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The worst of the worst Star Trek novels

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Which Star Trek novels were the worst you ever read/tried reading?

I've read almost 300 novels so far, and I'm really not demanding: I don't mind generic stories or mediocre ideas. Yet there are a handful of ST novels that were so bad, I didn't manage to finish them.

One of the worst is the TNG novel "Ghost Ship" by Diane Carey. That's all the more surprising since other novels by Carey are usually okay. Yet this one was so terrible, I had to stop after 80 pages or so: All characters are totally off, it reads like a weird caricature on TNG. Maybe the problem was the novel was the first regular TNG novel, and Carey didn't have much to work with yet? Perhaps she got the job for writing it, right when the pilot was shot, so she had to guess the characters. Anyway, this book is certainly among my top 5 of the "worst of the worst".

The other 4 spots must go to the four TOS novels written by Sondra Marshak and Myrna Culbreath. The only novel I managed reading was "The Prometheus Design", and that one was incredibly bad already. I tried reading their first Bantam Books novel, but stopped after 70 pages or so -- and skipped the three others. What is the problem? Obviously, the two authors don't have anything remotely resembling a writing skill. Or if they do, it's certainly not identifyable from these novels. Or they were on LSD when writing them, I don't know. Their novels read like a weird fever dream of the worst kind, or a bad drug-induced hallucination. How these novels made it past the lectors' quality control is really beyond me.

Honorable mention for a really bad ST novel goes to TOS "Rules of Engagement" by Peter Morwood. Not quite as bad as Marshak/Culbreath, but close. At very least the last third, which is wild action that's very hard to read and doesn't make a lot of sense.

I've sometimes read the VOY novel "Chrysalis" by David Niall Wilson is supposed to be very bad, too, but can't comment on it first hand, because I've not yet tried reading it.

 

The Shatnerverse novels are a special case for me: They're technically well written and well designed, so it's not hard to read them. No complaints in these regards. But all the ideas that presumable stem from William Shatner just totally overextend my suspension of disbelief: Kirk brought back to life by nanoprobes, due to a Romulan-Borg alliance? Sarek is killed because he belongs to a group of eco-terrorists? 65 year old Shatnerkirk defeating both Worf and Data in a fistfight? Seriously?

I don't recognize Kirk as the same character I know from the show and movies, but he was replaced by a Mary Sue alter-ego of *Shatner*, who doesn't have much in common with the beloved hero I know. Including the romantic fantasies of an old man -- does 70 year old Kirk really need a 30 year old lover? Yuck.

Yeah, the Shatnerverse is not my cup of tea. Not the worst of the worst, but pretty bad, IMO.

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The Shatnerverse novels are a special case for me: They're technically well written and well designed, so it's not hard to read them. No complaints in these regards. But all the ideas that presumable stem from William Shatner just totally overextend my suspension of disbelief: Kirk brought back to life by nanoprobes, due to a Romulan-Borg alliance? Sarek is killed because he belongs to a group of eco-terrorists? 65 year old Shatnerkirk defeating both Worf and Data in a fistfight? Seriously?

I don't recognize Kirk as the same character I know from the show and movies, but he was replaced by a Mary Sue alter-ego of *Shatner*, who doesn't have much in common with the beloved hero I know. Including the romantic fantasies of an old man -- does 70 year old Kirk really need a 30 year old lover? Yuck.

Yeah, the Shatnerverse is not my cup of tea. Not the worst of the worst, but pretty bad, IMO.

I totally agree. Ashes of Eden wasn't too bad yet, despite the "romantic fantasies of an old man", but it definitely got worse from there, and totally unbelievable. Sadly, it also left me with an impression that, despite their talent (Federation remains a great novel, even if canon has marched on), the Reeves-Stevens write mostly fan-fiction with a fair amount of fan-wank. Federation and their ENT Season 4 stint demonstrates examples of this, but it's never as bad as their Shatner collaboration (the extent of which has, of course, been wildly speculated upon).

That being said, I can't deny the Montrealer in me was a little proud that the Shatnerverse books honoured the Shat's hometown with a cameo, and that a runabout named the USS St.Lawrence showed up.

