Mr.Picard

The Sir Patrick Stewart Topic

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I can well imagine. It was a very gritty film...But - he looked good.

Yes, he did indeed. I'm just sad that he didn't play a major role, but I have to keep in mind that, back then, no one really knew him. Well, except for theatergoers, of course. :thumbsup2:

My favorite 'Mr. Stewart role' is this one, though:

Seianus.png:thumbsup2:

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I, Claudius? I don't recall.

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I, Claudius? I don't recall.

Yes, that's him as Sejanus... in "I Claudius"! :thumbsup2: He's my fave role... although Mr. Stewart really disliked him. :cry:

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Welll- there were a lot of very unsavory characters in that if I so say so myself!

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Welll- there were a lot of very unsavory characters in that if I so say so myself!

I know! That's why I love it so much! And Sejanus is the most unsavory of all! :biggrin:

LOTS of new things for me to report now, folks. :cry: I'll have to split this because it's so much stuff.

First of all, here's another picture from the opening night party! ;)

09_stewart_lgl.jpg

And then there's this amusing little story. I love cellphone stories! :thumbsup2:

Patrick Stewart keeps Shakespeare company

NEW YORK — While touring in the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of The Tempest, Patrick Stewart had a moment of panic. He was more than halfway through a scene when he realized he had left his cellphone on — in his costume pocket.

Thinking on his feet, the old pro devised an emergency plan: "It crossed my mind that if it did ring," which it didn't, "I could take it out and say, 'I told you not to call me at work.' "

Though best known for playing Jean-Luc Picard in TV's Star Trek: The Next Generation and Professor Charles Xavier in three X-Men films, Stewart, 67, spent the first three decades of his career treading the boards and still considers the stage his natural habitat. "At the moment, I've actively chosen to be in the theater and not anywhere else."

Specifically, Stewart has chosen Shakespeare. Through May 24, he'll star on Broadway in a new production of Macbeth helmed by Rupert Goold, who also directed Stewart in 2006's Tempest. His previous credits include acclaimed runs in Harold Pinter's The Caretaker and Arthur Miller's A Ride Down Mt. Morgan.

"I've known most of these speeches since I was 17," says Stewart in his dressing room at the Lyceum Theatre, where Macbeth opened Tuesday. "I used to walk the streets reciting them to myself. I didn't understand them much, but I liked the sound and the rhythm."

Stewart's Macbeth had to be an older man: "I can't escape from that." The actor also decided Lady Macbeth should be a younger woman. "To me, that motivates an awful lot of what happens. He's completely besotted by her."

Kate Fleetwood, the thirtysomething actress cast in the role (and Goold's wife), "tolerates my groping and fondling with good humor," he jokes.

Some close to Stewart, who is twice divorced and has two grown children, have been more unsettled by his performance. "My son's (Daniel's) mother-in-law came with her husband, and he came around after the show and said, 'I'm really sorry, but my wife's in a bar across the street. She needed a drink.' "

Plenty of Trekkies have shown up outside the stage door. "Every night, I meet people who say, 'I've never been to a Shakespeare play,' or 'I've never been to the theater.' They come because they've come to see Picard. And that's fine, because they're not going to see him. I like to think that Star Trek and X-Men have been partly responsible for helping to create a new audience."

That audience includes children, who are "fans of one or the other franchise. … You invariably find that they had a great time," he says. "Macbeth is easy to follow. My kids started going to see Shakespeare when they were 3 or 4. I would tell them, 'If you get tired, rest your head on my knee and fall asleep.' "

Stewart will return to Royal Shakespeare for a new Hamlet that opens in Stratford-upon-Avon in August and London in November; he'll play Claudius. "I'm down to do a 20th-century play after that. I can't talk about it yet, but it's so exciting that I get goose bumps every time I think about it."

Not that he'll ever abandon the Bard. "I hope to do Lear and Falstaff at some point," Stewart says. And Leontes in The Winter's Tale, a role he has played before. "It would be interesting to approach him as an older man."

Source

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Here's another picture! :thumbsup2:

untitled-1.jpg

Patrick Stewart returns to his roots

NEW YORK -One recent Monday at 8:30 p.m., Patrick Stewart found himself with nothing to do.

