Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Admiral Harmon

Shouldn't Picard have been at least temporarily relieved of duty?

57 posts in this topic

I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

Riker would have listened but others in the fleet would have been like "not this time, Locutus". There are no doubt a LOT of folks who blame Jean-Luc for Wolf 359 (I'm trying not to say something really harsh about them now) and many of them would not have been willing to listen until it's too late. The Borg are an extremely touchy subject, and Jean-Luc has a lot of friends in Starfleet but also a lot of enemies on all levels. They never go much into detail on this except when Sisko encounters him and when Nechayev scolds him for sending Hugh back the way he did, but I'm willing to bet that he is NOT everyone's darling when it comes to the Borg. (Victim shaming is unfortunately still alive and well in the 24th century.)

Not to disagree with the expert (hehe) but I just can't see a Starfleet (even only a vocal minority) that has lost confidence in Picard giving him command of two flagships.   And I would imagine that his saving Earth's (and history's) butt yet again in FC would've more than validated their faith in him.

And even Sisko made his peace with Picard by the end of "Emissary." 

Though I do agree that victim shaming (all too alive and well in the 21st century) will probably survive into the 24th.  There would indeed be a vocal minority who would probably think Picard is a 'traitor' for Wolf 359, but I would imagine they are not the ones making the important decisions in Starfleet or Federation policy implementation.  Every workplace has its bitter malcontents...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

Riker would have listened but others in the fleet would have been like "not this time, Locutus". There are no doubt a LOT of folks who blame Jean-Luc for Wolf 359 (I'm trying not to say something really harsh about them now) and many of them would not have been willing to listen until it's too late. The Borg are an extremely touchy subject, and Jean-Luc has a lot of friends in Starfleet but also a lot of enemies on all levels. They never go much into detail on this except when Sisko encounters him and when Nechayev scolds him for sending Hugh back the way he did, but I'm willing to bet that he is NOT everyone's darling when it comes to the Borg. (Victim shaming is unfortunately still alive and well in the 24th century.)

Not to disagree with the expert (hehe) but I just can't see a Starfleet (even only a vocal minority) that has lost confidence in Picard giving him command of two flagships.   And I would imagine that his saving Earth's (and history's) butt yet again in FC would've more than validated their faith in him.

And even Sisko made his peace with Picard by the end of "Emissary." 

Though I do agree that victim shaming (all too alive and well in the 21st century) will probably survive into the 24th.  There would indeed be a vocal minority who would probably think Picard is a 'traitor' for Wolf 359, but I would imagine they are not the ones making the important decisions in Starfleet or Federation policy implementation.  Every workplace has its bitter malcontents...

Oh I do agree with you that he is highly estimated and respected - I was only referring to the Borg specifically. Any other assignment and they'd take him as commander of ANY fleet or ship. (The haters would indeed be a tiny minority here.) It's just the Borg I was talking about - this is the one touchy subject for a majority in Starfleet, so touchy that it made them tell him "no, not YOU" before that First Contact battle. If they had battled the Tholians or the Dominion or whoever else, no one would have hesitated to send Jean-Luc.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

Riker would have listened but others in the fleet would have been like "not this time, Locutus". There are no doubt a LOT of folks who blame Jean-Luc for Wolf 359 (I'm trying not to say something really harsh about them now) and many of them would not have been willing to listen until it's too late. The Borg are an extremely touchy subject, and Jean-Luc has a lot of friends in Starfleet but also a lot of enemies on all levels. They never go much into detail on this except when Sisko encounters him and when Nechayev scolds him for sending Hugh back the way he did, but I'm willing to bet that he is NOT everyone's darling when it comes to the Borg. (Victim shaming is unfortunately still alive and well in the 24th century.)

Not to disagree with the expert (hehe) but I just can't see a Starfleet (even only a vocal minority) that has lost confidence in Picard giving him command of two flagships.   And I would imagine that his saving Earth's (and history's) butt yet again in FC would've more than validated their faith in him.

And even Sisko made his peace with Picard by the end of "Emissary." 

Though I do agree that victim shaming (all too alive and well in the 21st century) will probably survive into the 24th.  There would indeed be a vocal minority who would probably think Picard is a 'traitor' for Wolf 359, but I would imagine they are not the ones making the important decisions in Starfleet or Federation policy implementation.  Every workplace has its bitter malcontents...

Oh I do agree with you that he is highly estimated and respected - I was only referring to the Borg specifically. Any other assignment and they'd take him as commander of ANY fleet or ship. (The haters would indeed be a tiny minority here.) It's just the Borg I was talking about - this is the one touchy subject for a majority in Starfleet, so touchy that it made them tell him "no, not YOU" before that First Contact battle. If they had battled the Tholians or the Dominion or whoever else, no one would have hesitated to send Jean-Luc.

 

Or to negotiate a peace with them... he excels at that, too!  :thumbup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

Riker would have listened but others in the fleet would have been like "not this time, Locutus". There are no doubt a LOT of folks who blame Jean-Luc for Wolf 359 (I'm trying not to say something really harsh about them now) and many of them would not have been willing to listen until it's too late. The Borg are an extremely touchy subject, and Jean-Luc has a lot of friends in Starfleet but also a lot of enemies on all levels. They never go much into detail on this except when Sisko encounters him and when Nechayev scolds him for sending Hugh back the way he did, but I'm willing to bet that he is NOT everyone's darling when it comes to the Borg. (Victim shaming is unfortunately still alive and well in the 24th century.)

