Sign in to follow this  
Guest Andrew98

Angel One

Recommended Posts

This isn't nearly as bad as I remember it being actually, it's certainly different. I used to always skip this, as I remembered it being pretty lame. I was more interested in the scenes on the ship, as I really liked the interaction between LaForge and Worf. Worf's sneezes were hilarious, and his ill walk was even better. Picard was hilarious as well, he reminded me a bit of Frasier on that early episode where he goes to work but gets sent home to bed with the flu :biggrin: The bits happening down on the planet aren't nearly as interesting or entertaining, but Riker's personality certainly starts coming out a lot more, which is great. This gets a 6.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooookay, here we go. I still don't like this episode. Let's take a look at the problems I'm having with it, shall we - I'm talking about the whole BUNCH of continuity issues, of which this episode is a virtual fountain.

1) Let's see. Angel One is a planet without warp capability, they don't even appear to have starships, their technological level of advancement is said to be roughly "mid-twentieth century Earth", which puts it in the 1950s/1960s, right? (Just what is that execution device then? Sure looks like hellishly advanced technology to me.) Its importance is described as being "strategic" for the sector in which it is and that the Federation thinks it might become a member at some point. Umm. Last time I checked, pre-warp civilizations were off-limits, no matter where they're located. The correct course of action would've been to set up a cloaked watchtower, like they did in "Who Watches The Watchers", and not to have merry starship folks visit the inhabitants about 60 years ago (62 I think it is). 60 years ago means their level of technological advancement was like Earth's 1890-1900. Something's definitely really screwed up here. (I know this is a general season 1 problem, but still, I find it particularly bad in this episode because they tried so half-heartedly to come up with an explanation as to why Angel One was suddenly okay to visit and all they did was slam into the wall called the Prime Directive, which, ironically, they kept quoting throughout without even realizing that the mere contact between Angel One and the Enterprise was already violating everything.)

2) That virus and the holodeck. It's beyond me how something as complex as a virus can originate from the holodeck. I'm willing to disregard the snowball that gets thrown at Jean-Luc, it is rather fast and it takes a bit of time for things to disintegrate outside the holodeck at this point on the show, as we saw in "The Big Goodbye" (we later see it differently in "Ship In A Bottle" when Jean-Luc throws that book out and it disintegrates right after passing the doorframe). I still think the correct thing to happen would've been for the snowball to fly through Jean-Luc, though. It shouldn't have had any substance left. But then what do I know about technobabble. It just irritates me how they used the holodeck as a plot device in a way that doesn't work even in the slightest.

3) The two plots themselves. The episode would have worked without that snowball virus as well - change some things about Angel One and then make it an episode about the Prime Directive itself, make Ramsey and his followers refuse to leave and let Riker and Jean-Luc deal with the implications. There was no need for a stupid 'everyone gets a cold' sub plot.

4) Speaking about the plot. Beata and the others need the Enterprise to find Ramsey? (Also, why does it take them this long to scan the planet for platinum? Stuff like this is usually done within seconds.) I don't think so. They knew that Ariel had married him. They could've followed her any time at any point and she would have led them directly to him, where Beata's folks could have grabbed him and his men and executed them without any interference from anyone. Why Beata claims that they can't find Ramsey at the beginning of the episode and why Ramsey actually wonders how they could find him is beyond me. It doesn't make any sense, but then, this is the general problem of this entire episode, so, it's just the continuation of a pattern, I guess.

5) Can also we talk about the fact that Riker casually dismisses his duty as the leader of an away team just so that he can have a 'nice encounter' with Beata? Not even Kirk would've done something like that. Riker just lets Data, Yar and Troi charge into an unknown situation while he busies himself with Beata. Umm, no...?

6) "Klingons appreciate strong women." Yeah, that's why they're not allowed to run a house or to serve on the High Council...

Now. These are the serious problems I'm having with this episode. But, as always, even this one has a few moments that deserve to be paid attention to.

First of all, I call this the CHEST HAIR EPISODE. And now with the Blu Rays, everything is even more detailed. I love how Beata runs her hand through Riker's chest hair carpet. Damn... I'd like to try that for myself, haha. (Although not precisely with RIKER's chest hair, ehehehe. tmi, perhaps?)

