Mr.Picard

The Sir Patrick Stewart Topic

4,336 posts in this topic

Since this is probably the only message board on which I did NOT have such a topic so far, the time has come for me to create one. :laugh:

As you all know, I'm obsessed with a huge fan of Mr. Stewart and his work - and I love be up do date when it comes to "what is he doing right now?". So... I'll post Stewart-related news here, and, if I'm in the mood, pictures as well.

Also, if you have any questions about him (serious ones, please... well... okay, somewhat serious might do as well :laugh: ), feel free to ask and I'll try to come up with an answer.

I just say this because I don't want you to see this topic as one that has only me posting news and nothing else, nah, that's not how all this is meant... I mean I don't mind posting news, but I also don't mind if someone asks a question or posts a picture or something. See what I mean? ^^

****************

And now... weeeeeeell, so what IS he doing at the moment? :biggrin: He's in New York City right now, performing Shakespeare's Macbeth (my favorite play!!! *squee*) on Broadway at the Lyceum Theatre.

And since I found this nice little interview today, I thought I'd just go ahead and post it.

Channeling Macbeth, Patrick Stewart Threatens to Kneecap Us

Patrick Stewart is on a Shakespearian high, playing a host of the Bard’s greats in back-to-back-to-back productions: Last summer he dazzled British critics as Twelfth Night’s Malvolio, and next year he’s taking on Hamlet’s uncle for the Royal Shakespeare Company. In between, he continues his role as the ambition-addled Macbeth, as BAM’s 1984-esque reimagining of the play moves to Broadway. Trekkies be warned: Macbeth may be a commander, but Stewart’s not reprising his famous stint as Jean-Luc Picard — Captain Picard was far too nice of a guy. Stewart, proudly, is not. And he’ll probably break our kneecaps for saying so.

Prior to coming to America, you were playing Macbeth while you were rehearsing Twelfth Night. Did you ever conflate the characters?

This is a common misconception of people who don’t do my job. That never happens. I once played Oberon in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and there was one scene where I had to stand silently for pages and pages and pages while some other actors were doing another scene. I decided I would use the time to run through speeches from another play I was rehearsing, Titus Andronicus. I could never, ever even get started. I simply could not bring the lines into my head because I was in the wrong context. So no— it never, ever, ever happens.

Do you have to play the role differently for an American audience? Do you have to dumb it down?

I have to ask you a question: Did you ask that just to be provocative? Because I cannot believe that a smart woman like you thinks that I am going to actually going to answer in the affirmative to that question. You’re being provocative, aren’t you?

Yes, we were. But there’s got to be some change, no?

Noooo. Why would there be? Why would we change our production just because we’re playing to people who speak with a different accent? It makes no sense at all. But you do change us, because American audiences always find more humor in everything than British audiences do. And that’s been the case with Macbeth; we’ve added running time on our production solely because of laughs. It’s just because American audiences are more receptive to humor and irony, and so they respond much more viscerally to what’s going on.

There is a line in Macbeth, “Thou wouldst be great; / Art not without ambition, but without / The illness should attend it.” Is ambition an illness?

If greatness is what you’re pursuing rather than just success, then you have to be single-minded, dedicated, and rigorous in your life plan. Families are less important, friends are less important. People sacrifice all of that if it's greatness they're pursuing. But if all you want to do is the best you can, which is a kind of ambition, then I don’t think it requires an illness to attend it. Look at the Democratic candidates. Do you not think that to be that ambitious there has to be a certain kind of sickness?

Sure.

Now if you write that Patrick Stewart thinks that Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama are sick, I will come and find you and I will kneecap you.

We're actually going to write that we were just threatened by Patrick Stewart.

Yes, you were. And I mean it. I have friends who are much nastier than me who will come and find you. You have been warned.

Okay, wow. Well, here’s a question you’ll really despise: Has playing Jean-Luc Picard taught you anything about Macbeth?

