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Star Wars Rogue One Teaser Trailer is up!

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I see absolutely nothing wrong with this. You have real sets, all tying back to the production designs of the original Star Wars, and the potential for Darth Vader in a story not having to do with anything involving Jedi. Lucasfilm confirmed that ILM were constructing a Vader suit that was wholly identical to his original 1977 suit. This has all the makings to a rip-roaring look into the actual war that's supposedly part of this Galactic Civil War. Bring it the f*** on.

^
What he said.

I kind of like the idea of SW doing a solo one-off war story without any heavy magic or supernatural influences.   Gives a better look into the day-to-day realities of what life might be like in that universe for us 'muggles.' 

 

I like the trailer.

I'm not the hugest Star Wars fan there is, but I'm cheap. Just pander to nostalgia well enough and I'm sold.

I think it'll be a little bit more than pandering to nostalgia; from the look of it, it's got a real story (and arc) to tell; the unsung heroes of the Rebellion.  And that IS a story that I've not yet heard before.

When it's a fresh story, all the better! But I was sold by the hints of nostalgia already... :P

Well, it's a story that has had one version or another in the expanded universe, but that doesn't count so technically it's never been told onscreen before.   Either way, I love the fact that it's so lovingly recreating the sets/feel of the 1977 movie.    Yes, it's arguably a very expensive fan film but hey; so what?   I love fan films!  ST Continues (and even a couple of ST Phase II) are great stuff, so for me calling something a fan film isn't necessarily an insult; it's means it was made from a place of love. 

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I like the trailer.

I'm not the hugest Star Wars fan there is, but I'm cheap. Just pander to nostalgia well enough and I'm sold.

I think it'll be a little bit more than pandering to nostalgia; from the look of it, it's got a real story (and arc) to tell; the unsung heroes of the Rebellion.  And that IS a story that I've not yet heard before.

When it's a fresh story, all the better! But I was sold by the hints of nostalgia already... :P

Well, it's a story that has had one version or another in the expanded universe, but that doesn't count so technically it's never been told onscreen before.   Either way, I love the fact that it's so lovingly recreating the sets/feel of the 1977 movie.    Yes, it's arguably a very expensive fan film but hey; so what?   I love fan films!  ST Continues (and even a couple of ST Phase II) are great stuff, so for me calling something a fan film isn't necessarily an insult; it's means it was made from a place of love. 

Exactly my feelings too.

10 years ago, some people mocked ENT season 4 as "fan wanking" ... as if they weren't fans. So even if it appears as such for uninvolved observers -- I'm a fan, so why would I take offense by producers giving me just what I, as a fan, would like to see?

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I like the trailer.

I'm not the hugest Star Wars fan there is, but I'm cheap. Just pander to nostalgia well enough and I'm sold.

I think it'll be a little bit more than pandering to nostalgia; from the look of it, it's got a real story (and arc) to tell; the unsung heroes of the Rebellion.  And that IS a story that I've not yet heard before.

When it's a fresh story, all the better! But I was sold by the hints of nostalgia already... :P

Well, it's a story that has had one version or another in the expanded universe, but that doesn't count so technically it's never been told onscreen before.   Either way, I love the fact that it's so lovingly recreating the sets/feel of the 1977 movie.    Yes, it's arguably a very expensive fan film but hey; so what?   I love fan films!  ST Continues (and even a couple of ST Phase II) are great stuff, so for me calling something a fan film isn't necessarily an insult; it's means it was made from a place of love. 

Exactly my feelings too.

10 years ago, some people mocked ENT season 4 as "fan wanking" ... as if they weren't fans. So even if it appears as such for uninvolved observers -- I'm a fan, so why would I take offense by producers giving me just what I, as a fan, would like to see?

To me, a negative example of a 'fan film' would be something that slavishly recreates the settings but has no story, or poorly acted/written characters (ST Phase II's recent "The Holiest Thing" Is a perfect example of what I mean).   But generally, I love them because if they're done smartly and thoughtfully (as STC is), they can be truly surprising.  

