GustavoLeao

FOR THE LOVE OF SPOCK : THE MOVIE

76 posts in this topic

^
This was my concern as well.   I read that book too, and it left me with... well, as Leonard might say (sing?), "bitter dregs."
 

Now, I understand that Adam Nimoy had an entirely different perspective than we idolizing fans (of course!) but I just hope he keeps it respectful; for our sakes.  

I actually asked Adam about it while he was working the kickstarter.  I said that I'd read his autobiography, and while I sympathized with the challenges involved in being the son of a celebrity, there were an awful lot of us who frankly ADORED Spock, and it wasn't clear to me that he was the right person to make this documentary.

His answer was very reassuring.  He thanked me for being one of 12 people to buy his autobiography :) and said that he and his father had improved their relationship greatly in the years after he wrote My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life.  He said he was in a much better place now than he'd been when he wrote that book, and he was making the movie to honor both his father and his father's most famous character.  So while I was still slightly uneasy, it felt as if the bitterness was gone ... until I read that Adam had put a lot of himself and his relationship with his father into the film.  His answer to me basically denied that he'd be doing that, so now I'm wondering what to think...

 

Still; I want to see the movie only because Leonard Nimoy was a personal inspiration growing up; Spock was my idol.   He was the geek-hero long before it was cool to be smart (back when being 'cool' essentially meant acting like a d!ck).  

 Same here!  In addition to the whole smart-kid thing, I also grew up with a mother whose emotions were so all-consuming that there was really no room for anyone else in the family to have emotions that differed from hers.  But I am not her, and my emotions often differed from hers.  I was told that this was WRONG, but I wasn't really able to have only her feelings.  And then Spock came along and talked to me about wrestling with emotions and told me that they were a problem even for HIM.  And if emotions were a problem for someone as wonderful as SPOCK, then maybe I wasn't crazy by finding them a problem, myself.  Of course, eventually I figured out what was going on and figured out where the source of the problem was ... but for a few years in my early teens, I emulated his emotionlessness as a way to survive my childhood.  Spock kept me from going (more) crazy or from killing myself; it's not hyperbole to say that he saved my life.

 

And meeting Nimoy in 2009 was one of my greatest Comic Con moments EVER.   One of the handful of times I've ever been genuinely starstruck.  He was also a very kindly-seeming man, and took my hand in a nice handshake.

It sounds like a wonderful experience!  I don't blame you for being starstruck.  

And yes, while we adore and admire Spock, the actor who played him also seems like an admirable fellow.  The stories about his insisting that Takei and Nichols be hired for TAS, about his getting pay parity for Nichols on TOS when it was brought to his attention that she was earning less than Takei and Koenig, his fighting for keeping Spock in character, even during the worst episodes of the third season ... Nimoy was a mensch.  His poetry is more earnest than skillful, but even his poetry shows him to be a sweet and thoughtful person.  Ultimately, a lot of Spock's finer qualities were present because Leonard Nimoy put them there, because they were in him.

I saw Leonard Nimoy in Boston during his performance at the Boston Pops, during one of his last-ever public appearances.  I deliberately did NOT hang around the stage door to meet him afterwards, because I thought that the nicest thing I could do for the guy was to leave him alone.  He'd been importuned by Star Trek fans everywhere he went for nearly 50 years, and I thought that hanging around the stage door to meet him -- even though it's common -- would be unethical.  Of course, after he died, I found that the moral high ground was not as comforting as a memory of meeting him might have been.  :(  But I chose it deliberately, and I live with that choice.  (NOT meaning to say that your meeting him at Comic Con was immoral.  When the stars are signed up to meet fans, that's different!)

 

I had a very difficult relationship with my mother (I know, I know... paging Dr. Freud!), but if she were idolized by millions of people?  I would be hesitant to want to deliberately shatter that image just to sate my own personal vendettas and take away something that was valuable to so many.    

As I get older, a part of me just says, "let it all go."   I hope the younger Nimoy has reached that point in his life.