Why do you think that’s a stupid question? Look, I played that character for seven years, 178 episodes week in, week out, four feature films. Those years were very productive, they were very important to me, and they changed my life in every aspect. I am proud of Star Trek: The Next Generation, I am proud of the work we did, and I am proud of the character I played, because I know for a fact he’s been an outstanding role model to people. Is there any of him in Macbeth? No. There really isn’t. Jean-Luc Picard, supposing he were married to Lady Macbeth — which he would never have been because he is married to the Enterprise, as we all know — he would never have permitted these things to happen because he is not a violent man, and not a man who would put personal ambition before the good of others. Now isn’t that a nice answer?

(Source)

Here's a recent picture of Mr. Stewart (this was taken at a Trek convention in New Jersey in March):

2320991457_8e35af153e.jpg

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I wanted to go to that so badly....And it's true, there really isn't anything like a Shakespeare play with Patrick Stewart! I just hop he can perform at a venue closer to me...maybe Philadelphia.

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I wanted to go to that so badly....And it's true, there really isn't anything like a Shakespeare play with Patrick Stewart! I just hop he can perform at a venue closer to me...maybe Philadelphia.

Yeah, you missed Brent Spiner asking Mr. Stewart some really really odd questions... I just love their bickering! look here. :biggrin:

Hmm maybe he will do that one day, but his plans for the rest of this year will take him back to England, to Stratford-Upon-Avon, where he will perform in Hamlet. He'll play Claudius (he already did that back in 1980 for a BBC production), Hamlet's evil uncle. :thumbsup2: There are also rumors that this play will immediately transfer to London then. Maybe it'll then come to the US as well, who knows? :thumbsup2:

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Excellent Mrs P!

Here's something that caused me quite a bit of consternation this past weekend.

First here's the article that got me ALL PO'd!

http://www.newsweek.com/id/129592

Then - here's my reponse in my blog (enjoy) Yeah - I kinda go OFF!

http://www.trekunited.com/community/index....p;showentry=451

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Ah, yes, the newsweek article. I saw it, yes. (It caused quite a few Trekkies to cheer for Mr. Stewart because he was defending them. :thumbup: Mr. Stewart FTW!)

You're right with what you say in your blog, Terilynn... especially with the "should do more research before interviewing someone". That woman should have known that, if she tried to make fun of Trekkies, Mr. Stewart would NOT be pleased. He has repeatedly stated that he thinks Trekkies are normal persons, just like everyone else (why shouldn't they be???) and yes, he knows that there are enthusiasts who walk around wearing uniforms all day long (that's why he was not in the "Trekkies" movies, he didn't like how they implied that ALL Trekkies are like the ones we see in those movies), but he clearly says they're in the minority and that the fact that someone likes Star Trek doesn't make him/her strange in any way.

But, as you said, that woman did NOT do any research, she tried to make him join her in making fun of Trekkies, which he - obviously - didn't like. If she had done any research, she wouldn't have asked such a question because he really becomes upset, as he did in the interview.

As for "where did the Trekkie question come from" - well, this happens quite often in interviews with Mr. Stewart. People who interview him tend to ask at least one Star Trek related question. Seems to be required of them or something. I've gotten used to it although I would prefer them not to ask such questions, of course, since there are a lot of other things in Mr. Stewart's career than just Star Trek.

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GO TERRI!!! WOOO! You tell that Newsweek b**** what for!