I think "Rogue One" is wise not to call itself Episode 3.5 or something like that, because it would automatically have much more grandiose expectations, and would (should) by definition, advance the stories of the main characters somehow (or at least their families).  

But R1 is leaving the Skywalker family story for the Episodes to cover and focusing on the untold story of what looks like a 'dirty dozen' type mission of ordinary soldiers of the Rebellion; and not force-jumping Jedi and supernatural Sith.  

Jyn (played by the terrific Felicity Jones of "Theory Of Everything") isn't some lightsaber-wielding force sensitive; she's more like "La Femme Nikita" in space and I'm cool with that, because we haven't seen anyone quite like her in the SW movie universe.    

This is a smart opportunity for a 'smaller' SW film that can afford to be both lovingly referential and break new ground all at the same time....

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This trailer looks amazing. It looks like we're finally moving away from the kiddie nonsense of the PT and cartoons. It took long enough . . .

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I hate the term "fan wanking" or anything similar.  If you're a producer/writer/someone involved in making something, your job is to make your fans happy.  You are in the entertainment industry and nods to your target audience are a GOOD thing.  The key is doing it in a way that those that aren't experts will be able to follow, which is doable.

 

 

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This trailer looks amazing. It looks like we're finally moving away from the kiddie nonsense of the PT and cartoons. It took long enough . . .

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I hate the term "fan wanking" or anything similar.  If you're a producer/writer/someone involved in making something, your job is to make your fans happy.  You are in the entertainment industry and nods to your target audience are a GOOD thing.  The key is doing it in a way that those that aren't experts will be able to follow, which is doable.

Personally I prefer 'fan service' (wanking is a slur no matter how one uses it).

And if an entertainment is aimed at a mass audience but is nothing more than a prolonged, headache-inducing series of in-jokes and fanboy references, then it IS just fan service and very much deserves that disparaging term.  It's also lazy scripting, too.

Now if you're making an entertainment that is servicing ONLY to the faithful (like an online fan film)?  It's perfectly OK.   If you're aiming at a mass audience?  Then you may have to put away the DVDs of old episodes/movies and actually tell a real story and create some characters....

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Yeah--the term really is disrespectful to die hard fans, and those people SHOULD be catered to--as long as that mass audience will be able to follow along.

Most of the time, writers do accomplish this task, and usually the only ones who complain are just haters. 

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Jeeeeezzzzzzuzzzzzz, even ROGUE ONE has already an official teaser poster.

12987042_10209155439662290_7089159899150

How about that other space movie.....I think the title is.......STAR TREK BEYOND ? LOL

Paramount, damn you, do something.

Gus

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Am I the only one that thinks Star Wars should move beyond the "I'm a nobody - I meet someone - now i'm the choosen - now I fight evil" formula? No problem with SW, I love it, but for crying out loud, it's starting to get a little saturated. There have to be more dangerous forces out there that are not ALWAYS the godamn empire.

I think we'll see that in time... and perhaps as early as the Han Solo movie... I can see the Hutt's, Bounty Hunters, or some other criminal organization being the bid baddies in such a film, and the Empire just being something to avoid.

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Well, Disney is making more on purpose.  I'm guessing the EPISODES are going to be the highest grossing films, while the side movies will be solid hits.

I'm also guessing Rogue One will have a lower budget than Episode 8.

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Yeah--the term really is disrespectful to die hard fans, and those people SHOULD be catered to--as long as that mass audience will be able to follow along.

Most of the time, writers do accomplish this task, and usually the only ones who complain are just haters. 

I agree and disagree with that.  "Haters" is also a blanket term that can serve to mask genuine, legitimate criticism.

There is an unprecedented democratization in entertainment that never really existed before the internet.   Back in those days, it was largely professional critics and the occasional fan who could be bothered to write a letter to... someone (Starlog magazine, perhaps?).   Feedback was a lot scarcer then.  Part of me thinks that movies were braver in that age (at least more experimental), but these days everyone tries to walk that balance between fan expectation and what is proven to be profitable.  Sometimes, sadly, they're not always congruent; and in most cases?  The money wins...

Well, Disney is making more on purpose.  I'm guessing the EPISODES are going to be the highest grossing films, while the side movies will be solid hits.