I'm sorry to hear that your mother didn't treat you well.  All children deserve to be loved and protected and nurtured, and it's especially unjust that so lovely a person as yourself wasn't treated well.  I'm glad that time and maturity are giving you a kind of peace about it, though.  *hug*

Me, I eventually dealt with my childhood by becoming a person who gives other people space and permission (and skill training, if necessary) to claim their own feelings, whatever they are.  Funny how things work out. :P

 

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I saw Leonard Nimoy in Boston during his performance at the Boston Pops, during one of his last-ever public appearances.  I deliberately did NOT hang around the stage door to meet him afterwards, because I thought that the nicest thing I could do for the guy was to leave him alone.  He'd been importuned by Star Trek fans everywhere he went for nearly 50 years, and I thought that hanging around the stage door to meet him -- even though it's common -- would be unethical.  Of course, after he died, I found that the moral high ground was not as comforting as a memory of meeting him might have been.  :(  But I chose it deliberately, and I live with that choice.  (NOT meaning to say that your meeting him at Comic Con was immoral.  When the stars are signed up to meet fans, that's different!)

Oh yeah, I agree (about it being uncool to approach a celebrity unguarded).  But his appearance at Comic Con was an autograph session and I was about the 3rd or 4th in line (got there just as the line was forming!), so it was ethical.  But if he were having lunch with his wife or something?  I would've left him alone.   I've seen a few celebrities at 'private time' and I just let them be.

I'm sorry to hear that your mother didn't treat you well.  All children deserve to be loved and protected and nurtured, and it's especially unjust that so lovely a person as yourself wasn't treated well.  I'm glad that time and maturity are giving you a kind of peace about it, though.  *hug* 

You're a sweetheart for saying that!  *hugs back!* 

 Me, I eventually dealt with my childhood by becoming a person who gives other people space and permission (and skill training, if necessary) to claim their own feelings, whatever they are.  Funny how things work out. :P

 

I admire how you turned a personal life issue into something helpful for others.   Tres cool! ;)

In addition to the whole smart-kid thing, I also grew up with a mother whose emotions were so all-consuming that there was really no room for anyone else in the family to have emotions that differed from hers.  But I am not her, and my emotions often differed from hers.  I was told that this was WRONG, but I wasn't really able to have only her feelings.  And then Spock came along and talked to me about wrestling with emotions and told me that they were a problem even for HIM.  And if emotions were a problem for someone as wonderful as SPOCK, then maybe I wasn't crazy by finding them a problem, myself.  Of course, eventually I figured out what was going on and figured out where the source of the problem was ... but for a few years in my early teens, I emulated his emotionlessness as a way to survive my childhood.  Spock kept me from going (more) crazy or from killing myself; it's not hyperbole to say that he saved my life.

Others might poo-poo or dismiss a fictional character giving 'real life' help to others but I say it with conviction.   Spock HELPED me through adolescence; his conflict between his logic and his emotions felt exactly like what I dealt with as a teenager.   When Amanda tearfully reminds Spock of his bullied past in "Journey to Babel" I almost felt like she was breaking the 4th wall and speaking to both of us; I was the 'outsider' as a kid.  I had a small circle of friends, but we were all 'misfit toys', so to speak.    Spock taught me that being the outsider could also be advantageous and even... cool.  

At that age in my life, it was more effective than a million self-help tapes.  

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I can tell you guys that FOR THE LOVE OF SPOCK is Adam Nimoy's love letter to his father, and he pays a great eulogy to his father and the character of Mr Spock. Its that good. If you read Shatner's book LEONARD you know that Adam and his dad made peace with one another a few years ago.

Gus

PS - Dont forget to stay in the final credits, guys, so you can see my name on the big screen LOL

How that happened anyway ?

Edited by GustavoLeao

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I can tell you guys that FOR THE LOVE OF SPOCK is Adam Nimoy's love letter to his father, and he pays a great eulogy to his father and the character of Mr Spock. Its that good.

I'm relieved to hear that!  Thanks for that reassurance. :thumbup:

 

If you read Shatner's book LEONARD you know that Adam and his dad made peace with one another a few years ago.

I did read Shatner's book, but I take Shatner with a grain of salt.  Actually, I take Shatner with a whole shakerful of salt. :-)  Shatner tried to blame Leonard for the failure of Star Trek V: The Final Frontier --  and says a number of other things that I find inaccurate or otherwise problematic -- so I don't always assume that Shatner knows what he's talking about.

