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Anton Yelchin Dies

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Just for clarity (for all) let's keep this thread about Anton Yelchin's untimely passing.   And yes (responding to Kenman's point), let's also shelve talk of recasting/replacing him for another thread, OK?   Feels tacky here. 

Agreed.  I deleted my comment in the recasting part of the discussion.

Thanks.  

I participated in that too, and I don't feel so great about it.

 

No problem.  I did take your suggestion and started another thread on the topic.  If you feel it is too soon for that, you can remove it entirely.

No, that should be fine.  

It's a separate thread.  If others feel it's too soon, they don't have to participate. 

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So very sad.

Question will come up I'm sure of what will they do about Chekov if there are more Trek films after Beyond?

I would write Chekov out; maybe he got that transfer to the USS Reliant a few years early (?).   But recasting would be disrespectful.   

There are many alternative ideas; they could bring in a younger Saavik, or even TAS' Lt. Arex (who replaced Chekov for two years on that show), but recasting Chekov would be hurtful to the memory of Yelchin, who was quite memorable in the part.    From the Tweets I've read, he was beloved by the entire cast (particularly Cho and Urban).   The character should be laid to rest.  This is an alternate timeline.  It doesn't HAVE to follow the events of TOS.   

They've already killed off Spock's mother Amanda and Kirk's father George Kirk, to use precedents.

Personally, I try to put celebrity deaths into perspective because I can separate the fact that I don't know them.

I've never cried at the death of a celebrity.  I've been rattled a few times, like Larry Hagman and Owen Hart, but never cried.  Tears for me are for people actually in my life.  Though of course others react differently, and I don't fault anyone who feels different

Well, I have, and I don't think it's unnatural to mourn the passing of a beloved celebrity any more than it is to mourn victims of a terror attack.  Or even for the loss of a total stranger on the evening news.   I remember grieving once for a child on TV who was forced by her grandmother to run until she died from heart failure (as punishment for lying).  She reminded me of my goddaughter very much, and I actually felt stinging tears just from seeing the girl's picture on TV.   Never met her, but it was tragic all the same. 

I grieved (and shed tears) when Robin Williams died (whom I'd never met) because he was a huge part of my childhood growing up and he gave the world a lot of laughter.   And it hurt like hell when Leonard Nimoy died (and yes, I did meet him).   Same for Ray Bradbury (my favorite author; I felt I 'knew' him from his books and the two occasions where I'd met him in person).    Same for David Bowie.   I don't see why our empathy or sadness has to remain confined ONLY for those we 'know.'   That's a load of bubkes in my book.   If you're grieving over a loss, and the tears come?  Let them come.   There's a reason they're there.  If they don't?  That's fine too.  But I don't think it's out of bounds to mourn a stranger's passing.   

I mourn a loss of talent, a loss of life and for the fact that a particular artist is silenced.  In my opinion, that's more than ample reason for a few tears.  

I'll admit, I haven't cried for Yelchin, but I still grieve for his friends and loved ones all the same.   There is nothing wrong, or inappropriate about grieving for the loss of a celebrity just because you didn't know them personally.  Tears aren't just reserved for family or friends; they're also for anyone whose lives were touched by someone else.   Or not.  Even the tragic loss of total strangers can (and should) move us to tears. 

I like the exchange about loss between Spock & McCoy in TOS' "Immunity Syndrome", when Spock 'feels' the loss of the USS Intrepid's crew:

Mr. Spock: I've noticed that about your people, Doctor. You find it easier to understand the death of one than the death of a million. You speak about the objective hardness of the Vulcan heart, yet how little room there seems to be in yours. 

Dr. McCoy: Suffer the death of thy neighbour, eh, Spock? Now, you wouldn't wish that on us, would you? 

Mr. Spock: It might have rendered your history a bit less bloody. 

 

And with the death of Nimoy, for example, -- but this could apply to many of the celebrities you mentioned--we weep for the part of ourselves that go with them. Kind of like the pain that comes when we lose a grandparent. That part of our past--almost always our youth--that we took for granted in adulthood, that we pretended was still active in our lives, we realize is gone forever. We will never be who we were when we were experiencing these people for the first time, and when we suddenly know that we will never experience them again, it stings.  

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Nimoy still hurts.  

Honestly there are moments when I see him onscreen and find it hard to believe he's not here anymore.

I haven't watched a Bad Robot ST film since the news of Yelchin's death, but I don't think I'm ready to be honest; it's too fresh.  I really enjoyed ST09 and watch it often, but not right now.   

