course, but all it really amounts to is a really big internal combustion engine; not too dissimilar to a giant 1974 Ford Pinto....

Edited by Sehlat Vie

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Thought it was an okay episode, only I really don't like the Kazon, worst adversaries ever. How could they come up with them. The Trabe had a trait the Voyager crew could have used once in a while in those 7 years in the Delta Quadrant. Chakotay, for me, is by far the weakest first officer of all Trek shows.

(6.5/10)

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