Also, TRENT. TREEEEENT! He's such a fabulous sassy character, I just have to mention him. The perfume scene! OMFG. Also, can we consider the implications of that scene in which he interrupts Beata and Riker for the first time and hands over the present from the Enterprise and then stands there and has this expectant look on his face that says 'okay, how may I take part in this, Mistress, I'm looking forward to this, because, mmm, Riker'. OH MYYYYYYYY. (I'm sure the writers never intended this, but this is what it looks like, haha.) ALSO, the scene in which Beata suggests that Data could "teach our men a thing or two". AHEM. Am I the only one who finds this insanely... naughty? lol

Speaking about Riker - I really like it that it's him who gets to make the inspirational speech for a change. I do like his speech, don't get me wrong. It's well-written and I like how he suggests that they're not fighting a revolution but evolution. Clever.

AND NOW CAN WE TALK ABOUT JEAN-LUC YES PLEASE. I loooooooooove the look on his face when that snow hits him. (I know it doesn't make a lot of sense, but HIS FACE, I can't.) And then there's the scene in which he HUGS HIS BLANKET. Can I be that blanket please? It's so cute how he sits there, trembling and hugs that blanket and his voice is shaking and awwwwwwwwwwwww, my poor baby. And also, may I mention that I love the ending with Riker asking about "the captain" before anyone else? He's all like 'how is my precious Jean-Luc is he alright where is he tell me so that I can say hi'. *hnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnggggg* It's those little scenes, y'know. Ah, OTP.

That's basically it, though. That's all. No more funny or interesting scenes.

Now. Like I said, I don't like this episode and I don't think I ever will. It has too many continuity problems whose creation could have easily been avoided if the writers had paid a little attention to their own show. It's one of my least favorite season 1 episodes, not even the whole chest hair and Riker's funny outfit business can help. I give this one a 3/10 only. It just doesn't offer me enough to give it a higher rating.

The favorite quote of the moment award goes to Jean-Luc, for his "NO!" barking at Worf's "Quite stimulating, wouldn't you say?" question. lmfao! Grumpy Husband at his best! :P

The favorite Jean-Luc moment for this episode is more an award for something that he has, and that's his chest hair. LOL I know I know, weird, but it looks so interesting in HD and I just can't resist staring at it, I'm sorry, I'm not really that shallow normally but aaaah, resistance is futile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2) That virus and the holodeck. It's beyond me how something as complex as a virus can originate from the holodeck. I'm willing to disregard the snowball that gets thrown at Jean-Luc, it is rather fast and it takes a bit of time for things to disintegrate outside the holodeck at this point on the show, as we saw in "The Big Goodbye" (we later see it differently in "Ship In A Bottle" when Jean-Luc throws that book out and it disintegrates right after passing the doorframe). I still think the correct thing to happen would've been for the snowball to fly through Jean-Luc, though. It shouldn't have had any substance left. But then what do I know about technobabble. It just irritates me how they used the holodeck as a plot device in a way that doesn't work even in the slightest.

I thought I was the only one wondering how the hell the holodeck could suddenly CREATE BIOLOGICAL LIFE!! :huh2:

6) "Klingons appreciate strong women." Yeah, that's why they're not allowed to run a house or to serve on the High Council...

facepalm-gif-33.gif << "OOOOPS..."

You got him on that one. :giggle:

Overall this one is so bad, it's hard to believe its from the same show that would later give us "Best of Both Worlds" and "Inner Light".... :dontgetit:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it sadly amusing that no one bothers to check out where that virus CAME from. They're all like "oh, it originated on the holodeck" and no one finds this even remotely odd. My guess is that this happened because the writers tried to (once again) squeeze too much into one episode and ended up with stuff that wasn't well thought-out at all (which is diplomatic for "it was total crap").

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to various technobabble, the Holodeck actually uses the Replicator technology to make many of the smaller items "real". - See Wesley dripping water in Encounter at Farpoint for example, as well as Moriarty's drawing in Elementary Dear Data...

This actually explains several of the apparent problems with such episodes.

Here for instance, the snowball must have been replicated, and thus capable of containing a virus - presumably it was one that the computer couldn't detect and filter out (or else those circuits must have been malfunctioning at the time).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to various technobabble, the Holodeck actually uses the Replicator technology to make many of the smaller items "real". - See Wesley dripping water in Encounter at Farpoint for example, as well as Moriarty's drawing in Elementary Dear Data...

I can buy that a holodeck can create an inorganic substance, like metals or water (or snow). But a virus?!? That took millions of years of evolution to come up with those.