He didn’t have to go to work — his play "Macbeth" was closed for the night. And Stewart, who has earned raves playing the doomed Scottish king, had not made any other plans.

"I did actually think, ’This is the saddest thing.’ Here’s a leading actor in a Broadway show on his night off and he’s sitting at home on his own. Nobody to see, nothing to do, nowhere to go. What am I going to do?"

Then his eyes fell on a copy of "Hamlet."

So Stewart cracked open a bottle of good Napa wine and settled down to reread another Shakespeare tragedy.

"It just turned into the greatest evening," says Stewart, wistfully. "After 50 years, it still takes my breath away."

During a conversation over soup and salad before a recent performance, one thing becomes abundantly clear: Stewart is a hard-core Shakespeare freak.

He’s a man who memorized Shakespeare for fun as a teen and spent 14 years with the Royal Shakespeare Company. He never abandoned The Bard despite commanding a star ship for seven years on TV’s "Star Trek: The Next Generation."

Even on vacation he can’t let go: Stewart, who managed to slip away to the Caribbean for a few days before "Macbeth" debuted on Broadway, found that the misty moors followed.

"I was walking along the beach muttering the lines," he says, laughing.

There’s little tropical heat in Stewart’s "Macbeth," an updated, hair-raising interpretation that reeks of Stalin and Orwell. The single set and Soviet-style uniforms are augmented by a supernatural freight elevator, video projections and a kitchen sink — for Lady Macbeth to wash the gore. The Three Witches even rap.

Stewart, 67, who has grown a vaguely unsettling mustache for the part, portrays a Scottish king more Hamlet than Richard III — introspective, analytical, thoughtful, questioning. It’s his first Macbeth.

"Nearly 50 years I’ve waited," says Stewart. "I learned it when I was 14. I memorized all the soliloquies just because I thought they were great. And they stuck, so I didn’t have to learn those bits of the play, which is a blessing, because learning lines has now become the one curse of this job."

The production, under the direction of Rupert Goold, debuted in May 2007 at England’s Chichester Festival Theatre, switched to London’s West End and then moved to the Brooklyn Academy of Music before transferring to Broadway.

Stewart’s performance has earned him some of the best reviews of his career. The Times of London said his Macbeth "is an enthralling creation of frailty, appetite, egotism and grim humor." The Daily Telegraph said he had turned in "a truly great performance."

His Lady Macbeth agrees. Kate Fleetwood, who is married to Goold, has found Stewart to be an actor of incredible energy and a playful leader of the company.

"I think he’s invigorated by his successes over the past couple of years," she says. "The sweetness of what he’s achieving now is all the more sweet because he’s put the work in over the years."

Raised in Yorkshire, England, Stewart joined an amateur drama group at 12 and later won a scholarship to the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, launching a career as a character actor.

"What I’m doing now is all I ever wanted to do. I didn’t have any other ambitions," he says. "Once I’d been accepted into the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1966, I was perfectly content."

He stayed for an eyebrow-raising 14 years, playing everything from Mark Anthony to Henry IV to Shylock to Oberon. "People who were not in the company would say to me, ’Give it a break. Why don’t you go somewhere else?’ And I would say, ’To do what?’" he says. "Telly?"

Stewart eventually left to look for more modern fare. He had just done a production of "Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" in 1987 when an interesting offer came along. "I found myself in Hollywood shooting a syndicated science fiction series, which I was assured would fail."

It didn’t, of course. Thanks to Stewart’s rich baritone and noble bearing, the "Star Trek" franchise ran for seven years, 178 episodes and produced four feature films.

Despite the Borg and Klingons, Stewart still managed to make room for blank verse. He established the Paramount Shakespeare Company, a workshop on Saturday and Sunday mornings for any actor interested.

"I was keeping my hand in," he says.

Part of his sci-fi life has followed him to Broadway. In his dressing room sits a boxed up Capt. Jean-Luc Picard action figure and a bumper sticker that reads "Picard/Riker 2008: Make It So."

The show gave him a higher visibility, which led to more work, including roles in the films "Conspiracy Theory," ”L.A. Story" and the "X-Men" series, and Broadway, where he starred in "The Tempest," ”The Caretaker" and multiple outings of his one-man "A Christmas Carol."