 

PS - Dont foget to stay in the final credits, guys, so you can see my name on the big screen LOL

Wouldn't miss it! :thumbup:

 

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Well, with Bill Shatner you can always says he dont know enough what he's talking, that he uses ghost writer and that he is some time clueless and so forth. I enjoyed the book LEONARD. I was sorry that Nimoy stop talking to Shatner a few months before his death - I always thought they were like brothers. Oh well, poor Bill, I cant helped to feel bad for him

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Anyway, FOR THE LOVE OF SPOCK will surprise people  as the most emotional homage made to thememory of Leonard Nimoy even produced aaand my big THANK YOU goes to Adam Nimoy and the good people at 455 Films..

Gus

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Monday evening, my husband and I saw For the Love of Spock.  Here's a report of what we saw and what I thought of it.

Adam Nimoy had advertised the movie in his Kickstarter campaign as a documentary celebrating Spock and Leonard Nimoy, in honor of the 50th anniversary of Star Trek.  That was two-thirds of the film.  The final third was a look at the troubled relationship between Adam and Leonard.

The first third of the film -- the part about Spock -- was sorta fun, though I didn't feel as if Adam shed any actual light on the subject.  There was a collection of great Spock moments -- not as good as what you could find in any fan-made YouTube compilation -- a few interviews with Trekkies who felt that Spock helped them in various personal ways, and a few interviews with professional scientists who appreciated Spock.  Neil DeGrasse Tyson was especially notable among the latter, for being consistently adorable, but then, he usually is. :-)

The second third of the film -- the part about Leonard Nimoy -- was, I thought, the best part.  We got clips of Leonard's guest appearances in various TV shows while he was a young man, shots of him in various plays after he became famous, and some discussion of the movies he'd directed and the photographs he'd taken.  There were interviews with his older brother, Melvin, and his wife, with a childhood friend who also became an actor, and with the surviving cast members of TOS and of the reboot movies.  I had never seen Melvin before, and it was interesting to hear him talk about his little brother.

The final third of the film -- the part where Adam talked about his troubled relationship with his father -- blames Leonard's devotion to his work and the consequent long hours, exhaustion, and general non-availability for Adam's various addictions and general dissatisfaction with life.  There's a quite a lot of that -- He forced the whole family to help him answer his fan mail!  The pain!  The horror! -- and then it winds up with a segment whose tone is "Fortunately, Leonard eventually gave up all that acting nonsense and devoted himself to his family, as he should have all along."

So the film has a "happy" ending, by having Leonard give up his various creative pursuits to devote himself to his family.

Bleah.

Adam says that his ex-wife -- with whom he is good friends -- told him that there was too much of HIM in the movie.  He asked the movie's editor -- he told us during the introduction before the film that this was a woman he hired specifically because she knew nothing about Star Trek -- and she told him that putting so much of himself into the movie was a good thing.  Judged just as a movie, the editor is probably right, because the last third adds a bit of drama.  Judged as a film touted as a celebration of Spock and Leonard Nimoy, however, I'm afraid I have to agree with the ex-wife.  And even more than Adam's injecting so much of himself into the movie, I object to his making "Give up your career and devote yourself to your family" the point or moral of the story he's telling.

So now I'll talk about the movie in more detail, by part:

1.  The first third of the movie is probably the best that Adam could have done, given that he wasn't a big Spock fan.  I think someone other than Adam could have done a much better job with this, though I guess it's not Adam's fault that he isn't someone else. :-)  The thing is that Adam is one of the few people who have access to all of the cast members and to Neil DeGrasse Tyson and to folks at NASA and so on.  A Spock-loving Trekkie could have written and planned a better movie about Spock, but that person wouldn't have had the access that Adam had, and that's rather unfortunate.  I would have loved to have seen a movie like this made by someone who had Adam's access but who truly LOVED Spock.

The organization of the first part is along the lines of the Vulcan superpowers, so there's a bit of "He mind-melds!  He neck-pinches!  He gives the Vulcan salute!  How cool!"  And yeah, okay, those things are cool, and there is a nod to how Spock has inspired several scientists and been a role-model and comfort to outsiders of various stripes.  It was quite reasonable, that first third.  But I didn't feel as if it was made with real LOVE for Spock, and I didn't feel as if it shed any light on why Spock is so compelling that any reasonably articulate Trekkie couldn't have given us with five minutes' thought.