When I saw the first question about the Tony nomination, I was like, "OH MY GOD!!! Awesome! Totally awesome, I hope he gets the win!" And then the interview goes from his AMAZING performance and Tony nom, to...Trekkies are weird? WTF does this woman know? Like Mr. Stewart says, "do you personally know any of them?" Well, does she? I don't think so...it's people like her who create this stereotype of gawky, obsessive fans. Every outlet of entertainment has their "Trekkie." Look at fans of Star Wars, Lord Of The Rings, comic books, stuff like that. Granted, there are a less-than-a-handful-sized amount of people who are a little too overzealous...but this woman just makes the negative assumption to end all negative assumptions! On the contrary, little miss Newsweek lady...Our fanbase is one that is filled with people who are kind, generous, magnanimous, and more down to earth than your so-called "normal" people. It is people like you, miss Newsweek, that causes the polarization between people in general. Because we are not like you, because we do not think like you do (Perhaps we think better than you! I'd like to think so!), because we're kind and compassionate people...YOU have to go on and say that we're weird. YOU have to say that there's something wrong with us, when in fact, there is something wrong with YOU. When and if a Trek fan were to attend a show featuring Mr. Stewart, it's because a) We respect Mr. Stewart as an actor, performer and person and b) We enjoy his performances in everything he does. He happens to be one of the greatest and most versatile actors of our time...and I'll be DAMNED that he will allow you to criticize the very people who have been the boon of his success for the past 21 years! We love and respect Mr. Stewart, and he loves and respects us...the feelings are mutual, and if that's a little wacky, a little odd for you...TOUGH SHIT!

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^Agreed. And I do know that journalists can't resist it. I just think it's funny that most Trekkies I know, if put into the same position as this "journalist", wouldn't have been so tempted to ask a "trekkie" question. The man is an extraordinary talent, and has been honored with a Tony nod and only ONE of her questions revolved around that? Another question revolves around the cliche Macbeth superstitions and the remainder are all about Trek.

She was insulting to not just Trekkies, but to him as well. The title of the article was appalling. "Mr. Stewart Loves his Trekkies...." Like somehow that's a BAD thing! Not one reference to the play in the title - she never intended to interview him about his stage show - she only wanted to get the cheap anti-Trek questions in so she could sell it.

I just wanted her to know I saw through the veneer of her questions and that I thought she was a fool. :)

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Yeah, quite a few people were outraged by the interview... ;)

I mean I also dislike it if someone tries to "make Mr. Stewart say bad things about Star Trek", which is precisely what that woman did, she tried to make him say "yeah, weird Trekkies, OMG, leave me alone with them blah blah blah..." :thumbdown: I'm very protective when it comes to him, but there's no need to, obviously, he can defend himself (and us Trekkies) quite well. :thumbsup2:

Although there were a few negative side effects that came with his success... but he tends to think that the positive ones outweigh them. There have been interviews in which he said that TNG kept him away from the stage for quite a few years, which some reporters turned into "STEWART BLAMES STAR TREK FOR..." headlines. :glare:

He just told the truth, TNG did keep him away from the stage... it seems some reporters simply want to hear him say "I hate Star Trek because blah blah blah..." :thumbdown: He is a stage actor, after all, and his true home is on some stage in some theater, if those reporters can't accept that, they should just... well... pardon the expression... shut up. :glare:

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Yeah, quite a few people were outraged by the interview... ;)

I mean I also dislike it if someone tries to "make Mr. Stewart say bad things about Star Trek", which is precisely what that woman did, she tried to make him say "yeah, weird Trekkies, OMG, leave me alone with them blah blah blah..." :thumbdown: I'm very protective when it comes to him, but there's no need to, obviously, he can defend himself (and us Trekkies) quite well. :thumbsup2:

Although there were a few negative side effects that came with his success... but he tends to think that the positive ones outweigh them. There have been interviews in which he said that TNG kept him away from the stage for quite a few years, which some reporters turned into "STEWART BLAMES STAR TREK FOR..." headlines. :glare:

He just told the truth, TNG did keep him away from the stage... it seems some reporters simply want to hear him say "I hate Star Trek because blah blah blah..." :thumbdown: He is a stage actor, after all, and his true home is on some stage in some theater, if those reporters can't accept that, they should just... well... pardon the expression... shut up. :glare:

And grow up. :)

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If he says "yes, TNG kept me away from the stage" - they say "He blames Star Trek for not being able to perform in quite a few plays!"