The lure of Shakespeare continued unabated, even if playing Hamlet, Romeo or Orlando were now out of reach. Lear or Falstaff or Macbeth were still manageable — and he leapt at the Scot.

Before the play arrived in the United States, Stewart spent a few days alone in Italy. He found himself in Florence, staring at Michelangelo’s famous four unfinished slave sculptures, forever emerging from their blocks of stone.

"It was wonderful standing in front of them, because it became a very vivid symbol for me of what I actually feel creating a role. It’s there and you have to strip away bits of yourself until — whoop — there’s Macbeth."

Stewart already has more Shakespeare on the horizon. He’s signed up to appear as Claudius for a six-month Royal Shakespeare Company run of "Hamlet." His yearlong journey in "Macbeth" is due to end on May 24 but, for Stewart, it will remain unfinished.

"You’re never done — that’s the great thing. I know come the 24th of May, we’re going to be feeling like Liam Neeson’s character in ’Schindler’s List’: ’I could have done more,’" he says.

"You can never say this job is done, mission accomplished. That’s impossible with Shakespeare."

Source

More critics! :thumbup:

Stewart is somewhat older than the traditional take on the title character, giving his brutal bid for power a suggestion of resentment at being a valiant, long-serving warrior overdue for leadership. He starts out relaxed and almost affably chatty, his thirst for advancement fueled by his wife. But there are affecting moments of befuddlement in his performance, becoming increasingly addled as his paranoia spirals and the encroaching shadows of his own misdeeds crowd in on him.

Source

And another little interesting chit chat with him...

Did he feel he had to be an actor of a certain age to do justice to Macbeth? "I don't at all," he shot back without much undue thought. "Other people [read: critics] seem to think so. However, if you scour the play, you'll find no reference to anybody's age."

The "tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow" speech, delivered over the lifeless body of his lady, leaves a special ache with the audience. Rarely has his magnificent voice been employed to such eloquent effect. It numbers among his favorite moments in the play. "I enjoyed all the scenes I have with Kate. As well as being an extraordinary actress, she is a dear friend and collaborator, and we have a lot of fun together. We twinkle at one another a lot. She's very free. We have a great time."

Source

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Excellent stuff Mrs. P!

I also think it's wonderful how the journalist handled "The Picard Issue." He does seem thrilled indeed to be bringing so many new people to The Bard. :)

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All of this just makes me want to go and see him on stage more than ever!

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Excellent stuff Mrs. P!

I also think it's wonderful how the journalist handled "The Picard Issue." He does seem thrilled indeed to be bringing so many new people to The Bard. :)

Yes, there are still journalists who are able to handle that issue with decency. :thumbsup2:

All of this just makes me want to go and see him on stage more than ever!

Yeah, me too. I was actually planning on seeing him once a year. Didn't work out last year, though (no money :( ). I'm waiting for him to come back to England now. :angel_not:

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What? We can't keep him?

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What? We can't keep him?

Oh no, he moved back to England in 2004, so he's just 'visiting' the US at the moment. ;) But don't worry, I don't live in England either, so... :laugh:

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I would love to be able to see him in Macbeth, but sadly, I live nowhere near NY, and anything betting, those performances are long sold out. I do plan to write him at the theater though, and I hope I get a response. He is a guy, I would love to be able to just sit and talk with. (yeah, like that will happen..lol)

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I would love to be able to see him in Macbeth, but sadly, I live nowhere near NY, and anything betting, those performances are long sold out. I do plan to write him at the theater though, and I hope I get a response. He is a guy, I would love to be able to just sit and talk with. (yeah, like that will happen..lol)

As far as I know, there are still tickets available... the transfer to Broadway happened on a very short notice. :)

Same here, I'd lov to just talk to him for a while. Those few seconds I got at the stage door back then weren't enough. *lol* (Just kidding, I said what I wanted to say and that's okay. However, I'm sure I'd be able to come up with something to talk about with him... soccer, perhaps. :thumbsup2: I don't get nervous when he's around, I guess that's a good sign.)