I'm also guessing Rogue One will have a lower budget than Episode 8.

JJ Abrams brought in Episode VII for $200 million; pretty good, considering all that was onscreen.  I'd imagine that Rogue One might come in a bit less than that (they don't need to get Harrison Ford, for example), but that's not a guarantee that a crafty Episode director like Rian Johnson ("Looper") couldn't bring in his movie a bit less than a more excessive director of a standalone movie.   I think it'll be a case-by-case basis.  

And Disney will be swimming in money either way, so I doubt it'll matter to them...

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I see absolutely nothing wrong with this. You have real sets, all tying back to the production designs of the original Star Wars, and the potential for Darth Vader in a story not having to do with anything involving Jedi. Lucasfilm confirmed that ILM were constructing a Vader suit that was wholly identical to his original 1977 suit. This has all the makings to a rip-roaring look into the actual war that's supposedly part of this Galactic Civil War. Bring it the f*** on.

Ditto. 

Great trailer. looking forward to this. 

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There is an unprecedented democratization in entertainment that never really existed before the internet.   Back in those days, it was largely professional critics and the occasional fan who could be bothered to write a letter to... someone (Starlog magazine, perhaps?).   Feedback was a lot scarcer then.  Part of me thinks that movies were braver in that age (at least more experimental), but these days everyone tries to walk that balance between fan expectation and what is proven to be profitable.  Sometimes, sadly, they're not always congruent; and in most cases?  The money wins...

Some truth to that, though certain fanbases were fairly vocal.  Would we have got TWOK if TMP wasn't so negatively received?  I think the internet basically took that kind of fandom and jacked it up on steroids, giving more access to the fan that is passionate, but won't put a stamp on an envelope.

Plus, it's easier to be nasty when hiding behind a name that isn't yours.

Ultimately, like the broken record I can sometimes be, it's a matter of who is in charge.  Get a guy who is not only a fan, but talented, and you will get a good movie, like Moffat.  It's not just being a fan, but you have to understand what resonated with the character in the first place.  I think that's why Superman Returns failed.  Singer clearly loved the material, but focused on the wrong things and didn't seem to get what was so amazing about Superman.  He also focused on the Donner films rather than making a Singer film.  the ONLY thing he should have kept was the music.  AND, the casting was all wrong.

JJ Abrams brought in Episode VII for $200 million; pretty good, considering all that was onscreen.  I'd imagine that Rogue One might come in a bit less than that (they don't need to get Harrison Ford, for example), but that's not a guarantee that a crafty Episode director like Rian Johnson ("Looper") couldn't bring in his movie a bit less than a more excessive director of a standalone movie.   I think it'll be a case-by-case basis.  

And Disney will be swimming in money either way, so I doubt it'll matter to them...

 

All true of course, but sometimes a big budget isn't a good thing, because you can attempt to disguise script shortcomings with big effects.  That may look cool, but it doesn't make the movie better.  Michael Bay movies are stereotypes for this style.  And unfortunately, so is Zack Snyder.


While TFA was hardly perfect, and borrowed too heavily from the original, at least Abrams showed heart, and knew what to rip off.  I still say the movie was a 6.5-7, and is overrated, but that still puts it in the "I liked it" category, unlike the prequels, where the best one was a 3.5-4.

You don't need a big budget if you have a strong script.  Look at Deadpool.

 

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Some truth to that, though certain fanbases were fairly vocal.  Would we have got TWOK if TMP wasn't so negatively received?  I think the internet basically took that kind of fandom and jacked it up on steroids, giving more access to the fan that is passionate, but won't put a stamp on an envelope.

If there'd been an internet in 1982, I wonder if the studio would've ever had the courage to release a movie where Spock "dies."  

I remember back when the TV show "Entertainment Tonight" had a phone poll for audiences to see if Spock should die in TWOK and the fan responses (predictably) were overwhelmingly in favor of Spock's survival.  Arguably, that moment was kind of the beginning of modern day fandom; where movies began to get made on assembly lines, using only commercially viable parts.   The mass democratization of popular movies.