As for the other books you described, the only one I read was Ghosts. It was in the nineties, in French, and it was indeed horrible and extremely boring.

Edited by Tupperfan

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does 70 year old Kirk really need a 30 year old lover? Yuck.

That really doesn't bother me, especially in that time when 70 is the new 40 for a human. Even now, if everybody's happy, I'm fine. I don't really try to yuck myself out with thoughts of other people's sex lives.

"Triangle" is utterly atrocious. 

Sadly, it also left me with an impression that, despite their talent (Federation remains a great novel, even if canon has marched on), the Reeves-Stevens write mostly fan-fiction with a fair amount of fan-wank

This.

I've always found them adequate, but rarely "good." 

Edited by prometheus59650

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does 70 year old Kirk really need a 30 year old lover? Yuck.

That really doesn't bother me, especially in that time when 70 is the new 40 for a human. Even now, if everybody's happy, I'm fine. I don't really try to yuck myself out with thoughts of other people's sex lives.

In real life, I usually don't either; but it's not how I picture Kirk, and when Shatner comes into the equation, I just cannot avoid this "yuck" element.

I tolerate Shatner's fantasies well enough, but "having" to read about it is quite another.

Edited by Sim

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does 70 year old Kirk really need a 30 year old lover? Yuck.

That really doesn't bother me, especially in that time when 70 is the new 40 for a human. Even now, if everybody's happy, I'm fine. I don't really try to yuck myself out with thoughts of other people's sex lives.

In real life, I usually don't either; but it's not how I picture Kirk, and when Shatner comes into the equation, I just cannot avoid this "yuck" element.

Yeah, well..once you throw Shatner into it... ;)

Edited by prometheus59650

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Killing Time was essentially a Kirk Spock bromance. Triangle was also, and a KS novel expanded into a story, only with the actual naughty bits nixed.

Vonda McIntyre's novelization of Star Trek 3 set up a romance between Saavik and David that really did not exist, and went on far longer than the movie.

Her novelization of Star Trek 4 didn't even get to the plot of the movie until half way in! Once in San Francisco she spends most of the time with unknowns in the city and not on Kirk and crew.

Ghost Ship was literally the first TNG novel after the show and Carey didn't know what anyone acted like. This went for most of the first season novels.

I have all of the first novels from the late 1970s to the early 2000s, but didn't get a lot of them during 1998 to the present, so off and on I would grab series.

The worst ending of a current novel series was Destiny. Really? They invent an alien race to have them just make the Borg go away? That's sloppy. It was good until the ending.

As for Ashes of Eden, and the graphic novel that also was produced, (and a lot more fun), it wasn't a problem that Shatner would bed some young lady as Kirk. How about in Star Trek VI when Iman smooched with him? "What's with you, Jim?" Heh. Funny that 'she' turned out to be a shape shifter and could have been anything.

The Shatnerverse is indeed its own thing, and they are mostly Judith and Garfield Stevens. I wouldn't say all of them were bad, but the mirror ones were like, oh come on.

Most of the tie in novels that were post Nemesis didn't really do it for me, and I didn't pick up the A time to... saga.

I did get Millennium and the Voyager relaunch.

Demons from the classic Trek era was kind of silly.

Doctor, Doctor was very silly and didn't make much sense.

Enterprise, the First Adventure, and Final Frontier, (the McIntyre giant novels) are hard to read and overlong.

Contagion in TNG was kind of a dumb one too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Killing Time was essentially a Kirk Spock bromance. Triangle was also, and a KS novel expanded into a story, only with the actual naughty bits nixed.

Vonda McIntyre's novelization of Star Trek 3 set up a romance between Saavik and David that really did not exist, and went on far longer than the movie.

Her novelization of Star Trek 4 didn't even get to the plot of the movie until half way in! Once in San Francisco she spends most of the time with unknowns in the city and not on Kirk and crew.

Ghost Ship was literally the first TNG novel after the show and Carey didn't know what anyone acted like. This went for most of the first season novels.

I dunno; I don't remember any other early TNG novel being quite as bad as Carey's "Ghost Ship", and Jean Lorrah's "Survivors" was even rather strong, IMO.