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I just found this interview! :biggrin: It's HI-LA-RI-OUS. I can't stop laughing. :laugh: *loves his sense of humor*

If there’s a Shakespearean production in town, chances are Patrick Stewart is in it—and if he’s not, you want him to be. Best known for playing Captain Jean-Luc Picard on Star Trek: The Next Generation, the 67-year-old actor has taken on the lead role in an imaginative staging of Macbeth, set in a Stalinist society and featuring AK-47s and lots of blood. After a critically acclaimed stint at BAM, the play runs on Broadway through May 24. Stewart recently called to give us the lowdown.

Time Out New York: Your voice is even cooler on the phone. You should totally have a voice-off with James Earl Jones.

Patrick Stewart: That’s a funny thought. Well, I’m a huge admirer of his and have been fortunate enough to meet him a couple of times. But I just shut up when I’m around somebody like that. I don’t even want to compete.

TONY: It could be great, though. You versus him for Most Awesome Voice?

Patrick Stewart: Listen—you find someone to put the money up, and I’ll do it.

TONY: You grew up in Yorkshire. How was the pudding?

Patrick Stewart: You’re talking about the greatest culinary achievement in the world. There is nothing to beat a fine Yorkshire pudding. The great thing that outsiders such as yourself don’t understand is there aren’t many other dishes that can be eaten as a first course, a main course and a dessert. You can do that with Yorkshire pudding.

TONY: I do that with pizza. Is everyone over there required to own a terrier?

Patrick Stewart: [Laughs] I would love to own a dog of any kind, but my profession makes that impossible.

TONY: You’re forever turning up in Shakespearean plays. Any notable ones you haven’t done?

Patrick Stewart: Romeo and Juliet. But there’s nothing in that for me now.

TONY: Well, you could play Romeo if the director went a little nuts with it.

Patrick Stewart: Please. Do you want people throwing up in the stalls?

TONY: I do, actually. But then, I also like all the fake blood in this version of Macbeth. What is that stuff?

Patrick Stewart: I’ve no idea what it is. I never ask. I was once in a production and, without telling the cast at one performance, they used real blood. We knew something was wrong because there was a smell that we’d never had before.

TONY: Gross. Real blood sucks.

Patrick Stewart: Yeah. All in all, I really like blood when it’s inside my skin.

TONY: Ditto. Is it true that you took the subway from Manhattan when the play was at BAM?

Patrick Stewart: Every day. I’m a great believer in public transport.

TONY: Did anyone ever mess with you?

Patrick Stewart: Nothing, I swear to you. Well, one day a guy winked at me. Of course, for all I know he might have just been trying to pick me up or thought I was cute. Which I am. No, nothing. I travel as a completely private individual.

TONY: Will you allow me to put on my Ferengi ears for a minute?

Patrick Stewart: Oh, go on. You don’t know the titles of the episodes, do you? Because that’s going to be really weird if you do.

TONY: Sadly, I don’t. Did your classically trained actor friends make fun of you when you started doing Star Trek: The Next Generation?

Are you kidding? They would have died to have changed places with me. Every single one of them.

TONY: Is that because of the money?

Patrick Stewart: Yes, of course it is. When I used to go home to England, I’d meet the most serious and distinguished English actors and it would take less than five minutes before one of them would say, “So, what do you make?”

TONY: You’re not in the upcoming J.J. Abrams prequel. Are you done with Picard then?

Patrick Stewart: I think everything to do with The Next Generation is now in the past.

TONY: Now I’m sad. You were funny in Extras, though. I remember that you pitch Ricky Patrick Stewart: Gervais an idea for a script, but what was it about again?

The idea was that I could control people with my mind. All it came down to was making women’s clothes fall off.

TONY: Do you wish you had that power?

Patrick Stewart: No, sir.

TONY: I do.

Patrick Stewart: Oh. Well, I have a very nice life. Maybe you lead a very sheltered one.

(Source)

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See that? He's just a guy like everyone else! :)

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See that? He's just a guy like everyone else! :)

Of course he is. What else would he be? ;)

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Wonderful!

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:laugh:

funny guy

anyone seen him in the Christmas Carol (the play)? He was wonderful, really great performance...

