Anime Trekker

What's Your Neurodiversity Score?

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Neurodiversity test

Here's my score:

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 176 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 58 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)

poly10a.php?p1=93&p2=63&p3=85&p4=70&p5=9

I have actually been professionally diagnosed as Asperger's (I already told you people that)

What's yours?

Edited by Anime Trekker

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Sim   

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 60 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 146 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

poly10a.php?p1=67&p2=33&p3=47&p4=21&p5=1

 

I don't understand what this graph means/how to read it, though. :P

Edited by Sim

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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 60 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 146 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

poly10a.php?p1=67&p2=33&p3=47&p4=21&p5=1

 

I don't understand what this graph means/how to read it, though. :P

It basically shows how far you are in the Neurotypical/Neurodiverse world as far as skills are concerned.

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Sim   

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 60 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 146 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

poly10a.php?p1=67&p2=33&p3=47&p4=21&p5=1

 

I don't understand what this graph means/how to read it, though. :P

It basically shows how far you are in the Neurotypical/Neurodiverse world as far as skills are concerned.

So I assume the more the graph is on the left side, the more I lean towards neurotypical and the more it's on the right side, I lean towards neurodiverse. Okay.

But it's no either/or thing, is it? I.e. I have 8/10 on neurotypical perception, and 5/10 on neurodiverse perception. What does that say about my perception ...?

Just that I answered 8 out of 10 questions that point towards neurotypical perception, but also 5 out of 10 questions that point towards neurodiverse perception? What does that mean? That I'm both to some extent?

Edited by Sim

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OK, I took it; and I'm surprisingly.... boring. :S

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 66 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 145 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

I used to have mild OCD as a teen (chronic hand washing, obsession with books, etc), but I kind of shed it in my mid 20s.   I've never had unusual difficulty reading faces, body language, etc.   I'm just a garden variety nerd, I guess... :dontgetit: 

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Sim   

OK, I took it; and I'm surprisingly.... boring. :S

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 66 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 145 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

I used to have mild OCD as a teen (chronic hand washing, obsession with books, etc), but I kind of shed it in my mid 20s.   I've never had unusual difficulty reading faces, body language, etc.   I'm just a garden variety nerd, I guess... :dontgetit: 

It's a pity this test only measures "Aspie" tendencies... I'd have loved to know how much of my craziness shines through even when I'm taking my meds. :P

I guess I'm quite a few things, but Asperger is not among them...

Edited by Sim

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OK, I took it; and I'm surprisingly.... boring. :S

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 66 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 145 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

I used to have mild OCD as a teen (chronic hand washing, obsession with books, etc), but I kind of shed it in my mid 20s.   I've never had unusual difficulty reading faces, body language, etc.   I'm just a garden variety nerd, I guess... :dontgetit: 

It's a pity this test only measures "Aspie" tendencies... I'd have loved to know how much of my craziness shines through even when I'm taking my meds. :P

I guess I'm quite a few things, but Asperger is not among them...

Me neither.

I'm almost a bit disappointed that I'm so... dull:S

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Sim   

OK, I took it; and I'm surprisingly.... boring. :S

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 66 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 145 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

I used to have mild OCD as a teen (chronic hand washing, obsession with books, etc), but I kind of shed it in my mid 20s.   I've never had unusual difficulty reading faces, body language, etc.   I'm just a garden variety nerd, I guess... :dontgetit: 

It's a pity this test only measures "Aspie" tendencies... I'd have loved to know how much of my craziness shines through even when I'm taking my meds. :P

I guess I'm quite a few things, but Asperger is not among them...

Me neither.

I'm almost a bit disappointed that I'm so... dull:S

As you mention it, maybe I have the two things as well which you mentioned you had as a teen: I very often wash my hands (always after touching anything that's sticky or fatty in the slightest) and am obsessed with my books (and CDs, and DVDs/BDs)... not sure if it qualifies as OCD already. I can't stand sticky fingers, or just the idea they *might* be sticky (and I might damage my books).

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maneth   

Hmm... Interesting.