But yeah, many of them were pretty bland, such as "Children of Hamlin" or "Peacekeepers"... but not offensively bad, IMO.

I have all of the first novels from the late 1970s to the early 2000s, but didn't get a lot of them during 1998 to the present, so off and on I would grab series.

The worst ending of a current novel series was Destiny. Really? They invent an alien race to have them just make the Borg go away? That's sloppy. It was good until the ending.

 I liked that ending very much. The Borg are not destroyed or neutralized and left to rot, but absorbed into a better community -- very Star Trek-ish. ;) I'm glad they once and for all ended the Borg stories, and they did it in the best way I could possibly think of.

But alas, tastes vary... :)

As for Ashes of Eden, and the graphic novel that also was produced, (and a lot more fun), it wasn't a problem that Shatner would bed some young lady as Kirk. How about in Star Trek VI when Iman smooched with him? "What's with you, Jim?" Heh. Funny that 'she' turned out to be a shape shifter and could have been anything.

Well, she only did so in STVI because she was a headhunter interested in luring him into a trap. Not because she really was romantically interested. That was the whole idea behind that thing ...?

The Shatnerverse is indeed its own thing, and they are mostly Judith and Garfield Stevens. I wouldn't say all of them were bad, but the mirror ones were like, oh come on.

Most of the tie in novels that were post Nemesis didn't really do it for me, and I didn't pick up the A time to... saga.

I did get Millennium and the Voyager relaunch.

Demons from the classic Trek era was kind of silly.

I read "Demons", but hardly remember it. Guess that means I found it bland, but not so bad I'd remember it as such.

Doctor, Doctor was very silly and didn't make much sense.

That was the one by Diane Duane, about the sentient trees? Okay, it was a bit silly, but I liked it a lot. ;)

Enterprise, the First Adventure, and Final Frontier, (the McIntyre giant novels) are hard to read and overlong.

Contagion in TNG was kind of a dumb one too.

You mean "Contamination" by John Vornholt? I found that one okay, though not remarkable.

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Which Star Trek novels were the worst you ever read/tried reading?

I've read almost 300 novels so far, and I'm really not demanding: I don't mind generic stories or mediocre ideas. Yet there are a handful of ST novels that were so bad, I didn't manage to finish them.

One of the worst is the TNG novel "Ghost Ship" by Diane Carey. That's all the more surprising since other novels by Carey are usually okay. Yet this one was so terrible, I had to stop after 80 pages or so: All characters are totally off, it reads like a weird caricature on TNG. Maybe the problem was the novel was the first regular TNG novel, and Carey didn't have much to work with yet? Perhaps she got the job for writing it, right when the pilot was shot, so she had to guess the characters. Anyway, this book is certainly among my top 5 of the "worst of the worst".

The other 4 spots must go to the four TOS novels written by Sondra Marshak and Myrna Culbreath. The only novel I managed reading was "The Prometheus Design", and that one was incredibly bad already. I tried reading their first Bantam Books novel, but stopped after 70 pages or so -- and skipped the three others. What is the problem? Obviously, the two authors don't have anything remotely resembling a writing skill. Or if they do, it's certainly not identifyable from these novels. Or they were on LSD when writing them, I don't know. Their novels read like a weird fever dream of the worst kind, or a bad drug-induced hallucination. How these novels made it past the lectors' quality control is really beyond me.

 

What I don't like about Prometheus Design is it throws you right into the middle of the story and the reader is left to their own to figure out what the hell is going on. Triangle is just awful. Their Phoenix novels are about as bad.

Yes, Ghost Ship is odd, but as said I give it a pass because if you haven't seen anything of the show how do you know how to write for them (she even has Data angry at Riker). 

I happen to like the ST3 novel as it gives a much needed of why Saavik and David are on Grissom, and I think their fling added to it. 

Gene's novel of TMP does the same. How many Trek fans know the lady that died in the transporter with Commander Sonak was Kirk's lover at the time?

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Vonda McIntyre's novelization of Star Trek 3 set up a romance between Saavik and David that really did not exist, and went on far longer than the movie.