There wasn't any deeper analysis of Spock's character beyond the scientist and outsider stuff, so we didn't hear about all the things besides the Vulcan superpowers that make Spock such a compelling character.  Personally, I find the fact that Spock will do what he believes to be the right thing, no matter how much it costs him personally, to be one of the hallmarks of his character and one of the reasons why he's so inspiring, but maybe that's just me?  Like how he was willing to face the death penalty to take Christopher Pike to Talos IV in "The Menagerie," or how he was willing to let his father die and his mother hate him to protect the ambassadors on board the Enterprise in "Journey to Babel," and of course there's his repairing the ship at the cost of his own life in The Wrath of Khan.

2. I have less to say about the second part of the movie.  It gave us a summary -- or maybe more accurately, a collage -- of Leonard's background and life.  That was fine, though I did think it was perhaps telling that Adam left out several of the stories that show Leonard's goodness.  He gave us the story about Leonard's insisting that Takei and Nichols be hired for the animated series but not the ones about his getting pay parity for Nichols during TOS or about his being the only one Grace Lee Whitney felt she could trust and confide in after someone connected with the show raped her.

3.  Adam talks about his troubled relationship with his father and makes it clear that he didn't get what he wanted from his father until the last few years of Leonard's life.  He never tells us, though -- I learned this from Shatner's book about Leonard -- that when Adam wanted to stop being a lawyer and start being a director, Leonard arranged for Adam to shadow a director on The Next Generation and essentially be tutored in the craft by a working professional, something that a person whose last name was NOT Nimoy could probably not have arranged at all, and if they had been able to arrange it, they'd have had to show some talent and training first.

Adam doesn't seem to take the cultural standards of the time into account.  Leonard Nimoy was born one year before my own father was born; Adam is two years older than I am.  I remember the times during which he and I were raised, and the cultural standard then was that the woman raised the children and the man worked hard and supported the family.  It was considered normal, natural, and desirable for the wife to devote herself to the children and for the husband to devote himself to his career so that he could provide financial support for his family.  Nowadays, we find those attitudes sexist and limiting, and I'm glad that our cultural standards have changed.  But I think it's unfair to judge a man for not living up to standards that didn't exist at the time!

A reading of Leonard's autobiographies shows that he spent an enormous amount of time and energy on his career because he needed and wanted that creative outlet.  But it also shows that during the years of the TV show, he made a huge number of personal appearances all over the country for anyone who would pay him -- at a time when he was exhausted from working 12-16 hours a day on the show -- in order to provide for his family while he could.  He thought that his popularity and marketability would decline after the TV show went off the air -- a reasonable conclusion, given what happens to most TV actors -- and he was determined to take advantage of every available opportunity while he still had them.  There was no creative outlet for Leonard in all those public appearances; he did them to support his family.

By the standards of the time, Leonard was doing the right thing and more than the right thing, was going above and beyond and working himself into exhaustion to provide for his family.

Leonard never got what he wanted and needed from his own father, or from his mother, either.  They were very invested in the success of his older brother and had less attention for him, plus they never understood either his ambition to be an actor or the show that made him a star.  Leonard's parents disappointed him at least as much as Leonard disappointed Adam ... and Leonard went on to become a great man.  Not just a great actor, though he was that, but a man whose intimates (except for Adam) all talk about his goodness, kindness, and generosity.

Although the movie certainly wasn't all bad and in fact had some lovely moments, overall I thought that Adam Nimoy made a rather self-indulgent film.  Of course, the poor guy did lose his father recently, so one can forgive a certain amount of self focus ... but this isn't the movie I thought I was funding, and I was heartsick at the "moral" Adam gave us.

Do you want to see the film?  Yeah, you probably do.  But you'll probably enjoy it more if you go in with lowered expectations.

 

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^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^  Thanks for the effort you put into this detailed review.  It shows that it means a lot to you personally.  Nicely done.

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How did you watch the movie, Corylea ? I want to watch my name as "research" on the final credits so badly  - just kidding, guys, just kidding. LOL

But I cant wait to watch the docu, you just posted a great review thought. Thank you !

Gus

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Corylea, thank you SO much.   That was a great review and analysis!   I still look forward to the movie, but I'm adjusting my expectations accordingly.   

Thanks again! :thumbup:

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How did you watch the movie, Corylea ?