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 41 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 173 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical

 

poly10a.php?p1=17&p2=36&p3=14&p4=13&p5=6

I think it's particularly cool that they ask about your country of origin. Culture defines to a large extent what kind of behavior is acceptable in public. In Finland, being bad at small talk is the norm, because our culture hasn't encouraged it. Things are changing somewhat. Most Finns are comfortable with even long silences in the middle of a conversation, in situations where, say, the average American would get flustered.

 

Edited by maneth
Added score for clarity

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Hmm... Interesting.

poly10a.php?p1=17&p2=36&p3=14&p4=13&p5=6

I think it's particularly cool that they ask about your country of origin. Culture defines to a large extent what kind of behavior is acceptable in public. In Finland, being bad at small talk is the norm, because our culture hasn't encouraged it. Things are changing somewhat. Most Finns are comfortable with even long silences in the middle of a conversation, in situations where, say, the average American would get flustered.

 

My wife and I often enjoy what we call 'comfortable silences'; for some it may seem awkward, but for us it's kind of serene.  

I'm a bit of a motormouth with other people, but with her I can just relax and that feels wonderful. 

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maneth   

Yeah, but the thing about Finns is that most of us are comfortable in silences even with strangers. We don't have to fill it with what we call mindless chatter and you call small talk.

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Yeah, but the thing about Finns is that most of us are comfortable in silences even with strangers. We don't have to fill it with what we call mindless chatter and you call small talk.

In the US we call that riding the elevator. :laugh:

Frankly, I get a wee bit uncomfortable when a total stranger strikes up a conversation; here in California, that usually means they want something. :Ferengi: :S

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Are you surprised by your score Mr.P?

Not really, because I know I'm what most "normal" people would consider "very odd" - which is why I have a lot of trouble with making friends in real life, especially these days. It wasn't that bad a few years ago, but the older I get the more I realize how different I am from people my age. They all have very normal lives and aren't married to fictional characters for one thing.

I don't have that many problems here or on other social media, though. I get by fine for the most part there since I'm a writer, not a talker. I can express myself freely in writing, but talking is a whole different matter. I can never find the right words and these days I just prefer to be left alone for the most part (I find comfort in solitude). I can be among strangers/a lot of people, but only for an extremely limited amount of time. Not sure if that isn't "just" social anxiety/avoidance though. I mean I am able to understand and read other people and their emotions - they just make me very uncomfortable if it's too much. I prefer calm and quiet people around me. If, however, I feel comfortable in an environment I can actually be quite "engaging" (haha) and communicative. It has to be a familiar environment, people I meet every day and have gotten used to, following a routine/schedule, etc. THEN I'm fine. I just hate unfamiliar situations, unfamiliar people, strangers, that sort of thing gets to me and makes me really umcomfortable and even terrified sometimes. But as soon as there's a routine and the same people every day? I'm set. I always got by well in school, for example - with both classmates and teachers, in fact, I was always one of the loudest folks. (I remember an English teacher - smilingly - saying to me "if you weren't so brilliant with the English language I'd have kicked you out of my class a long time ago, you and your nitpicky comments") I did always hate kindergarten, though - there was no schedule, no clear way of doing things, and it was just a waste of time in my opinion. (I hated it so much that my grandfather agreed to pick me up at around noon and take me home so that I could spend the rest of the day with him doing interesting things like being in the garden and/or taking care of our stamp collections. Or read, each one of us with a book, he in the living room, I in my little room upstairs. We were both introverts. He understood.)

tl;dr: I'm not surprised, I'm just not sure if it's all 100% accurate. It is probably a good indicator, though.

 

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maneth   

Socially, I'm an ambivert. I do enjoy socializing, sometimes even with a lot strangers, if I'm at a rock concert or sporting event, for example. I do tend to prefer outings with my husband or a few friends to huge parties with dozens of people. But I can deal with those too, as long as I have my husband or a friend with me. I really do not enjoy professional networking events or "cocktail parties", especially if everyone is a stranger. When I do have to go, I tend to get acquainted with one or two people and spend as much time with them as they'll allow, rather than attempting to meet as many new people as possible.

That said, I need a lot of time to myself to relax. After a stressful week at work and at home with my husband and son, my greatest luxury at weekends is to throw them out of the house so I can spend a few hours completely alone.