Novelizations, particularly in the 1980s, worked off development scripts and generally weren't allowed to embellish much. That there are the seeds of a romance between them is just a continuation of the fact that those seeds existed in an early draft of TWOK, and, at one point, they were going to be a part of TSFS, so, if you think it's a bad idea, McIntyre is not the one to blame.

The worst ending of a current novel series was Destiny. Really? They invent an alien race to have them just make the Borg go away? That's sloppy. It was good until the ending.

The groundwork had been laid with the Caeliar for a while. They existed and were developed in novels as an addition to the Trek lore. They weren't just introduced out of nowhere. They were a necessary solution to a now ridiculous problem. The Borg had to be dealt with in a way that made sense for what they once were (an unstoppable, rampaging machine) In any large-scale battle, the Borg should have been able to obliterate Starfleet. But, after they became Voyager's ratings crutch, they were nothing in terms of a force.Indeed, I'd argue that the Dominion was more formidable than the post VOY Borg.

So they had to built up again. They were. But how do you beat something like that??? Straight-up fight? No chance. Tell them to go to sleep again? Yeah, no. Pull a "Hugh," by giving them one of those mazes you find on a kid's table at a restaurant and hope they get so confused, they die? Try another "Descent?" At best you create another civil war and only delay your problems.

The best solution was just to introduce a bigger shark.

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I totally agree. Ashes of Eden wasn't too bad yet, despite the "romantic fantasies of an old man", but it definitely got worse from there, and totally unbelievable. Sadly, it also left me with an impression that, despite their talent (Federation remains a great novel, even if canon has marched on), the Reeves-Stevens write mostly fan-fiction with a fair amount of fan-wank. Federation and their ENT Season 4 stint demonstrates examples of this, but it's never as bad as their Shatner collaboration (the extent of which has, of course, been wildly speculated upon).

Agreed, Ashes of Eden was still okay. But all that followed... not my cup of tea.

As for fan-wank, heck, who am I to complain? We *are* fans, after all! But then, I remember you are "not a real fan", so I shouldn't speak for you. :P

No seriously, I think "fan-wank" only deserves this label when self-references are the only thing a work has to offer, but falls flat in all other regards. I could be wrong, but I can't say that about ENT season 4. Sure, it had a huge load of reference gimmicks for hardcore fans, but the stories were not any worse on their own, than the previous seasons. And I doubt that viewers unaware of the references would have found these episodes any less entertaining than the seasons before, as the stories made enough sense on their own.

At any rate, I think novels are the perfect medium for fan-references. I doubt many casual viewers even buy these novels, which leaves more or less avid fans. Where if not here? ;)

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Ashes of Eden was decent, but the rest of the Shatnerverse novels were just horrible IMO.   Yes, even his much-lauded "The Return." 

They were essentially Mary Sue tomes of William Shatner, as ghost-written by Judy & Gar Reeves-Stevens.   I agree with Tupperfan (way upthread) that it was nice to see Montreal have a cameo, as well as the USS St. Lawrence (one of the great rivers of North America), but again; that was part of the problem.  Shatner wasn't writing James T. Kirk (a native of Riverside, Iowa) so much as he was writing William Shatner, native of Montreal, Quebec.   Again; the Shatnerverse was a Mary Sue-crime scene of the worst magnitude.   

There was one novel in particular (can't remember which; they all blur together after "The Return") which involved Mirror-Kirk ("Tiberius") and was basically the heroes running, escaping, getting captured, escaping, running, getting captured again, etc. ad infinitum.   To me, nothing is duller to read in print than pages-and-pages of running and escaping.   So help me, it was headache inducing.  

And when I started "The Captain's Blood" and read about Picard & Kirk scuba-diving together I gave up.   He even killed off Spock in that s#!tty book for no good reason other than to allow for a weak revenge story right out of f--king "T.J. Hooker."  

Again, I don't mind killing off icons; but it should be WORTH it.  Especially a character as renowned, beloved and revered as Spock (arguably more popular than Kirk; he's certainly been around the ST universe a lot longer).

I'm pretty much through with the Shatnerverse.  I've read far, far better fanfic (many times, in fact).  And certainly more disciplined stuff as well.   

 

 

 

 

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My nominee - TNG novel Planet X.  crossover between X-Men and TNG?  Really? That novel still makes me shutter. 