If he defends TNG and its fans, they say "He loves weird people like Trekkies!"

Whatever he says, they turn it against him. I've gotten used to it somehow... although it's been hard, I can assure you that. :glare:

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They should shut up. To Mr. Stewart, he's a stage actor first and Captain Picard second. He never once said he hated Trek for keeping him away from the stage...he only said that it did keep him away, that's all. I think that he's quite comfortable and pleased with the fact that after the stage, after Trek...he'll always have his fans; who're always there to support him. I think that he's quite pleased with that...that we are here for him, and he's here for us.

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So there. Uh. :)

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The very fact Patrick Stewart appeared in Extras the way he did just goes to show his attitude to Star Trek and the acting profession: it's all just good fun!

That's the healthy way to look at things!

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They should shut up. To Mr. Stewart, he's a stage actor first and Captain Picard second. He never once said he hated Trek for keeping him away from the stage...he only said that it did keep him away, that's all. I think that he's quite comfortable and pleased with the fact that after the stage, after Trek...he'll always have his fans; who're always there to support him. I think that he's quite pleased with that...that we are here for him, and he's here for us.

He never even once said he hates Star Trek. There was a time when he was tired of it, yes, that was right after "All Good Things..." and "Generations" (which was shot right after "All Good Things...", so he didn't even have time to relax a little. And remember, he also directed "Preemptive Strike", the episode before "All Good Things...". He had one hell of a lot of work back then). He was very exhausted back then and he was eager to do something completely different, and that's what he said in a few interviews, that he wanted to get away from the 'Picard image', because he was afraid that NO one would ever want him to play anything else than Picard.

So that's why he accepted the role of Sterling, the gay interior designer in the movie "Jeffrey" (one of my favorites, btw) - he wanted to get away from his 'Picard image'. Some reporters didn't like that and started a "Stewart hates Trek" - rant. Today, people STILL tell me "Ah, I once read that P. Stewart hates Star Trek..." the damage is done, I guess. *sigh*

He's still overwhelmed by all the affection he gets from fans, btw. ;) It took him a long time to come to terms with the fact that he was so popular, and he still has some difficulty with it today, which is why he tends to be kinda 'shy' from time to time.

@ Captain Archer

Oh yes, I think that was his funniest appearance EVER (well, aside from that on "Frasier"). It still makes me laugh whenever I watch it on DVD. :thumbup:

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"You're single... live with your parents... and you've never seen Star Trek...?"

"No."

"Right..."

:biggrin:

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His bit part in LA Story was also one of my favorites - the maitre'd in the restaurant L'Idiot? I almost peed my pants. If you've never seen that movie it's great - if you're from LA and have never seen it? You're comitting a mortal sin.

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"You're single... live with your parents... and you've never seen Star Trek...?"

"No."

"Right..."

:biggrin:

Hehe but it went more like this:

"You're not married, you haven't got a girlfriend... and you've never watched Star Trek?"

"No."

"Good Lord."

No, I don't know it by heart. Of course not! :angel_not:

@ Terilynn

Oooh yes. "LA Story". Another funny Mr. Stewart appearance. "You can't have se duck. You can have se chicken." :laugh::laugh::laugh: Notice his horrible French accent. That's why they quickly decided NOT have Jean-Luc speak with a French accent back then when he was cast for the role of Picard. :laugh:

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Hehe but it went more like this:

"You're not married, you haven't got a girlfriend... and you've never watched Star Trek?"

"No."

"Good Lord."

No, I don't know it by heart. Of course not! :angel_not:

I knew I'd got it wrong, was hoping for your expert knowledge! :biggrin:

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I knew I'd got it wrong, was hoping for your expert knowledge! :biggrin:

Oh, I'm not an expert, not yet... I try to know as much as possible, though. But until I can call myself an expert, I'll call myself... obsessed. :angel_not::laugh:

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I think the very first thing that I saw him in was "Robin Hood: Men in Tights", as King Richard. He only had a few minutes of screentime, but those were some pretty hilarious few minutes :) And recently I finally got around to watching "The Christmas Carol" with him as Scrooge. Wonderful, wonderful actor.