One problem is that while I can remember faces, retaining names is impossible unless I see it written down, or preferably write it down myself. This is probably aggravated by the fact that Finnish etiquette does not require you to address the person you're speaking with by name, except to catch their attention or when you're introducing yourself. So I haven't learned any memory rules to remember people's names.

In high school I was painfully shy, but I grew out of it in my late teens thanks to joining my school's drama club and going to work as a shop assistant. Both gave me a "role" to hide behind when I had to speak to people who were either complete strangers (at work) or teens I barely knew (other drama club members).

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Socially, I'm an ambivert. I do enjoy socializing, sometimes even with a lot strangers, if I'm at a rock concert or sporting event, for example. I do tend to prefer outings with my husband or a few friends to huge parties with dozens of people. But I can deal with those too, as long as I have my husband or a friend with me. I really do not enjoy professional networking events or "cocktail parties", especially if everyone is a stranger. When I do have to go, I tend to get acquainted with one or two people and spend as much time with them as they'll allow, rather than attempting to meet as many new people as possible.

That said, I need a lot of time to myself to relax. After a stressful week at work and at home with my husband and son, my greatest luxury at weekends is to throw them out of the house so I can spend a few hours completely alone.

One problem is that while I can remember faces, retaining names is impossible unless I see it written down, or preferably write it down myself. This is probably aggravated by the fact that Finnish etiquette does not require you to address the person you're speaking with by name, except to catch their attention or when you're introducing yourself. So I haven't learned any memory rules to remember people's names.

In high school I was painfully shy, but I grew out of it in my late teens thanks to joining my school's drama club and going to work as a shop assistant. Both gave me a "role" to hide behind when I had to speak to people who were either complete strangers (at work) or teens I barely knew (other drama club members).

Surprising number of parallels to my own childhood.

And you and I are about the same comfort level; I prefer small gatherings of a few close friends to large crowds as well.   My wife and I are equally comfortable alone; I love her (very much), but luckily neither of us are emotionally codependent.   We choose to be together; we don't have to be 24/7.   I can function easily as an individual, and so can she. 

And I too was shy in my childhood (stutterer); but outgrew it in my mid-teens thanks to debate and drama classes. 

And Finnish etiquette sounds pretty normal to me.   It takes me a while to get names too; I'm really BAD at names... faces, yes.  Names?  Not so much. :P

Are you surprised by your score Mr.P?

Not really, because I know I'm what most "normal" people would consider "very odd" - which is why I have a lot of trouble with making friends in real life, especially these days. It wasn't that bad a few years ago, but the older I get the more I realize how different I am from people my age. They all have very normal lives and aren't married to fictional characters for one thing.

I don't have that many problems here or on other social media, though. I get by fine for the most part there since I'm a writer, not a talker. I can express myself freely in writing, but talking is a whole different matter. I can never find the right words and these days I just prefer to be left alone for the most part (I find comfort in solitude). I can be among strangers/a lot of people, but only for an extremely limited amount of time. Not sure if that isn't "just" social anxiety/avoidance though. I mean I am able to understand and read other people and their emotions - they just make me very uncomfortable if it's too much. I prefer calm and quiet people around me. If, however, I feel comfortable in an environment I can actually be quite "engaging" (haha) and communicative. It has to be a familiar environment, people I meet every day and have gotten used to, following a routine/schedule, etc. THEN I'm fine. I just hate unfamiliar situations, unfamiliar people, strangers, that sort of thing gets to me and makes me really umcomfortable and even terrified sometimes. But as soon as there's a routine and the same people every day? I'm set. I always got by well in school, for example - with both classmates and teachers, in fact, I was always one of the loudest folks. (I remember an English teacher - smilingly - saying to me "if you weren't so brilliant with the English language I'd have kicked you out of my class a long time ago, you and your nitpicky comments") I did always hate kindergarten, though - there was no schedule, no clear way of doing things, and it was just a waste of time in my opinion. (I hated it so much that my grandfather agreed to pick me up at around noon and take me home so that I could spend the rest of the day with him doing interesting things like being in the garden and/or taking care of our stamp collections. Or read, each one of us with a book, he in the living room, I in my little room upstairs. We were both introverts. He understood.)

tl;dr: I'm not surprised, I'm just not sure if it's all 100% accurate. It is probably a good indicator, though.

