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Admiral Harmon

Shouldn't Picard have been at least temporarily relieved of duty?

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^ I agree that the interval between BOBW and Family seems more like a few weeks, about the time of a Starbase layover/overhaul.  The ship was damaged; but they probably also wanted to give ALL of the crew (including the captain) leave to deal with what had happened.   A few weeks at Earth would seem to be just the thing for that.
 
Regarding Picard's ongoing struggle with his feelings about the Borg:  I've no doubt he struggled with it long afterward, beyond what we saw in "I, Borg" and FC.   I think FC gave Picard some closure since he literally killed the source of his pain; a cathartic release.  But even revenge doesn't necessarily eliminate trauma.  Human beings aren't such simple creatures.   Even after 'the bad guys' are gone, the damage they inflict can last a lifetime.   But Picard is stable and strong enough not to let that trauma interfere with his judgment or command.
 
Kirk also faced a similar crisis of judgment in "Obsession," when his senior officers questioned his ability to command based on his Ahab-attitude regarding the Vampire cloud creature.  Like Picard in FC, Kirk was proven right (even if his crew wasn't as sure of him as Picard's in FC).  Kirk demonstrated questionable behavior in that episode, such as confining security chief Garrovick to quarters because he delayed firing at the cloud creature for a couple of seconds, even AFTER phasers were proven ineffective against it (??).   That decision was based solely on Kirk's own guilt, not rationality or good judgment.   And the events of "Obsession" took place 11 years after Kirk first faced the creature; but it still haunted his judgment.  
 
Was Kirk relieved of command after "Obsession"?  Were mandatory therapy sessions ordered on him?  No, and no.
 
So why is Picard held to a different standard?

Because for some fans, Kirk is the strong macho man and Jean-Luc is the weak French dude who surrenders during his first mission. This is the image that is sometimes STILL distributed in the fandom.

Jean-Luc will always be scarred by the Borg although I do agree that First Contact offered some closure indeed. But he will always have nightmares, they will lessen, but he will still wake up in the middle of the night sometimes, drenched in sweat because in his dream the Borg just chased him.  

It's also interesting how his PTSD is transferred to those around him. His crew literally follows him no matter what, no matter how misguided he is (like in I Borg and First Contact) and it always takes an outsider (Guinan and Lily) to snap him out of it. His crew suffers along with him, almost. I do as well, even, after so many years of loving him, his trauma has definitely influenced me as well. 

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Ah! Okay. Hmm. The movie still makes it clear that it's Jean-Luc Starfleet Command has an issue with, but then I guess we never know what's really going on in their minds...

And I certainly hope they'd assume he UNKNOWINGLY added Borg technology... I mean anything else would just make me want to punch the next admiral in my path even more. The man is traumatized enough, he's been through so much and yet continues to dedicate his life to Starfleet and yet they throw these accusations at him... the worst thing is that I can actually PICTURE some smug admiral doing exactly that.

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Borg tech is nano tech. Easy to miss. I can see Star Fleet being Wary of the whole situation. 

In the BoBW didn't borg drones beam on to the Enterprise and take Picard. If they beamed on once, couldn't they have beamed something else on that's very tiny and been in hiding the whole time. Picard says he's the problem but does he really know what their thinking? The Enterprise is only one ship. If the Federation Techs missed some Borg technology in Picard or in the ship or even in another crew member, it could prove dangerous. Why take a risk, even if it is a tiny risk, for just one ship? Picard later proves that thinking wrong. 

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Borg tech is nano tech. Easy to miss. I can see Star Fleet being Wary of the whole situation. 

In the BoBW didn't borg drones beam on to the Enterprise and take Picard. If they beamed on once, couldn't they have beamed something else on that's very tiny and been in hiding the whole time. Picard says he's the problem but does he really know what their thinking? The Enterprise is only one ship. If the Federation Techs missed some Borg technology in Picard or in the ship or even in another crew member, it could prove dangerous. Why take a risk, even if it is a tiny risk, for just one ship? Picard later proves that thinking wrong. 

Yeah but the Borg take him from the Enterprise-D in BOBW. In First Contact we are on the Enterprise-E. Two different ships. (Or am I missing something here. lol)

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Borg tech is nano tech. Easy to miss. I can see Star Fleet being Wary of the whole situation. 