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Ashes of Eden was decent, but the rest of the Shatnerverse novels were just horrible IMO.   Yes, even his much-lauded "The Return." 

They were essentially Mary Sue tomes of William Shatner, as ghost-written by Judy & Gar Reeves-Stevens.   I agree with Tupperfan (way upthread) that it was nice to see Montreal have a cameo, as well as the USS St. Lawrence (one of the great rivers of North America), but again; that was part of the problem.  Shatner wasn't writing James T. Kirk (a native of Riverside, Iowa) so much as he was writing William Shatner, native of Montreal, Quebec.   Again; the Shatnerverse was a Mary Sue-crime scene of the worst magnitude.   

There was one novel in particular (can't remember which; they all blur together after "The Return") which involved Mirror-Kirk ("Tiberius") and was basically the heroes running, escaping, getting captured, escaping, running, getting captured again, etc. ad infinitum.   To me, nothing is duller to read in print than pages-and-pages of running and escaping.   So help me, it was headache inducing.  

And when I started "The Captain's Blood" and read about Picard & Kirk scuba-diving together I gave up.   He even killed off Spock in that s#!tty book for no good reason other than to allow for a weak revenge story right out of f--king "T.J. Hooker."  

Again, I don't mind killing off icons; but it should be WORTH it.  Especially a character as renowned, beloved and revered as Spock (arguably more popular than Kirk; he's certainly been around the ST universe a lot longer).

I'm pretty much through with the Shatnerverse.  I've read far, far better fanfic (many times, in fact).  And certainly more disciplined stuff as well.   

 

 

 

 

How do you really feel? :)

To be honest, the Duchess and I were writing better stuff together pushing 20 years ago.

The Shatnerverse is just bad.

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Sadly, it also left me with an impression that, despite their talent (Federation remains a great novel, even if canon has marched on), the Reeves-Stevens write mostly fan-fiction with a fair amount of fan-wank

This.

I've always found them adequate, but rarely "good." 

IMO, "Prime Directive" is a really good TOS novel, certainly among my top 10.

Haven't read "Federation" yet.

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Ashes of Eden was decent, but the rest of the Shatnerverse novels were just horrible IMO.   Yes, even his much-lauded "The Return." 

They were essentially Mary Sue tomes of William Shatner, as ghost-written by Judy & Gar Reeves-Stevens.   I agree with Tupperfan (way upthread) that it was nice to see Montreal have a cameo, as well as the USS St. Lawrence (one of the great rivers of North America), but again; that was part of the problem.  Shatner wasn't writing James T. Kirk (a native of Riverside, Iowa) so much as he was writing William Shatner, native of Montreal, Quebec.   Again; the Shatnerverse was a Mary Sue-crime scene of the worst magnitude.   

There was one novel in particular (can't remember which; they all blur together after "The Return") which involved Mirror-Kirk ("Tiberius") and was basically the heroes running, escaping, getting captured, escaping, running, getting captured again, etc. ad infinitum.   To me, nothing is duller to read in print than pages-and-pages of running and escaping.   So help me, it was headache inducing.  

And when I started "The Captain's Blood" and read about Picard & Kirk scuba-diving together I gave up.   He even killed off Spock in that s#!tty book for no good reason other than to allow for a weak revenge story right out of f--king "T.J. Hooker."  

Again, I don't mind killing off icons; but it should be WORTH it.  Especially a character as renowned, beloved and revered as Spock (arguably more popular than Kirk; he's certainly been around the ST universe a lot longer).

I'm pretty much through with the Shatnerverse.  I've read far, far better fanfic (many times, in fact).  And certainly more disciplined stuff as well.   

 

 

 

 

How do you really feel? :)

tumblr_inline_mt4p2vORCM1rnagbo.gif ;)

 

There are other ST novels that were kind of substandard; more mediocre than all-out 'bad.'   About a year ago, I read a TOS-era novel called "The Joy Machine" which was essentially a remake of "Return of the Archons."  Nothing special.

There was also a rather lackluster Scotty story (post-"Relics" 24th century) called "Crossover" (which also featured Spock on Romulus).  Despite having those two wonderful characters in the same book, the novel was sadly... average.   A wasted opportunity.