And yes, I agree with Mr Picard above; once the snowball was thrown outside the holodeck, it should've disappeared. Viruses are alive; the holodeck cannot make living things, only simulacrums of life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't seen this episode in about 20 years or so, but for some odd reason I was feeling masochistic and decided to revisit it. Sometimes a long interim between viewings softens my initial opinions about an opinion. Well, Angel One got softer alright. Like decaying food...

Usually I just break things down to the good and bad and summarize, so I'll stick to what I know:

What I didn't like loathed about Angel One:

* The idea of a matriarchal society is NEVER explored in any meaningful way.

All Angel One says is that women in charge would do just as bad a job as patriarchal societies have. Instead of a meaningful exploration of this idea, we have to settle for a cheap switcheroo. The woman are tall, aggressive, dominant... in short, they're cliched examples of men. Yet they still wear full makeup, shoulder/arm baring outfits and when the right man comes along they just turn to mush.

* Riker claims that the Federation has full equality, yet the Enterprise is captained by a man, the first officer is a man, and the strongest, most intelligent member of the away team is a male-patterned android (!). The woman sent to negotiate with the Angel One leadership, Troi, is dressed in a cleavage-bearing, skin-tight jumpsuit and winds up letting RIKER do almost all of the negotiating (including f--king the prime minister!). Troi winds up looking just like the female equivalent of the stereotypically feminized "Trent" character (more on him later). I'm sorry, what contribution exactly did poor Troi make to the success of this mission again? Riker saves the day (in patriarchal storytelling fashion), and Troi (and Tasha) are left holding the luggage...

* Riker screwing the prime minister.

I know they were trying in those early years to establish Riker as the new Kirk, but Kirk's womanizing didn't look quite so cool in the late '80s as it did in the late '60s. Riker's point was to 'teach' Angel One's matriarchy about equality, but the episode wound up looking like some half-assed version of "Taming of the Shrew." Basically, all the prime minister needed was a good shagging from a strong male and everything would be OK. Hell, she'd even pardon the transport crew's death sentences... I mean, why not? Being 'butch' didn't get her the lovin' of a good man (which is apparently all she needed anyway, right?). If my eyes could roll back any further in my head, I'd be staring at my own cerebral cortex...

angelone125.jpg

* Trent.

So this is what the TNG writers think a stereotypical woman's role is? To prance about the prime minister's office, look sexy and effeminate, and direct people to their rooms? And the idea that such a feminized man would be seen as only a walking joke is shockingly offensive. It comes from a 'reverse Mad Men' school of gender role stereotyping, and even in the '80s it looked embarrassing. What about transgendered people? What about anyone who doesn't live their lives in a crude, predefined stereotype of a gender role??

angelone048.jpg

* I might've accepted the stereotypes a bit easier (maybe) if Angel One had lived up to it's initial established idea of being a sociological equivalent to "mid 20th century Earth" but we see no evidence of this. The technology we see on Angel One is quite advanced (save for a lack of warp drive). They have dematerializing weapons, automatic doors, advanced scanning, rooftop satellite dishes (which indicate space travel of some sort) etc. Hardly a bunch of 1950s-era throwbacks, as they we were told to expect...

* The holodeck creating life (in the form of a virus). An adaptive virus, no less. First, they'd already established that NOTHING leaves the holdodeck... except for life forms created on the holodeck (WTF??!). How the holodecks EVER got approval for use on a ship with families aboard is beyond me.

* Picard is in full 'grumpy Picard mode' here, but it's just off-putting to me in this one. I prefer the more evolved Picard of S2 and beyond. Sorry, but I do. Here he just comes off as close minded, inflexible and downright mean. Not the Picard who later becomes my favorite captain for precisely the opposite of those qualities. Grumpy Picard is funny for a laugh or two, but he'd be a nightmare to serve under... give me enlightened Picard any day of the week, please.

* To the crew of the crashed Federation ship Odin (ironically a patriarchal god of Earth legend): Just... f--king....LEAVE!

Take your damn families with you and get lost. The Enterprise crew is offering you transport out of there (to an unlimited number of more advanced worlds) yet you want to stay on a close-minded planet whose leadership wants to f--king execute you for the very notion of gender equality?? Your ship crashed there by accident and yet, in a few short years, this backwards ass planet has become so important to you that it's suddenly worth dying over?? I'm sorry, but that's kind of bulls#!t. I can only surmise that they wanted to stay because they needed to 'teach the women folk' of Angel One how to treat a man... again, a message about equality becomes diluted by the sight of the Prime minister's 'traitor' clutching the chest of the mullet-headed Odin captain, like a 'good girl.'

angelone222.jpg

^ MacGyver saves the entire planet, using a roll of duct tape and a safety pin...