By "how," do you mean how did I get to watch it before September 9th?  If one backed Adam's Kickstarter at the appropriate level, the perk was a backer-only screening.  These were held in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Boston. 

Boston isn't anywhere near as big a city as the first three, but since it's Leonard's hometown, he had lots of ties here, and Boston remained special to him even 60 years after he'd left it.  So I was very lucky, to have a screening happening just a 30-minute subway ride away!

There weren't as many Boston backers at the appropriate level as there were seats, so Adam's daughter -- who apparently lives here -- brought some of her friends and co-workers and various other folks.  (We sat near them, so we heard her introduce person after person to her father.  Evidently she's an extrovert. ;) )

 

I want to watch my name as "research" on the final credits so badly  - just kidding, guys, just kidding. LOL

I don't blame you!  Seriously, if I'd been consulted as a researcher on a movie about Spock, I'd have trouble refraining from taking out billboards to advertise it. :laugh:  You've been very restrained under the circumstances. :thumbup:

 

But I cant wait to watch the docu, you just posted a great review thought. Thank you !

Thank you!  Since my review wasn't uniformly positive, I was worried about what you would think of it.  I'm glad you don't feel hurt by it.  It's clear to me that any, uh, let's call them "infelicities," in the movie were NOT your fault. :)

 

Corylea, thank you SO much.   That was a great review and analysis!   I still look forward to the movie, but I'm adjusting my expectations accordingly.   

Thanks again! :thumbup:

You're welcome, and thanks for your reply; I'm glad you found that rather lengthy review interesting or useful. :)

Yeah, you definitely want to see the movie, but I figure you'll enjoy it more if your reaction is "That's better than Corylea said it was" than if your reaction is, "But wait, I was hoping to bask in some vicarious Spock adoration, and it's not here!" :)

 

There's an anecdote that J. J. Abrams told in the movie that I thought was interesting, especially since he said he'd never divulged this before.  It turns out that Leonard Nimoy broke his nose while filming the first reboot movie.  Abrams wanted to stop filming and send Leonard to the hospital, but Leonard said, "Nonsense, let's continue shooting."  So they kept shooting.  Seventy-eight years old and an icon, but Leonard didn't want to hold up the shooting schedule!  Those people who were kids during the Depression ... they had grit. ;)

Abrams said that not only was he concerned about Leonard when he broke his nose, but he was also just generally aghast, saying, "I broke Spock's nose!  I broke Spock's nose!  Oh, no!  They're gonna kill me!"  :giggle:

Those folks who make movies?  They're all just people. ;)

 

Edited by Corylea

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Thank you for the great info and anecdotes, Corylea ! Cant wait to see this movie. You know, I worked hard on it researching Nimoy's life and career pre-Star Trek and during his Star Trek years, and it was a pleasure to work for Adam Nimoy, such a nice guy, and producers Kevin and Helene Layne from 455 Films. We all become fast friends and it was a blast. Unfortunately, I will only see this movie when the DVD is released because I am here in Brazil, I just cant wait to watch this one. Special place in my heart......

Gus

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Thank you for the great info and anecdotes, Corylea ! Cant wait to see this movie. You know, I worked hard on it researching Nimoy's life and career pre-Star Trek and during his Star Trek years, and it was a pleasure to work for Adam Nimoy, such a nice guy, and producers Kevin and Helene Layne from 455 Films. We all become fast friends and it was a blast. Unfortunately, I will only see this movie when the DVD is released because I am here in Brazil, I just cant wait to watch this one. Special place in my heart......

Gus

Adam told us a number of things in an introduction before the movie, one of which was "I had a guy to advise me who knows more about Star Trek than anyone should know."  I guess that was you. :thumbup:  And now you know how much he wants to know about Star Trek -- a lot less than YOU do. :laugh:

I'm sorry to hear that you can't see it until it comes out on DVD.  Adam said they were going to try to get it on streaming services, so maybe you'll be able to watch it there?

There was a wonderful Zachary Quinto moment in the film. One of the last things Adam did was ask a bunch of people what one word they'd use to describe Leonard. There were a lot of great words for him, and when they got to Zachary Quinto, he turned red, teared up, and looked like he was about to burst into sobs at any moment, then choked out, "Love."