 

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The worst are in my opinion BLACK FIRE (TOS) and RESISTANCE (TNG)

61surQjCzEL.jpg

And yeah, I love ASHES OF EDEN and the 10 Shatnerverse books with a huge passion, including THE RETURN. Go figure.

Gus

 

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I thought Black Fire was good actually. 

I read Black Fire when I was in high school, and only vaguely remember it, but yeah; I thought it was pretty good too.  Maybe if I reread it, I might feel differently (?).  

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I thought Black Fire was good actually. 

I read Black Fire when I was in high school, and only vaguely remember it, but yeah; I thought it was pretty good too.  Maybe if I reread it, I might feel differently (?).  

I read it ca. 8 years ago and remember it being very fan-fiction-ish. "What happens if Spock has to live like a caveman for a few months?"

Many early TOS novels had this fan-fiction vibe, IIRC ... this one was "meh", IMO.

It's probably not in my "top 10 of the worst", but may well be in the "top 11-20".

The worst are in my opinion BLACK FIRE (TOS) and RESISTANCE (TNG)

Yes, IMO "Resistance" is the weakest in the post-NEM TNG relaunch.

But's it's not in my "top 10 of the worst"... it's written well enough, technically. Just totally uninspired and generic, IMO.

Edited by Sim

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For me, so far, it's Michael Jan Friedman's Saratoga.  It's not an especially badly-written book, but it's exactly the same as his Reunion. The plots are identical; all he does is switch  Picard and the Stargazer with Sisko and the Saratoga.  I'm loathe to say that, because Friedman was the first Trek author whose books I deliberately looked for, being a fan of his Stargazer series and the misfire that was Starfleet: Year One.

Edited by Smellincoffee

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For me, so far, it's Michael Jan Friedman's Saratoga.  It's not an especially badly-written book, but it's exactly the same as his Reunion. The plots are identical; all he does is switch  Picard and the Stargazer with Sisko and the Saratoga.  I'm loathe to say that, because Friedman was the first Trek author whose books I deliberately looked for, being a fan of his Stargazer series and the misfire that was Starfleet: Year One.

Yes, Michael Jan Friedman must be the one author who is both capable of really outstanding novels ("Shadows on the Sun" must be one of my favorite novels ever! -- and was my favorite McCoy novel for quite a while, before David George III wrote his epic "Crucible: McCoy", which IMO is at least one entire league better than all other Trek novels I ever read), and mediocre or even sub-standard stuff.

Agreed that "Saratoga" is a blatant rip-off of "Reunion". But still, it's not among my least favorites. Despite the *blatant* lack of originality, it's still written in an entertaining manner and the characters are not off at all. Usually, that's really all I ask from a Trek novel.

Most of Friedman's stuff is good, but not outstanding IMO -- "Reunion" and the other Stargazer stuff, his TOS novels about Kirk's replicant from "WHat Are Little Girls Made of?" or the pre-story to Kirk and his relation to David Marcus, or his TNG novel about that gem chase Riker gets involved in. Usually, he has a knack for the characters, IMO. They're just like I know them.

Another one that's sub-standard IMO is "Crossover". That was all the more disappointing, as a novel featuring all surviving TOS characters in the 24th century (Spock, Bones and Scotty) should have been a blast.

(Btw: How do you pronounce his second name Jan? Is it "ee-an" or actually "Jan" with a "j" as in "ninja"? Or "yan"?)

Edited by Sim

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For me, so far, it's Michael Jan Friedman's Saratoga.  It's not an especially badly-written book, but it's exactly the same as his Reunion. The plots are identical; all he does is switch  Picard and the Stargazer with Sisko and the Saratoga.  I'm loathe to say that, because Friedman was the first Trek author whose books I deliberately looked for, being a fan of his Stargazer series and the misfire that was Starfleet: Year One.

Yes, Michael Jan Friedman must be the one author who is both capable of really outstanding novels ("Shadows on the Sun" must be one of my favorite novels ever! -- and was my favorite McCoy novel for quite a while, before David George III wrote his epic "Crucible: McCoy", which IMO is at least one entire league better than all other Trek novels I ever read), and mediocre or even sub-standard stuff.