I'm not saying it's better or worse per se, but I do kind of miss going into movies and being totally surprised by a big studio franchise film.   These days, many of them feel a bit 'cookie cutter-ish.'   

These days, I can't imagine a major studio putting big money behind a TMP-style ST movie; let alone something like John Boorman's "Zardoz" or George Lucas' "THX-1138."   They'd simply not get made, or if they were?  They'd be independent movie 'orphans', without any studio support whatsoever.

Part of me misses that more experimental vibe.

You don't need a big budget if you have a strong script.  Look at Deadpool.

Deadpool also works because it is an anarchic satire of the kinds of superhero movies other studios take oh-so-seriously.  Deadpool had the freedom to basically give its own genre the big middle finger.   I don't think of it as a template that could be used for a Star Wars or Star Trek kind of franchise. 

All true of course, but sometimes a big budget isn't a good thing, because you can attempt to disguise script shortcomings with big effects.  That may look cool, but it doesn't make the movie better.  Michael Bay movies are stereotypes for this style.  And unfortunately, so is Zack Snyder.

^
Agreed.   Though both have made movies in the past that I enjoyed.  Snyder's "Dawn of the Dead" was (IMO) his best movie, as it wisely focused on a group of characters and not just FX and butt-numbing, repetitive action.   And even Michael Bay made "The Rock"; which, while excessive as all hell, also had a great father-son chemistry between Nicholas Cage and Sean Connery.   Their pairing made that movie for me.

I don't see either filmmaker ever returning to their roots, sadly.

Luckily JJ Abrams is not following too closely in their footsteps.  His movies, like James Cameron's, always have memorable characters front-and-center,  as well as tons of spectacle/action.    As for Rian Johnson (director of Episode VIII)?   Time will tell.   I was a bit less-than-impressed with "Looper" but there were seeds of interesting filmmaking throughout.   

But I have to say, "Rogue One"'s trailer impressed me not just with the fan service moments, but also with the scale; I thought this was going to be the smaller, indie, 'fan-film' SW movie, but apparently it'll be as big and epic as any of the Chapter movies of the series.  

That was an unexpected surprise, I have to admit...

 

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Some truth to that, though certain fanbases were fairly vocal.  Would we have got TWOK if TMP wasn't so negatively received?  I think the internet basically took that kind of fandom and jacked it up on steroids, giving more access to the fan that is passionate, but won't put a stamp on an envelope.

If there'd been an internet in 1982, I wonder if the studio would've ever had the courage to release a movie where Spock "dies."  

I remember back when the TV show "Entertainment Tonight" had a phone poll for audiences to see if Spock should die in TWOK and the fan responses (predictably) were overwhelmingly in favor of Spock's survival.  Arguably, that moment was kind of the beginning of modern day fandom; where movies began to get made on assembly lines, using only commercially viable parts.   The mass democratization of popular movies.

I'm not saying it's better or worse per se, but I do kind of miss going into movies and being totally surprised by a big studio franchise film.   These days, many of them feel a bit 'cookie cutter-ish.'   

These days, I can't imagine a major studio putting big money behind a TMP-style ST movie; let alone something like John Boorman's "Zardoz" or George Lucas' "THX-1138."   They'd simply not get made, or if they were?  They'd be independent movie 'orphans', without any studio support whatsoever.

Part of me misses that more experimental vibe.

You don't need a big budget if you have a strong script.  Look at Deadpool.

Deadpool also works because it is an anarchic satire of the kinds of superhero movies other studios take oh-so-seriously.  Deadpool had the freedom to basically give its own genre the big middle finger.   I don't think of it as a template that could be used for a Star Wars or Star Trek kind of franchise. 

All true of course, but sometimes a big budget isn't a good thing, because you can attempt to disguise script shortcomings with big effects.  That may look cool, but it doesn't make the movie better.  Michael Bay movies are stereotypes for this style.  And unfortunately, so is Zack Snyder.

^
Agreed.   Though both have made movies in the past that I enjoyed.  Snyder's "Dawn of the Dead" was (IMO) his best movie, as it wisely focused on a group of characters and not just FX and butt-numbing, repetitive action.   And even Michael Bay made "The Rock"; which, while excessive as all hell, also had a great father-son chemistry between Nicholas Cage and Sean Connery.   Their pairing made that movie for me.