In the BoBW didn't borg drones beam on to the Enterprise and take Picard. If they beamed on once, couldn't they have beamed something else on that's very tiny and been in hiding the whole time. Picard says he's the problem but does he really know what their thinking? The Enterprise is only one ship. If the Federation Techs missed some Borg technology in Picard or in the ship or even in another crew member, it could prove dangerous. Why take a risk, even if it is a tiny risk, for just one ship? Picard later proves that thinking wrong. 

Yeah but the Borg take him from the Enterprise-D in BOBW. In First Contact we are on the Enterprise-E. Two different ships. (Or am I missing something here. lol)

I forgot about that. My mistake.

I wonder how much was transferred from the Enterprise-D to the Enterprise-E? Personal crew belongings and so forth. If you're paranoid about the Borg enough, any excuse might be enough.  I could see one admiral so terrified of the Borg that they are not willing to take any kind of risk. 

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Borg tech is nano tech. Easy to miss. I can see Star Fleet being Wary of the whole situation. 

In the BoBW didn't borg drones beam on to the Enterprise and take Picard. If they beamed on once, couldn't they have beamed something else on that's very tiny and been in hiding the whole time. Picard says he's the problem but does he really know what their thinking? The Enterprise is only one ship. If the Federation Techs missed some Borg technology in Picard or in the ship or even in another crew member, it could prove dangerous. Why take a risk, even if it is a tiny risk, for just one ship? Picard later proves that thinking wrong. 

Yeah but the Borg take him from the Enterprise-D in BOBW. In First Contact we are on the Enterprise-E. Two different ships. (Or am I missing something here. lol)

I forgot about that. My mistake.

I wonder how much was transferred from the Enterprise-D to the Enterprise-E? Personal crew belongings and so forth. If you're paranoid about the Borg enough, any excuse might be enough.  I could see one admiral so terrified of the Borg that they are not willing to take any kind of risk. 

I can see something like that as well, it might have been part of the conversation Jean-Luc apparently has with Starfleet Command at the beginning of First Contact. We never see that conversation, but he's VERY, very hurt by it, so I guess it is possible they did accuse him of being a secret Borg agent and who knows what else. The bottom line is that they think HE is the reason why the Enterprise should not be sent to fight the Borg, whether this is because he might have involuntarily added Borg technology to the ship or "just" because of his special connection to the Borg remains a bit of a mystery indeed. 

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Borg tech is nano tech. Easy to miss. I can see Star Fleet being Wary of the whole situation. 

In the BoBW didn't borg drones beam on to the Enterprise and take Picard. If they beamed on once, couldn't they have beamed something else on that's very tiny and been in hiding the whole time. Picard says he's the problem but does he really know what their thinking? The Enterprise is only one ship. If the Federation Techs missed some Borg technology in Picard or in the ship or even in another crew member, it could prove dangerous. Why take a risk, even if it is a tiny risk, for just one ship? Picard later proves that thinking wrong. 

Yeah but the Borg take him from the Enterprise-D in BOBW. In First Contact we are on the Enterprise-E. Two different ships. (Or am I missing something here. lol)

I forgot about that. My mistake.

I wonder how much was transferred from the Enterprise-D to the Enterprise-E? Personal crew belongings and so forth. If you're paranoid about the Borg enough, any excuse might be enough.  I could see one admiral so terrified of the Borg that they are not willing to take any kind of risk. 

I can see something like that as well, it might have been part of the conversation Jean-Luc apparently has with Starfleet Command at the beginning of First Contact. We never see that conversation, but he's VERY, very hurt by it, so I guess it is possible they did accuse him of being a secret Borg agent and who knows what else. The bottom line is that they think HE is the reason why the Enterprise should not be sent to fight the Borg, whether this is because he might have involuntarily added Borg technology to the ship or "just" because of his special connection to the Borg remains a bit of a mystery indeed. 