He's  the one I wish had made this movie.  Adam looks a lot like Leonard, but Zachary feels a lot more like Leonard.

 

 

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Thank you for the great info and anecdotes, Corylea ! Cant wait to see this movie. You know, I worked hard on it researching Nimoy's life and career pre-Star Trek and during his Star Trek years, and it was a pleasure to work for Adam Nimoy, such a nice guy, and producers Kevin and Helene Layne from 455 Films. We all become fast friends and it was a blast. Unfortunately, I will only see this movie when the DVD is released because I am here in Brazil, I just cant wait to watch this one. Special place in my heart......

Gus

Adam told us a number of things in an introduction before the movie, one of which was "I had a guy to advise me who knows more about Star Trek than anyone should know."  I guess that was you. :thumbup:  And now you know how much he wants to know about Star Trek -- a lot less than YOU do. :laugh:

I'm sorry to hear that you can't see it until it comes out on DVD.  Adam said they were going to try to get it on streaming services, so maybe you'll be able to watch it there?

There was a wonderful Zachary Quinto moment in the film. One of the last things Adam did was ask a bunch of people what one word they'd use to describe Leonard. There were a lot of great words for him, and when they got to Zachary Quinto, he turned red, teared up, and looked like he was about to burst into sobs at any moment, then choked out, "Love."

He's  the one I wish had made this movie.  Adam looks a lot like Leonard, but Zachary feels a lot more like Leonard.

 

 

I must say, even as a lifelong Leonard Nimoy fan, I really do love what Zachary Quinto does with the character.   He's an amazingly gifted actor.   

I met Adam Nimoy briefly after a panel at last year's Comic Con, and he does bear quite a resemblance to his dad, but I agree that Quinto really captures Nimoy's 'essence' with the character.   Not specifically his voice or whatnot, but his overall level of "Spockness" just feels so right. 

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I must say, even as a lifelong Leonard Nimoy fan, I really do love what Zachary Quinto does with the character.   He's an amazingly gifted actor.   

I met Adam Nimoy briefly after a panel at last year's Comic Con, and he does bear quite a resemblance to his dad, but I agree that Quinto really captures Nimoy's 'essence' with the character.   Not specifically his voice or whatnot, but his overall level of "Spockness" just feels so right. 

I wasn't actually talking about Quinto's portrayal of Spock, though that's a reasonable interpretation to make of what I said. 

I've read a lot of interviews with Mr. Quinto and a lot of interviews with Mr. Nimoy, and they seem to have a similar approach to their lives and to their art.  They're both extremely intelligent men who THINK, they both care greatly about the ethical implications of their actions, and they're both more interested in creating characters who live and breathe than in being stars.  They even both had fathers who were barbers. :ohmy:  And -- of course I noticed this -- when they were asked "If for some reason you couldn't have a career in the arts, what would you have been instead," both of them answered, "a psychologist."

Yes, I think Quinto does a great Spock; all the problems I have with the reboot Spock are with the writing, not the actor.  And for all that I prefer Nimoy's cooler, more restrained Spock, I think Quinto's simmering-just-under-the-surface Spock IS a valid interpretation of a half-human, half-Vulcan character.  But it's the stuff they've done ASIDE from Spock that makes me feel that Mr. Quinto is Mr. Nimoy's spiritual son; everything I read about them suggests that these two men were very similar in many ways.  Of course, since they were born in different eras, and since Mr. Quinto is gay, they have some differences, too.  But the similarities are pronounced.  And since many of the Quinto interviews I read were from the Heroes era, before he was cast as Spock, he wasn't trying to sound like Mr. Nimoy.

I wouldn't be surprised if Mr. Quinto published a book of poetry someday -- as Leonard did -- but with luck, we'll never hear him sing "Bilbo Baggins." :giggle:

 

Edited by Corylea

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I must say, even as a lifelong Leonard Nimoy fan, I really do love what Zachary Quinto does with the character.   He's an amazingly gifted actor.   

I met Adam Nimoy briefly after a panel at last year's Comic Con, and he does bear quite a resemblance to his dad, but I agree that Quinto really captures Nimoy's 'essence' with the character.   Not specifically his voice or whatnot, but his overall level of "Spockness" just feels so right. 

I wasn't actually talking about Quinto's portrayal of Spock, though that's a reasonable interpretation to make of what I said. 