Agreed that "Saratoga" is a blatant rip-off of "Reunion". But still, it's not among my least favorites. Despite the *blatant* lack of originality, it's still written in an entertaining manner and the characters are not off at all. Usually, that's really all I ask from a Trek novel.

Most of Friedman's stuff is good, but not outstanding IMO -- "Reunion" and the other Stargazer stuff, his TOS novels about Kirk's replicant from "WHat Are Little Girls Made of?" or the pre-story to Kirk and his relation to David Marcus, or his TNG novel about that gem chase Riker gets involved in. Usually, he has a knack for the characters, IMO. They're just like I know them.

Another one that's sub-standard IMO is "Crossover". That was all the more disappointing, as a novel featuring all surviving TOS characters in the 24th century (Spock, Bones and Scotty) should have been a blast.

(Btw: How do you pronounce his second name Jan? Is it "ee-an" or actually "Jan" with a "j" as in "ninja"? Or "yan"?)

 

Wasn't Crossover the one where Scotty steals the Yorktown to take it into Romulan space to rescue Spock?  I remember reading that one as a teenager and thinking, "...this is a bit of a stretch". 

Personally, I pronounce it with the firm J, like jam, but for the longest time I referred to the "Care-i-be-an" sea, so my track recording at guessing is not good. I've never seen a TV interview with him that might shed some light on the subject.

Edited by Smellincoffee

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Wasn't Crossover the one where Scotty steals the Yorktown to take it into Romulan space to rescue Spock?  I remember reading that one as a teenager and thinking, "...this is a bit of a stretch". 

Oh, it's been quite a while since I read it, but yes, I think that's it. If the Yorktown was the museum ship, then yes.

I just remember how much I was looking forward to a story of Spock, Bones and Scotty in the 24th century, and how disappointing the novel then turned out to be.

Personally, I pronounce it with the firm J, like jam, but for the longest time I referred to the "Care-i-be-an" sea, so my track recording at guessing is not good. I've never seen a TV interview with him that might shed some light on the subject.

Hm ok ... in Germany, "Jan" is a common name, but you pronounce it like "Yan". I guessed something about that doesn't sound right when it's an American name...

 

Oh, and another novel that's IMO pretty bad is TOS "Corona" by Greg Bear. It's very convoluted, a young racist(!) journalist in the focus, some "Ultimate Computer" thrown in for good measure, then Chekov taken over by a creepy alien consciousness, and all of these different storylines which don't match wrapped in an unbelievably pseudo-intellectual technobabble that's even supposed to be taken seriously, without any irony.

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Wasn't Crossover the one where Scotty steals the Yorktown to take it into Romulan space to rescue Spock?  I remember reading that one as a teenager and thinking, "...this is a bit of a stretch". 

Oh, it's been quite a while since I read it, but yes, I think that's it. If the Yorktown was the museum ship, then yes.

I just remember how much I was looking forward to a story of Spock, Bones and Scotty in the 24th century, and how disappointing the novel then turned out to be.

Personally, I pronounce it with the firm J, like jam, but for the longest time I referred to the "Care-i-be-an" sea, so my track recording at guessing is not good. I've never seen a TV interview with him that might shed some light on the subject.

Hm ok ... in Germany, "Jan" is a common name, but you pronounce it like "Yan". I guessed something about that doesn't sound right when it's an American name..

 

It may depend on where in the United States he is from. Some areas are so densely settled with  German and other northern countries that the pronunciation is closer to the European original.  I'm from the deep South, though, where 'Celts' are more predominant. My local area is littered with towns named Berlin and Hamburg, though!  

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Wasn't Crossover the one where Scotty steals the Yorktown to take it into Romulan space to rescue Spock?  I remember reading that one as a teenager and thinking, "...this is a bit of a stretch". 

Oh, it's been quite a while since I read it, but yes, I think that's it. If the Yorktown was the museum ship, then yes.

I just remember how much I was looking forward to a story of Spock, Bones and Scotty in the 24th century, and how disappointing the novel then turned out to be.

As I recall, you were the one who warned me about that one Sim; and you were exactly right, too.   Such a wasted opportunity that one was... 

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