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maneth   

Yeah, I'm still reeling a bit from the shock. More than I did at Nimoy's death to be honest, mainly because Yelchin was so young, with the possibilities of a stellar career ahead of him. Now we'll never know and that's what stings. Old people die and it's sad, but a part of the cycle of life. Young people dying just seems so unfair. YMMV, of course.

I expect that in a months' time when Beyond is released, I'll be more than ready to pay my tributes to Anton by going to see the movie.

Edited by maneth

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kenman   

I was planning on rewatching 2009 probably near the release of Beyond, just to get in the mood.  It will be a poignant thing to see him running through those halls again.  I also feel as though I just need to see more movies he was in, as looking at his filmography, I really hadn't seen much. 

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Yeah, I'm still reeling a bit from the shock. More than I did at Nimoy's death to be honest, mainly because Yelchin was so young, with the possibilities of a stellar career ahead of him. Now we'll never know and that's what stings. Old people die and it's sad, but a part of the cycle of life. Young people dying just seems so unfair. YMMV, of course.

I expect that in a months' time when Beyond is released, I'll be more than ready to pay my tributes to Anton by going to see the movie.

^
Very much this; and I'm a huge Nimoy fan.  But Yelchin was just robbed of so much life... 

 

 

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I'm actually really looking forward to seeing what Anton Yelchin brings to Star Trek Beyond. i think he was a fine wee character actor, and I agree that his early passing stings. I first noticed him in Huff, a Showtime vehicle for Hank Azaria and Oliver Platt which was great and cancelled after only two seasons. He was terrific playing Huff (Azaria)'s son. It'll be bittersweet to see him, knowing that's it - no more of his version of Chekhov. But at least we have this movie to look forward to.

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I'm actually really looking forward to seeing what Anton Yelchin brings to Star Trek Beyond. i think he was a fine wee character actor, and I agree that his early passing stings. I first noticed him in Huff, a Showtime vehicle for Hank Azaria and Oliver Platt which was great and cancelled after only two seasons. He was terrific playing Huff (Azaria)'s son. It'll be bittersweet to see him, knowing that's it - no more of his version of Chekhov. But at least we have this movie to look forward to.

I was tempted to watch ST09 the other night, but I don't think I'm ready to see his smiling face so soon... 

I watched TWOK the night Nimoy died, and it ripped me to shreds. 

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Great piece here by the Guardian's film critic, Peter Bradshaw, on the wider issue of celebrity deaths - includes a link to his actual blog post on Anton Yelchin:

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jun/23/i-never-realised-how-many-articles-i-would-write-in-a-blur-of-tears-peter-bradshaw-on-movie-star-deaths

 

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kenman   

According to reports...the Recall went out just before his death, and he received it in the mail like a week after he died.  That is just the worst.  I feel for his family. Getting that recall notice after a funeral has got to just burn you up.  They deserve to sue...because this was a clear safety hazard that ended a young man's life.

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maneth   

That's just pouring salt in the wounds.

Although to be fair, accidents like this probably wouldn't happen if people used the parking brake even if they leave the engine running for a short stop... So I'm not sure how much of a case the parents actually have.

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That's just pouring salt in the wounds.

Although to be fair, accidents like this probably wouldn't happen if people used the parking brake even if they leave the engine running for a short stop... So I'm not sure how much of a case the parents actually have.

Well, the company actually acknowledged (via the belated recall notice) that there was a defect with this model vehicle, so there's something legal to corroborate the family's claim.  

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kenman   

That's just pouring salt in the wounds.

Although to be fair, accidents like this probably wouldn't happen if people used the parking brake even if they leave the engine running for a short stop... So I'm not sure how much of a case the parents actually have.

There was an actual default on the car.  When the driver may think they've shifted into park, it may still be in Neutral.  That is a huge safety issue, acknowledged by the company. And a man is dead because of it.  That is a case.

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maneth   

That's just pouring salt in the wounds.

Although to be fair, accidents like this probably wouldn't happen if people used the parking brake even if they leave the engine running for a short stop... So I'm not sure how much of a case the parents actually have.

There was an actual default on the car.  When the driver may think they've shifted into park, it may still be in Neutral.  That is a huge safety issue, acknowledged by the company. And a man is dead because of it.  That is a case.

It is indeed. Particularly as the recall notice arrived after his death. If he had received it and failed to comply (easy enough to think "Oh, I'm too busy this week, I'll see to it next week") things would probably have been different.

I just hope that everyone who gets a recall notice due to a fault or defect in their car takes it seriously and actually gets their car serviced. Currently, many people don't take recall notices seriously enough. If they start doing that and it means that further loss of life can be prevented, Yelchin's death will not have been completely in vain.

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