I've read a lot of interviews with Mr. Quinto and a lot of interviews with Mr. Nimoy, and they seem to have a similar approach to their lives and to their art.  They're both extremely intelligent men who THINK, they both care greatly about the ethical implications of their actions, and they're both more interested in creating characters who live and breathe than in being stars.  They even both had fathers who were barbers. :ohmy:  And -- of course I noticed this -- when they were asked "If for some reason you couldn't have a career in the arts, what would you have been instead," both of them answered, "a psychologist."

Yes, I think Quinto does a great Spock; all the problems I have with the reboot Spock are with the writing, not the actor.  And for all that I prefer Nimoy's cooler, more restrained Spock, I think Quinto's simmering-just-under-the-surface Spock IS a valid interpretation of a half-human, half-Vulcan character.  But it's the stuff they've done ASIDE from Spock that makes me feel that Mr. Quinto is Mr. Nimoy's spiritual son; everything I read about them suggests that these two men were very similar in many ways.  Of course, since they were born in different eras, and since Mr. Quinto is gay, they have some differences, too.  But the similarities are pronounced.  And since many of the Quinto interviews I read were from the Heroes era, before he was cast as Spock, he wasn't trying to sound like Mr. Nimoy.

I wouldn't be surprised if Mr. Quinto published a book of poetry someday -- as Leonard did -- but with luck, we'll never hear him sing "Bilbo Baggins." :giggle:

 

Hey, I like the Bilbo Baggins song... :laugh:

Just for that, Corylea: Leonard Nimoy's The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins  :P

0.jpg

"In the middle of the earth in the land of the Shire
Lives a brave little hobbit whom we all admire.
With his long wooden pipe,
Fuzzy, woolly toes,
He lives in a hobbit-hole and everybody knows him

Bilbo! Bilbo! Bilbo Baggins
He's only three feet tall
Bilbo! Bilbo! Bilbo Baggins
The bravest little hobbit of them all..."


 

 

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I wouldn't be surprised if Mr. Quinto published a book of poetry someday -- as Leonard did -- but with luck, we'll never hear him sing "Bilbo Baggins." :giggle:

 

Hey, I like the Bilbo Baggins song... :laugh:

I think it's a wonderful time capsule from the late 60's, giving us a picture of what the sensibility was like back then.  Yes, we really DID wear those kinds of clothes and dance those kinds of dances and, well, yeah. :P

But the world has changed a lot -- the sweet innocence of the 60's is no more -- so Mr. Quinto is unlikely to make anything like it.  I think a movie star today would be more likely to rap than to sing a folk song, and I think those genres are emblematic of the times that spawned them.

Oh, wait, I gave you a serious answer to a tease, didn't I?  But that's a form of teasing in itself, don't you think? :giggle:

 

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I wouldn't be surprised if Mr. Quinto published a book of poetry someday -- as Leonard did -- but with luck, we'll never hear him sing "Bilbo Baggins." :giggle:

 

Hey, I like the Bilbo Baggins song... :laugh:

I think it's a wonderful time capsule from the late 60's, giving us a picture of what the sensibility was like back then.  Yes, we really DID wear those kinds of clothes and dance those kinds of dances and, well, yeah. :P

But the world has changed a lot -- the sweet innocence of the 60's is no more -- so Mr. Quinto is unlikely to make anything like it.  I think a movie star today would be more likely to rap than to sing a folk song, and I think those genres are emblematic of the times that spawned them.

Oh, wait, I gave you a serious answer to a tease, didn't I?  But that's a form of teasing in itself, don't you think? :giggle:

 

giphy.gif :P

Just teasing! :laugh:

 

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Thanks Mike ! Good that I saved some of the TrekWeb articles here because Steve Krutzler decide to deleted the site. Ah the good old days...........

Haha thats the hand of my auntie Goretti, this photo was taken in my birthday this year. And no, she"s no Vulcan LOL

Gus

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Thanks Gus.

I will investigate buying the DVD "For The Love Of Spock" for the UK 

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Thanks, Mike. FOR THE LOVE OF SPOCK is really intense and emotional.

Hope you liked the new trailer.

Gus

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Can't wait to see this!

 

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And now 455 Films is proding a DS9 documentary.......guess who will be the reseacher consultant (again).....LOL

Exciting !

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