* Data's nonsense about how removing the Odin crew's native spouses would violate the prime directive.... HOW? It was already violated when the Odin crew crashed there in the first place, and started taking spouses. What's the difference? Staying and being subject to the death penalty is in better keeping with the Prime Directive than just leaving quietly? Not to mention that the leadership of the planet was fully aware of their presence, and the way they tried to impose their own mortality on the planet. The damage was done; just beam them all the hell out of there. As we see in "Journey's End" and many episodes of DS9, forced resettlement was always an option... especially for non-natives. Once the Enterprise medical crisis was over, they should've just beamed the Odin crew (and their families up), and not given them a choice.

What I liked about Angel One:

* Not a damned thing.

This episode is irredeemably awful.

A zero.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, "Angel One" must be the low point of season 1, even behind "Justice" (which at least had the interesting idea of a superior life form playing "god" for a less developed one, which in other context, and if properly explored, might have been very interesting). IMO.

But I'm with Mr Picard here that the "chest hair"-Trent-aspect has a few comic elements, in an utterly trashy manner. I think the episode *does* have a slight rewatchability from the trash-angle (perhaps not quite as much as TOS "Spock's Brain", but *some* of it).

Edited by Sim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, "Angel One" must be the low point of season 1, even behind "Justice" (which at least had the interesting idea of a superior life form playing "god" for a less developed one, which in other context, and if properly explored, might have been very interesting). IMO.

But I'm with Mr Picard here that the "chest hair"-Trent-aspect has a few comic elements, in an utterly trashy manner. I think the episode *does* have a slight rewatchability from the trash-angle (perhaps not quite as much as TOS "Spock's Brain", but *some* of it).

I think that while "Agel One" and "Justice" are two of my least favorite TNGs, "Code of Honor" is just humiliating. It is the single worst episode of TNG ever. Not only is it a lazy ripoff of "Amok Time" (even the 'twist' ending), but the racist stereotyping of the 1940s sinister black African tribesman is just grotesque. "Angel One" is horrible (still a zero), but "Code Of Honor" is so bad I don't have a personal rating low enough for it.

I'd be OK if every copy of that one just disappeared of the planet overnight....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, "Angel One" must be the low point of season 1, even behind "Justice" (which at least had the interesting idea of a superior life form playing "god" for a less developed one, which in other context, and if properly explored, might have been very interesting). IMO.

But I'm with Mr Picard here that the "chest hair"-Trent-aspect has a few comic elements, in an utterly trashy manner. I think the episode *does* have a slight rewatchability from the trash-angle (perhaps not quite as much as TOS "Spock's Brain", but *some* of it).

I think that while "Agel One" and "Justice" are two of my least favorite TNGs, "Code of Honor" is just humiliating. It is the single worst episode of TNG ever. Not only is it a lazy ripoff of "Amok Time" (even the 'twist' ending), but the racist stereotyping of the 1940s sinister black African tribesman is just grotesque. "Angel One" is horrible (still a zero), but "Code Of Honor" is so bad I don't have a personal rating low enough for it.

I'd be OK if every copy of that one just disappeared of the planet overnight....

Yep, "Angel One" must be the low point of season 1, even behind "Justice" (which at least had the interesting idea of a superior life form playing "god" for a less developed one, which in other context, and if properly explored, might have been very interesting). IMO.

But I'm with Mr Picard here that the "chest hair"-Trent-aspect has a few comic elements, in an utterly trashy manner. I think the episode *does* have a slight rewatchability from the trash-angle (perhaps not quite as much as TOS "Spock's Brain", but *some* of it).

I think that while "Agel One" and "Justice" are two of my least favorite TNGs, "Code of Honor" is just humiliating. It is the single worst episode of TNG ever. Not only is it a lazy ripoff of "Amok Time" (even the 'twist' ending), but the racist stereotyping of the 1940s sinister black African tribesman is just grotesque. "Angel One" is horrible (still a zero), but "Code Of Honor" is so bad I don't have a personal rating low enough for it.

I'd be OK if every copy of that one just disappeared of the planet overnight....