I can see three groups at Star Fleet Command. The medical people say that Picard is fine. Another group says that his experience would be useful. A third group remembers the damage the Borg caused and are terrified that it will happen again. The third group is the smallest of the three but the most vocal and insistent so they get their way but only up to a point. Picard talked to one of the admirals in the third group that want to throw him out of Starfleet just to be safe but has been overruled by the majority who know that Starfleet is much stronger with Picard than without him. 

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Borg tech is nano tech. Easy to miss. I can see Star Fleet being Wary of the whole situation. 

In the BoBW didn't borg drones beam on to the Enterprise and take Picard. If they beamed on once, couldn't they have beamed something else on that's very tiny and been in hiding the whole time. Picard says he's the problem but does he really know what their thinking? The Enterprise is only one ship. If the Federation Techs missed some Borg technology in Picard or in the ship or even in another crew member, it could prove dangerous. Why take a risk, even if it is a tiny risk, for just one ship? Picard later proves that thinking wrong. 

Yeah but the Borg take him from the Enterprise-D in BOBW. In First Contact we are on the Enterprise-E. Two different ships. (Or am I missing something here. lol)

I forgot about that. My mistake.

I wonder how much was transferred from the Enterprise-D to the Enterprise-E? Personal crew belongings and so forth. If you're paranoid about the Borg enough, any excuse might be enough.  I could see one admiral so terrified of the Borg that they are not willing to take any kind of risk. 

I can see something like that as well, it might have been part of the conversation Jean-Luc apparently has with Starfleet Command at the beginning of First Contact. We never see that conversation, but he's VERY, very hurt by it, so I guess it is possible they did accuse him of being a secret Borg agent and who knows what else. The bottom line is that they think HE is the reason why the Enterprise should not be sent to fight the Borg, whether this is because he might have involuntarily added Borg technology to the ship or "just" because of his special connection to the Borg remains a bit of a mystery indeed. 

I can see three groups at Star Fleet Command. The medical people say that Picard is fine. Another group says that his experience would be useful. A third group remembers the damage the Borg caused and are terrified that it will happen again. The third group is the smallest of the three but the most vocal and insistent so they get their way but only up to a point. Picard talked to one of the admirals in the third group that want to throw him out of Starfleet just to be safe but has been overruled by the majority who know that Starfleet is much stronger with Picard than without him. 

Yeah that sounds likely. Add to that vocal minority group those admirals who would jump at a chance to get revenge on Jean-Luc any way they can, including through accusing him of being a Borg agent and yup. There we go.

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Then why would Starfleet give him command of the flagship if they were worried about him being a Borg sleeper agent?? 

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Then why would Starfleet give him command of the flagship if they were worried about him being a Borg sleeper agent?? 

Remember that Command did feel that he could been influenced by the Borg unknowingly even as late as the Sector 001 Invasion, but only if he was close to them. But at the same time, I think they assumed that the mind-meld with Sarek could fortify him from long range manipulation.

Is it possible they thought that was why he didn't turn Hugh into a weapon was because of Borg manipulating he decision process?

Edited by Admiral Harmon

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The two weeks between is enough for an evaluation. They determined that Picard was affected but still fully capable. He had sessions with Troy but on his timetable when he needed them or they fit in. Stationing him near the neutral zone may have been the command structure rather than the medical teams decision. There might have been some lingering doubt about the ship itself. Is there some Borg tech buried in the ship ready to be activated?  

The Enterprise-E didn't come across the Borg before the Neutral Zone order, there can't be any Borg technology in there - and it's actuallly mentioned in the movie that it's Jean-Luc who is the problem. He says that Starfleet Command has "every confidence in the Enterprise and her crew, they're just not sure about her captain" and that they basically think he shouldn't be near the Borg again. It's Jean-Luc and Wolf 359, it has really nothing to do with the ship.

WHat I think scenario was saying was perhaos Starfleet felt that Picard had put in Borg tech in the Ent-E, perhaps unknowngly.

Then why would Starfleet give him command of the flagship if they were worried about him being a Borg sleeper agent?? 

Because the medical staff said he isn't. The majority of Star Fleet admirals say he isn't. But a minority of admirals, many of whom are already his enemies (as Mr.Picard pointed out) are afraid with little reason that he might be. They made enough of a fuss that the rest of the admirals gave in.The military mind tends to attract overly paranoid people. It's sometimes even useful. The majority of admirals felt that if hundreds of ships can't stop the Borg, what's one more ship going to do? 