 

I think of this test (if one answers honestly) as a 'pointer' in the right direction, but hardly an absolute scale.   

I'm betting that even the shyest of introverts might have that one person that could draw them out, or make them comfortable.  It sounds like your grandfather really understood you.   Sometimes the best thing for an introvert is to know another introvert; that way they can be 'introverted together' (if that makes sense? ;) ).

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I think of this test (if one answers honestly) as a 'pointer' in the right direction, but hardly an absolute scale.   

I'm betting that even the shyest of introverts might have that one person that could draw them out, or make them comfortable.  It sounds like your grandfather really understood you.   Sometimes the best thing for an introvert is to know another introvert; that way they can be 'introverted together' (if that makes sense? ;) ).

Me, too. Its general direction is certainly accurate. It also says "you are MOST LIKELY". It doesn't say "DEFINITELY". (Not that I would be afraid of such a diagnosis or anything, I'd accept it - if it was given to me by a psychologist.)

My grandfather was pretty much the only person who understood me, and the only man who was ever kind to me when I was young. He provided a safe place, and he was a safe person to be around. He was quiet and usually friendly - but also authoritative and clearly the head of the family. What he said was DONE. When he walked into a room, everyone looked at him, despite him being rather short, he didn't have an imposing figure or anything. When he leaned forward in his chair at the head of the table and knocked on the table during family gatherings in order to indicate that things were getting too loud, everyone fell silent and then went on talking in a much more orderly manner. He was also very intelligent, he was an avid reader and whenever I had a question he came up with an answer, if he didn't have one immediately, he looked it up. (No Google yet.) We would often sit there and listen to the news and he would explain the world to me. Or we watched TV together in silence (documentaries and science shows and all). Or we were in his huge garden and he would explain flowers, animals, garden stuff. I didn't have many pleasant moments at home with my parents, but at my grandparents' place my grandfather always tried to make up for it (even though he knew he couldn't). My cousins always feared him and never understood how I could hang out with him so much, especially since he had to rest a lot due to a heart problem and couldn't play soccer with me or anything. But I just found him... incredibly comforting. I'd like to think he felt the same way about me. I don't know, though, I never asked. However, he wasn't the type who enjoyed wasting his time with people he disliked, so there's that.

But yes, even extreme introverts CAN find a comforting person to be with. It just doesn't happen very often. But once we find that person, we tend to stick with that person. ;) 

 

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No real surprises here.  Many of the questions were clearly targeted at much younger participants, especially those related to dating & casual relationships.  How terribly strange to be 70.

 

poly10a.php?p1=52&p2=24&p3=16&p4=11&p5=7

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No real surprises here.  Many of the questions were clearly targeted at much younger participants, especially those related to dating & casual relationships.  How terribly strange to be 70.

 

poly10a.php?p1=52&p2=24&p3=16&p4=11&p5=7

And you look great, Mutai. ;)

And yeah, I had to answer as best I could on dating/crush questions, too (most from either past experience or based on my relationship with my wife).  

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maneth   

Yeah, the dating/crush questions were pretty irrelevant for me too, now. That said, I don't see how they're really all that relevant here, because you can be socially awkward as a teen with a low neurodiverse score, as I was. I was so scared of rejection that I never gave the dating game a chance until I got to college.

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I had trouble with those questions too (I'm not interested in dating at all), especially the one that asked about "the opposite sex". I was like "umm thanks but I'm not very interested in the OPPOSITE sex in the first place when it comes to this whole thing, what is this heteronormativity doing here".

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maneth   

Yeah, I thought it was weird and totally irrelevant. I mean, AFAIK there's no correlation between neurodiversity and whether or not you identify with your biological gender.

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I had trouble with those questions too (I'm not interested in dating at all), especially the one that asked about "the opposite sex". I was like "umm thanks but I'm not very interested in the OPPOSITE sex in the first place when it comes to this whole thing, what is this heteronormativity doing here".

^
I thought it should've been rephrased as 'the gender you are attracted to' which would be 
more specific. 

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