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^ I wish I had been able to!

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well, it was almost 15 years ago, but it is still one of the best performances I've seen...

and I think you've probably seen this, but...I'm going to post it anyway :laugh:

Patrick and David Suchet in Playing Shakespeare

youtube link

wonderful series (by RSC and LWT and BBC) on how to play Shakespeare - best part is one hour with Partick Stewart and David Suchet playing The Merchant of Venice :worthy:

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well, it was almost 15 years ago, but it is still one of the best performances I've seen...

and I think you've probably seen this, but...I'm going to post it anyway :laugh:

Patrick and David Suchet in Playing Shakespeare

youtube link

wonderful series (by RSC and LWT and BBC) on how to play Shakespeare - best part is one hour with Partick Stewart and David Suchet playing The Merchant of Venice :worthy:

You mean his one-man-performance? Many people have told me how wonderful it is... he did that again at the end of 2005, this time in London. It was announced on a very short notice and yet it was sold out in no time.

Yes, I know about "Playing Shakespeare". I have the book, or the script of the show or whatever it is. Haven't seen the entire series yet, though... couldn't get my hands on it, there doesn't seem to be a DVD version (not yet, that is - oh well, I'm patient *lol*)...

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yes, one man performance...I've seen it a couple of times (on Broadway, I think it was '94)...wonderful, just wonderful...

as for playing shakespeare, I have it on 6 dvds (it is a vhs rip), not great quality, but great thing to see...I will try to upload part of it somewhere... :)

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yes, one man performance...I've seen it a couple of times (on Broadway, I think it was '94)...wonderful, just wonderful...

as for playing shakespeare, I have it on 6 dvds (it is a vhs rip), not great quality, but great thing to see...I will try to upload part of it somewhere... :)

Yes, it was on Broadway, back in the 90s... I've seen bits and pieces of that one-man-show on the internet and it was amazing. I also have the CD... I love to listen to it before I go to bed. :thumbsup2:

********************

Alright, folks, I have no idea if I should take these 'news' seriously since the person who wrote them has no idea... see the headline? Star Wars? WTF? :thumbdown:

However, IF this WERE true, it'd be really, really cool. Like I said, it's nothing more than some weird rumor. However, when it comes to Mr. Stewart, I have come to realize that it is never wise to ignore internet rumors, as insane as they might sound.

And the article comes with a picture, so... if the rumors aren't true, I'll still have a nice picture. :biggrin:

Stew.jpg

Star Wars' Patrick Stewart plans next stage installment

Patrick Stewart, whose Macbeth officially opened on Broadway this week, tackles another iconic Shakespearean role next year, when he plays Iago in a production of Othello planned for Chichester.

Stewart told me recently that he wants to devote as much time as he possibly can to performing on stage. He said that all the years in Star Trek on TV and the X-Men movies has given him the financial freedom to pursue his love of the theatre.

The actor began his journey with Macbeth at the Chichester Festival Theatre. That production, under the astute direction of Rupert Goold, then moved to Shaftesbury Avenue.

The blood-splattered play travelled across the Atlantic to sell- out performances at the Brooklyn Academy Of Music, then on Tuesday it opened at the Lyceum Theatre on Broadway.

After the limited run, Stewart said he'll have a very short break and then head to the UK for rehearsals with the Royal Shakespeare Company for Hamlet, with David Tennant in the title role. But in 2009, director Goold wants Stewart to play Iago. Both actor and director have done the play before.

Stewart played Othello 11 years ago in Washington, in what was termed a ' photonegative' production, with Stewart playing Othello without ' black- face' make-up and all the other parts performed by black actors.

One proposal for the 2009 Othello is to set it in Iraq, packing the stage with rubble and tanks. Deals are still being worked out and Chichester hasn't confirmed Othello yet.

(Source)

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Iago - truly one of the most inexplicably evil characters in all of Shakespeare! Ahhhhhhh

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Iago - truly one of the most inexplicably evil characters in all of Shakespeare! Ahhhhhhh

Iago, Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are my favorite Shakespeare characters (I have a thing for evil characters, who cares about the good ones?? *lol*). It'd be soooooooooo awesome if Mr. Stewart played Iago!!! :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

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