And I agree with Admiral Harmon, if there is a problem with Picard and the Borg it is more likely to happen if they are closer. 

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As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

Edited by Locutus

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As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to tecover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

I always thought that the Borg had targeted and destroyed the ship in charge and the next in line and the next... Any orders from the planet weren't getting through.  After the first 4 or 5 or 10  flagships were destroyed, no one was sure who was in charge. Picard came in and heard ships asking for orders. It was in chaos. No one was in charge. As the captain of the flagship, he took charge. He may not have had the right but the admiral who should have been in charge was either injured, or had no idea that they were in charge. When a voice that every ships captain knew gave them orders to shoot at a particular target, there really wasn't any reason not to obey orders. What they were doing before clearly wasn't working. 

There are incidents in history like this. I vaguely remember a case in the British Navy during the early 1800's where a 12 year old midshipman who was officially the 7th or 8th in line to the captain was sent below by the captain before a battle. All of the officers above him were killed in the battle but no one told him. A non commissioned officer took over. The twelve year old was court marshaled for abandoning his post. 

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As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

^
Which, as Riker pointed out, made him the PERFECT captain to fight them.   And he was proven right in FC.  He knew their vulnerabilities and their strategies better than anyone else could've. 

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As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

^
Which, as Riker pointed out, made him the PERFECT captain to fight them.   And he was proven right in FC.  He knew their vulnerabilities and their strategies better than anyone else could've. 

But if he had been there at the beginning, the Enterprise might have been targeted as a potential problem and destroyed. By coming in when they did, the Borg were occupied enough that they didn't notice the one new ship. 

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As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

^
Which, as Riker pointed out, made him the PERFECT captain to fight them.   And he was proven right in FC.  He knew their vulnerabilities and their strategies better than anyone else could've. 

But if he had been there at the beginning, the Enterprise might have been targeted as a potential problem and destroyed. By coming in when they did, the Borg were occupied enough that they didn't notice the one new ship. 

The Enterprise-E was the most "advanced ship in the fleet"; I'm pretty sure she would've held her own for awhile.  And she might've punched the Borg in their seemingly non-vital but very vulnerable systems a lot sooner; certainly before such heavy casualties were inflicted on the other ships.

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As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

^
Which, as Riker pointed out, made him the PERFECT captain to fight them.   And he was proven right in FC.  He knew their vulnerabilities and their strategies better than anyone else could've. 

But if he had been there at the beginning, the Enterprise might have been targeted as a potential problem and destroyed. By coming in when they did, the Borg were occupied enough that they didn't notice the one new ship. 

The Enterprise-E was the most "advanced ship in the fleet"; I'm pretty sure she would've held her own for awhile.  And she might've punched the Borg in their seemingly non-vital but very vulnerable systems a lot sooner; certainly before such heavy casualties were inflicted on the other ships.

She's the most advanced ship but a concentrated hit by all the weapons on a Borg cube. One or two shots maybe. A full broadside, I'm not so sure. 

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As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

^
Which, as Riker pointed out, made him the PERFECT captain to fight them.   And he was proven right in FC.  He knew their vulnerabilities and their strategies better than anyone else could've. 

 

As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

^
Which, as Riker pointed out, made him the PERFECT captain to fight them.   And he was proven right in FC.  He knew their vulnerabilities and their strategies better than anyone else could've. 

He was proven right, but hindsight is 20-20.  I don't think it was an easy choice, and I do not fault Starfleet top brass for the call they made.  Imagine if Picard went all Locutus again ... not so hard to imagine.  My namesake absolutely devastated the fleet.  That, the Federation could not afford.

I do fault Starfleet for not turning command over to Riker and sending the Enterprise-E in under his command.  He is a capable Captain, and the Enterprise the most advanced ship in the fleet.  Picard could have monitored and advised from afar.

Edited by Locutus

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As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

^
Which, as Riker pointed out, made him the PERFECT captain to fight them.   And he was proven right in FC.  He knew their vulnerabilities and their strategies better than anyone else could've. 