Not to disagree with the expert (hehe) but I just can't see a Starfleet (even only a vocal minority) that has lost confidence in Picard giving him command of two flagships.   And I would imagine that his saving Earth's (and history's) butt yet again in FC would've more than validated their faith in him.

And even Sisko made his peace with Picard by the end of "Emissary." 

Though I do agree that victim shaming (all too alive and well in the 21st century) will probably survive into the 24th.  There would indeed be a vocal minority who would probably think Picard is a 'traitor' for Wolf 359, but I would imagine they are not the ones making the important decisions in Starfleet or Federation policy implementation.  Every workplace has its bitter malcontents...

Oh I do agree with you that he is highly estimated and respected - I was only referring to the Borg specifically. Any other assignment and they'd take him as commander of ANY fleet or ship. (The haters would indeed be a tiny minority here.) It's just the Borg I was talking about - this is the one touchy subject for a majority in Starfleet, so touchy that it made them tell him "no, not YOU" before that First Contact battle. If they had battled the Tholians or the Dominion or whoever else, no one would have hesitated to send Jean-Luc.

 

Or to negotiate a peace with them... he excels at that, too!  :thumbup:

Oh, absolutely. In case diplomacy and/or negotiating skills are needed, it's almost a given that Jean-Luc needs to be sent. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

Riker would have listened but others in the fleet would have been like "not this time, Locutus". There are no doubt a LOT of folks who blame Jean-Luc for Wolf 359 (I'm trying not to say something really harsh about them now) and many of them would not have been willing to listen until it's too late. The Borg are an extremely touchy subject, and Jean-Luc has a lot of friends in Starfleet but also a lot of enemies on all levels. They never go much into detail on this except when Sisko encounters him and when Nechayev scolds him for sending Hugh back the way he did, but I'm willing to bet that he is NOT everyone's darling when it comes to the Borg. (Victim shaming is unfortunately still alive and well in the 24th century.)

Not to disagree with the expert (hehe) but I just can't see a Starfleet (even only a vocal minority) that has lost confidence in Picard giving him command of two flagships.   And I would imagine that his saving Earth's (and history's) butt yet again in FC would've more than validated their faith in him.

And even Sisko made his peace with Picard by the end of "Emissary." 

Though I do agree that victim shaming (all too alive and well in the 21st century) will probably survive into the 24th.  There would indeed be a vocal minority who would probably think Picard is a 'traitor' for Wolf 359, but I would imagine they are not the ones making the important decisions in Starfleet or Federation policy implementation.  Every workplace has its bitter malcontents...

Oh I do agree with you that he is highly estimated and respected - I was only referring to the Borg specifically. Any other assignment and they'd take him as commander of ANY fleet or ship. (The haters would indeed be a tiny minority here.) It's just the Borg I was talking about - this is the one touchy subject for a majority in Starfleet, so touchy that it made them tell him "no, not YOU" before that FiOh, absolutely. In case diplomacy and/or negotiating skills are needed, it's almost a given that Jean-Luc needs to be sent. 

Yeah, considering he even talked Riker and LaForge out of transferring Barclay, over both of their objections. There was no one more qualified at negotiations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

Riker would have listened but others in the fleet would have been like "not this time, Locutus". There are no doubt a LOT of folks who blame Jean-Luc for Wolf 359 (I'm trying not to say something really harsh about them now) and many of them would not have been willing to listen until it's too late. The Borg are an extremely touchy subject, and Jean-Luc has a lot of friends in Starfleet but also a lot of enemies on all levels. They never go much into detail on this except when Sisko encounters him and when Nechayev scolds him for sending Hugh back the way he did, but I'm willing to bet that he is NOT everyone's darling when it comes to the Borg. (Victim shaming is unfortunately still alive and well in the 24th century.)

Not to disagree with the expert (hehe) but I just can't see a Starfleet (even only a vocal minority) that has lost confidence in Picard giving him command of two flagships.   And I would imagine that his saving Earth's (and history's) butt yet again in FC would've more than validated their faith in him.

And even Sisko made his peace with Picard by the end of "Emissary." 

Though I do agree that victim shaming (all too alive and well in the 21st century) will probably survive into the 24th.  There would indeed be a vocal minority who would probably think Picard is a 'traitor' for Wolf 359, but I would imagine they are not the ones making the important decisions in Starfleet or Federation policy implementation.  Every workplace has its bitter malcontents...

Oh I do agree with you that he is highly estimated and respected - I was only referring to the Borg specifically. Any other assignment and they'd take him as commander of ANY fleet or ship. (The haters would indeed be a tiny minority here.) It's just the Borg I was talking about - this is the one touchy subject for a majority in Starfleet, so touchy that it made them tell him "no, not YOU" before that FiOh, absolutely. In case diplomacy and/or negotiating skills are needed, it's almost a given that Jean-Luc needs to be sent. 

Yeah, considering he even talked Riker and LaForge out of transferring Barclay, over both of their objections. There was no one more qualified at negotiations.

He even out-Sheliak'ed the Sheliak. Given how very well I know what it's like when you're surrounded by bureaucrats who quote contracts and rules and regulations at you all the time, I can say for SURE that this is one of Jean-Luc's greatest achievements. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As we say in the US, Picard gave the Sheliak a good shellacking. :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0