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The Hallmark TV movie, right? Everything about his performance was great. The only thing that was slightly questionable was his laughter at the end. After he returned to his bedroom on Christmas Day, seeing him look like he was choking only to find that he was trying to laugh was kinda funny, if not a little odd. I enjoyed his Christmas Carol outing...but my favorite incarnation is the 1984 George C. Scott version.

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I think the very first thing that I saw him in was "Robin Hood: Men in Tights", as King Richard. He only had a few minutes of screentime, but those were some pretty hilarious few minutes :) And recently I finally got around to watching "The Christmas Carol" with him as Scrooge. Wonderful, wonderful actor.

Oh yes, "Robin Hood"... I didn't care much for the movie itself (it just doesn't match my sense of humor, I guess), but Mr. Stewart as King Richard was great. :thumbsup2: However, it bugged me that I had to wait THE ENTIRE MOVIE for him to appear in just one short scene at the end! *aaaack* *lol*

Yes, "A Christmas Carol", another favorite of mine. I'm a huge fan of Ebenezer Scrooge (BEFORE those ghosts visit him, though).

The Hallmark TV movie, right? Everything about his performance was great. The only thing that was slightly questionable was his laughter at the end. After he returned to his bedroom on Christmas Day, seeing him look like he was choking only to find that he was trying to laugh was kinda funny, if not a little odd. I enjoyed his Christmas Carol outing...but my favorite incarnation is the 1984 George C. Scott version.

I love the scene at the end when he's laughing. It looks kinda insane. :laugh:

****************************

News, folks! Last night was the official opening night of Macbeth on Broadway, and Mr. Stewart attended the party, of course.

PS.jpg

(It is very rare to see him wearing glasses, btw.)

And... the critics ALL HAIL MACBETH!!! :thumbsup2:

What makes this one a must-see is Mr. Stewart’s thrilling recognition that his character is as close kin to the fatally introspective Hamlet as he is to power-wielding men of ill will like Richard III. His performance is the first I have seen to realize completely what the scholar Harold Bloom means when he calls this play “a tragedy of the imagination.”

Click here and then on AUDIO SLIDE SHOW in order to listen to Mr. Stewart talking about Macbeth

Stewart comes close to achieving something extraordinary, and for a play with so many perplexities in performance, that is an exceptional credit in an already exceptional career.

Source

Stewart delivers a fascinatingly complex performance in the title role, cannily hinting at the character's initial hesitancy and vulnerability before adopting a more fearsome demeanor. He also injects welcome doses of casual humor, including his fussy preparation of a sandwich even while plotting a murder with his cohorts.

Source

But in Goold's production, which premiered at the U.K.'s Chichester Festival Theatre and later ran in London and at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Stewart looks as lean and spry as a decathlete. He's an older Macbeth, certainly, but a well-preserved one.

Source

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Now I'm aging myself....and Mr. Stewart. The first thing I ever saw him in was my favorite movie - Excalibur. Again - on a horse. What is it with me with handsome men on horses? :rolleyes:

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Now I'm aging myself....and Mr. Stewart. The first thing I ever saw him in was my favorite movie - Excalibur. Again - on a horse. What is it with me with handsome men on horses? :rolleyes:

Aaaah, "Excalibur", yes. Another great movie, another minor (but still nice) role for Mr. Stewart.

Leodegrance.jpg

His scenes were very difficult to shoot, btw. He once said he had to sit on that horse for HOURS in the rain because the director of the movie was never really satisfied... and he had to wear that knight's armor... ouch. It was definitely NOT very pleasant for him. ;)

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I can well imagine. It was a very gritty film...But - he looked good.

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