I don't see either filmmaker ever returning to their roots, sadly.

Luckily JJ Abrams is not following too closely in their footsteps.  His movies, like James Cameron's, always have memorable characters front-and-center,  as well as tons of spectacle/action.    As for Rian Johnson (director of Episode VIII)?   Time will tell.   I was a bit less-than-impressed with "Looper" but there were seeds of interesting filmmaking throughout.   

But I have to say, "Rogue One"'s trailer impressed me not just with the fan service moments, but also with the scale; I thought this was going to be the smaller, indie, 'fan-film' SW movie, but apparently it'll be as big and epic as any of the Chapter movies of the series.  

That was an unexpected surprise, I have to admit...

 

Regarding experimental vibes in movie-making... I'm not sure if it's an outright classic, but last year's Ex Machina was a memorable low budget movie that was character-based and surprising. Granted, it was a British indie movie, but these things still happen... Maybe it's just not something to expect from the direction of Hollywood, not in movie theatres anyway. (TV is another whole conversation.) But if writer/directors like Alex Garland continue to follow their own muse rather than the Hollywood paradigm, we'll get more thoughtful and character-driven genre pics like that one. One hopes. 

That said, maybe these "side-prequels" (we need a better word) are an area where studios will begin to experiment. Of course they have to make money - it's the movie business after all - but the possibility is there. Now that they can breathe a little and know that their investment will return, and then some, they'll relax the jackboot a little. Don't laugh - it's not absolutely impossible... 

 

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^

Funny you mentioned "Ex Machina", Robin... I'd been thinking about it a lot lately, and so I just broke down and picked up the DVD (the real sign of a good movie is when you find yourself thinking and exploring it in your head long after you've seen it, right?).   When I first saw it, I was kind of hoping (?) we'd see a bit of optimism with the subject of AI, but appreciating the movie on its own merits (and not my silly expectations) and it gets a lot better...

That said, maybe these "side-prequels" (we need a better word) are an area where studios will begin to experiment. Of course they have to make money - it's the movie business after all - but the possibility is there. Now that they can breathe a little and know that their investment will return, and then some, they'll relax the jackboot a little. Don't laugh - it's not absolutely impossible... 

It's a good sign that Disney is hiring filmmakers who, like George Lucas (ironically), cut their teeth on lower-budgeted indie films like Rian Johnson's "Looper" or Gareth Edwards' pre-Godzilla work.   "Looper" wasn't a spectacular hit in cinemas, but it gained a strong cult following afterward.   

I agree that these 'side-quels' (nah, that still sucks, doesn't it?) offer the perfect arena where Disney can allow a little bit of artistic breathing room, and perhaps we might get a more interesting and richer overall Star Wars cinematic tapestry for it.   So many filmmakers today were directly inspired by Star Wars growing up (JJ Abrams for one).   It's interesting to see Star Wars as reflected in their eyes; what does it mean to them? 

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^

Funny you mentioned "Ex Machina", Robin... I'd been thinking about it a lot lately, and so I just broke down and picked up the DVD (the real sign of a good movie is when you find yourself thinking and exploring it in your head long after you've seen it, right?).   When I first saw it, I was kind of hoping (?) we'd see a bit of optimism with the subject of AI, but appreciating the movie on its own merits (and not my silly expectations) and it gets a lot better...

That said, maybe these "side-prequels" (we need a better word) are an area where studios will begin to experiment. Of course they have to make money - it's the movie business after all - but the possibility is there. Now that they can breathe a little and know that their investment will return, and then some, they'll relax the jackboot a little. Don't laugh - it's not absolutely impossible... 

It's a good sign that Disney is hiring filmmakers who, like George Lucas (ironically), cut their teeth on lower-budgeted indie films like Rian Johnson's "Looper" or Gareth Edwards' pre-Godzilla work.   "Looper" wasn't a spectacular hit in cinemas, but it gained a strong cult following afterward.   