 

As I recall, all we really get in First Contact is that to have him near the battle would introduce "an unstable element to a crirical situation."  After seeing how Picard is able to listen to and hear the Borg chatter during the battle (or was he recalling something from his memory), I completely understood Starfleet's concern.  If they are still literally in his head, what is to say they could not coerce or manipulate him against his will again.  As it turned out, they could not, but there is no question that the result of him being there was very unpredictable.  

In fact, given that he was violating orders just being there, I was a little shocked that he just says "I am taking command of the fleet!" and the other ships capitulated.  I always interpreted that as a moment of complete desperation on the part of the other captains.  They would try just about anything that had an outside chance of success because their battle plan was going to shit.  Picard swoops in and tells them to target an apparently non-vital system, the captains were desperate to try anything. 

No doubt, Picard had built up an incredible amount of credibility to be able to take command of the fleet at all.  Nonetheless, it was a moment of desperation.

As for psychiatric trauma in the 24th century, I like to think the science has also advanced considerably.  It may not take months or years to recover mentally from an experience like "Chain of Command."  It may be hard for us to conceive in this day and age, but psychotropic drugs and psychiatric rehabilitation could be incredibly improved in ways we cannot imagine.  

The Borg experience is so unique to Picard though.  He was quite possibly the only person alive in Starfleet recovered from the Borg.

^
Which, as Riker pointed out, made him the PERFECT captain to fight them.   And he was proven right in FC.  He knew their vulnerabilities and their strategies better than anyone else could've. 

He was proven right, but hindsight is 20-20.  I don't think it was an easy choice, and I do not fault Starfleet top brass for the call they made.  Imagine if Picard went all Locutus again ... not so hard to imagine.  My namesake absolutely devastated the fleet.  That, the Federation could not afford.

I do fault Starfleet for not turning command over to Riker and sending the Enterprise-E in under his command.  He is a capable Captain, and the Enterprise the most advanced ship in the fleet.  Picard could have monitored and advised from afar.

I'm trying to push my bias aside (I'd have punched every single person who thought Jean-Luc would turn against Starfleet in a battle against the Borg) but I think it speaks volumes of his integrity and decency to even come to the fleet's aid. I'd have been like "Oh really now? Okay. I'll patrol the Neutral Zone, these arrogant and paranoid Starfleet folks think they can handle the Borg without me and they obviously can't, so let them handle them, I hope they'll think of me when the Borg start cutting through their precious office doors at Starfleet Headquarters". (This is why I'm not Starfleet material, by the way.) He had to help, of course, it's partly his sense of duty and partly his PTSD (not again, must make up for Wolf 359). Because he's Jean-Luc. 

Still though. What is it with this victim-shaming thing? He's the VICTIM of the Borg here and yet people/Starfleet treat(s) him like as if he's the perpetrator. For that alone I'd have told him to switch off the battle transmissions and go on his merry way along the Neutral Zone, let them see how far their anti-Picard attitude gets them. (Spoiler: Not very far.)

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I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

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I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

I really doubt that.

There's no evidence that other starship captains lost faith in Picard.  Maybe a few admirals thought he was the wrong man to fight the Borg, but again; the movie FC proved them very wrong (in fact, that poor judgment cost Admiral Hayes his life).  Picard still seems to have a hell of a lot of respect.  When he came onto the battle at Earth and said, "I'm taking command of the fleet" I don't recall much debate.   

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I just see that if he were there advising right up front, he'd have been ignored. Too many people wouldn't have trusted him. And as soon as the Borg found out he was there, he'd have been a target. By the time they would have been willing to listen, the Enterprise would have been dust. 

Riker would have listened but others in the fleet would have been like "not this time, Locutus". There are no doubt a LOT of folks who blame Jean-Luc for Wolf 359 (I'm trying not to say something really harsh about them now) and many of them would not have been willing to listen until it's too late. The Borg are an extremely touchy subject, and Jean-Luc has a lot of friends in Starfleet but also a lot of enemies on all levels. They never go much into detail on this except when Sisko encounters him and when Nechayev scolds him for sending Hugh back the way he did, but I'm willing to bet that he is NOT everyone's darling when it comes to the Borg. (Victim shaming is unfortunately still alive and well in the 24th century.)

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