I agree "Code of Honor" is just another low point of season 1, and the racist stereotyping is bad enough. But looking beyond this race issue, you got a mediocre below-average episode, because it's still not well-written. It's racist to make them all-black, sure, but the issue of their "code of honor" isn't racist. There *are* earth cultures with code of honors of that kind, after all. I'd object with the PC mentality that called me racist for taking offense that, say, certain Muslim immigrants are disgusting backward fucks because they have very much such a kind of "code of honor". It's the PC people who are assholes here, not those who point out that certain foreign cultures indeed are inferior.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, "Angel One" must be the low point of season 1, even behind "Justice" (which at least had the interesting idea of a superior life form playing "god" for a less developed one, which in other context, and if properly explored, might have been very interesting). IMO.

But I'm with Mr Picard here that the "chest hair"-Trent-aspect has a few comic elements, in an utterly trashy manner. I think the episode *does* have a slight rewatchability from the trash-angle (perhaps not quite as much as TOS "Spock's Brain", but *some* of it).

I think that while "Agel One" and "Justice" are two of my least favorite TNGs, "Code of Honor" is just humiliating. It is the single worst episode of TNG ever. Not only is it a lazy ripoff of "Amok Time" (even the 'twist' ending), but the racist stereotyping of the 1940s sinister black African tribesman is just grotesque. "Angel One" is horrible (still a zero), but "Code Of Honor" is so bad I don't have a personal rating low enough for it.

I'd be OK if every copy of that one just disappeared of the planet overnight....

Yep, "Angel One" must be the low point of season 1, even behind "Justice" (which at least had the interesting idea of a superior life form playing "god" for a less developed one, which in other context, and if properly explored, might have been very interesting). IMO.

But I'm with Mr Picard here that the "chest hair"-Trent-aspect has a few comic elements, in an utterly trashy manner. I think the episode *does* have a slight rewatchability from the trash-angle (perhaps not quite as much as TOS "Spock's Brain", but *some* of it).

I think that while "Agel One" and "Justice" are two of my least favorite TNGs, "Code of Honor" is just humiliating. It is the single worst episode of TNG ever. Not only is it a lazy ripoff of "Amok Time" (even the 'twist' ending), but the racist stereotyping of the 1940s sinister black African tribesman is just grotesque. "Angel One" is horrible (still a zero), but "Code Of Honor" is so bad I don't have a personal rating low enough for it.

I'd be OK if every copy of that one just disappeared of the planet overnight....

I agree "Code of Honor" is just another low point of season 1, and the racist stereotyping is bad enough. But looking beyond this race issue, you got a mediocre below-average episode, because it's still not well-written. It's racist to make them all-black, sure, but the issue of their "code of honor" isn't racist. There *are* earth cultures with code of honors of that kind, after all. I'd object with the PC mentality that called me racist for taking offense that, say, certain Muslim immigrants are disgusting backward fucks because they have very much such a kind of "code of honor". It's the PC people who are assholes here, not those who point out that certain foreign cultures indeed are inferior.

Easy on the language, my friend... this isn't the KM section, OK?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just cuz I had to...

angelone085.jpg

You know, I'm pretty sure I saw that light fixture at Ikea the other day...nice to know the 80's are coming back in style... :)

I've seen those kinds of lighting fixtures too! I actually think my brother-in-law has one...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least the lighting fixture is the only thing that seems to be coming back. 80's clothing is pretty horrendous. It always struck me that while everyone looked great in uniform, the characters (until the movies, at least) had the most awful civilian clothes around. I wasn't sure if it was to emphasize their identities as Starfleet officers, or the fact that the Federation had evolved beyond value judgments about fashion...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least the lighting fixture is the only thing that seems to be coming back. 80's clothing is pretty horrendous. It always struck me that while everyone looked great in uniform, the characters (until the movies, at least) had the most awful civilian clothes around. I wasn't sure if it was to emphasize their identities as Starfleet officers, or the fact that the Federation had evolved beyond value judgments about fashion...

I can't imagine wanting to look like a human shower curtain would ever be in style...

farpoint1_098.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sehlat, Sehlat, Sehlat. I can promise you 400 years ago, they couldn't imagine how we dress today. haha :P

Trust me, your descendants will be dressing like Wesley Crusher and Jake Sisko. :P :P :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sehlat, Sehlat, Sehlat. I can promise you 400 years ago, they couldn't imagine how we dress today. haha :P

Trust me, your descendants will be dressing like Wesley Crusher and Jake Sisko. :P :P :P

Luckily, I'll be too dead to notice or care... :laugh:

themosttoys2.jpg?resize=475%2C365&type=v << "You're going to play the grape in the Fruit of the Looms commercial and that's FINAL!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this