I agree that these 'side-quels' (nah, that still sucks, doesn't it?) offer the perfect arena where Disney can allow a little bit of artistic breathing room, and perhaps we might get a more interesting and richer overall Star Wars cinematic tapestry for it.   So many filmmakers today were directly inspired by Star Wars growing up (JJ Abrams for one).   It's interesting to see Star Wars as reflected in their eyes; what does it mean to them? 

I think it could get really interesting - if Disney allows it. Star Wars as a cultural phenomenon is probably better known than any other in terms of a worldwide fandom. Perhaps this is just the beginning of a deeper, wider exploration of that aspect of human connectivity than has yet been seen, where the line between pro and fan becomes ever more blurred. It's kind of great to see the creativity that SW and similar fandoms inspire, but I have a feeling we're at the beginning of a new phase of it, for all sorts of reasons. 

I haven't seen Looper, so I should check it out. I know next to nothing about Rian Johnson. I was, however, a big fan of Gareth Edwards' Monsters, which was an odd, haunting, dreamlike film. There were hints of that sensibility in Godzilla, but I got the sense that he was as much being pulled along by that juggernaut as he was in charge of it. Here's hoping he learned from that, and how to impress his own vision upon Rogue One. 

Instead of 'side sequel' or 'spin-off,' how about 'Obliquel'...? :)

 

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^

Funny you mentioned "Ex Machina", Robin... I'd been thinking about it a lot lately, and so I just broke down and picked up the DVD (the real sign of a good movie is when you find yourself thinking and exploring it in your head long after you've seen it, right?).   When I first saw it, I was kind of hoping (?) we'd see a bit of optimism with the subject of AI, but appreciating the movie on its own merits (and not my silly expectations) and it gets a lot better...

That said, maybe these "side-prequels" (we need a better word) are an area where studios will begin to experiment. Of course they have to make money - it's the movie business after all - but the possibility is there. Now that they can breathe a little and know that their investment will return, and then some, they'll relax the jackboot a little. Don't laugh - it's not absolutely impossible... 

It's a good sign that Disney is hiring filmmakers who, like George Lucas (ironically), cut their teeth on lower-budgeted indie films like Rian Johnson's "Looper" or Gareth Edwards' pre-Godzilla work.   "Looper" wasn't a spectacular hit in cinemas, but it gained a strong cult following afterward.   

I agree that these 'side-quels' (nah, that still sucks, doesn't it?) offer the perfect arena where Disney can allow a little bit of artistic breathing room, and perhaps we might get a more interesting and richer overall Star Wars cinematic tapestry for it.   So many filmmakers today were directly inspired by Star Wars growing up (JJ Abrams for one).   It's interesting to see Star Wars as reflected in their eyes; what does it mean to them? 

I think it could get really interesting - if Disney allows it. Star Wars as a cultural phenomenon is probably better known than any other in terms of a worldwide fandom. Perhaps this is just the beginning of a deeper, wider exploration of that aspect of human connectivity than has yet been seen, where the line between pro and fan becomes ever more blurred. It's kind of great to see the creativity that SW and similar fandoms inspire, but I have a feeling we're at the beginning of a new phase of it, for all sorts of reasons. 

I haven't seen Looper, so I should check it out. I know next to nothing about Rian Johnson. I was, however, a big fan of Gareth Edwards' Monsters, which was an odd, haunting, dreamlike film. There were hints of that sensibility in Godzilla, but I got the sense that he was as much being pulled along by that juggernaut as he was in charge of it. Here's hoping he learned from that, and how to impress his own vision upon Rogue One. 

Instead of 'side sequel' or 'spin-off,' how about 'Obliquel'...? :)

 

Love 'obliquel'...:laugh:

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Awesome New ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY Images; Plus Character Names And Details Revealed
 
A preview of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: The Official Visual Story Guide provides new looks at our main heroes, as well as first glimpse of some alien characters, and Darth Vader himself! Check it out...
 

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Disney Reportedly Unhappy With ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY
 
Disney execs are reportedly unhappy with what they've seen of director Gareth Edwards' Rogue One: A Star Wars Story and have slated expensive reshoots for July ahead of the film's December release date.
 

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