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Scotty

Captain Sulu

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I have been thinking alot about Star Trek lately, one thing came to mind about what George Takei once said about Generations. As you may or may not know Sulu had a daughter, she was the helm officer of the Enterprise-B. takei reaction was who was her mother? I am not too fussed on Takei in general. Heres my anwser, to his question.

Janice Rand!!!!

 

They seemed to be very close during TOS, Charlie X is one example. Another example, she was featured in Flashback on the Excelisor. Do you think they got hitched and had a family? There is your answer Mr. Takei. 

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Has Sulu's orientation ever been conclusively established?  I'm surprised Mr. Takei wouldn't take the opportunity to develop Sulu's backstory to the point where he married another man and they adopted a daughter...

Edited by Captain_Bravo

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Has Sulu's orientation ever been conclusively established?  I'm surprised Mr. Takei wouldn't take the opportunity to develop Sulu's backstory to the point where he married another man and they adopted a daughter...

Well, that depends.  If you accept the fan film "World Enough and Time" from ST Phase II/New Voyages (as I do), which starred Takei himself as the older Hikaru Sulu, he is clearly heterosexual.  He met the mother of his alternate-timeline child on an assignment in a shuttlecraft when they were stranded on the planet Caliban together, and they had a daughter Alana.   I accept this as my personal 'head canon', as it dovetailed nicely within continuity (a bit of a reset button at the end, but with a twist).  Not to mention it starred George Takei himself as the character.  Works for me. 

There are also the various episodes of TOS where we see him flirting with women; such as "Mudd's Women",  "Way To Eden", "Mirror, Mirror" (that was mirror-Sulu, but it's not inconceivable that they share a sexual orientation) and yes, even Rand in "Charlie X" (although that seemed more like friendly coworkers than a sexual tension thing).   True, those examples don't negate Sulu being bisexual (a possibility), but if you go only by the information given onscreen?  It's not unreasonable to assume the character is heterosexual. 

Personally I don't see why it is difficult to accept a gay actor playing a heterosexual character; no one wondered about Tom Hanks' sexual orientation when he played a gay lawyer in "Philadelphia" or when Bruce Davison played a gay man in "Longtime Companion."   The late Rock Hudson had a long career playing heterosexual leads (esp. in romantic comedies with Doris Day) and no one ever lost sleep over it.    Jim Parsons plays Sheldon Cooper on "Big Bang Theory"; an unusual but heterosexual theoretical physicist in a committed relationship with Amy Farah Fowler (the inimitable Mayim Bialik).  In that context, George Takei playing a heterosexual Hikaru Sulu is not at all unusual.   The actor is gay, some of his characters (including Hikaru Sulu) are not.  It's really that simple. 

 

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I haven't watched the fan films in years (I probably should, though, just in case this lawsuit of Paramount vs. Axanar gains traction), so I'll have to check them out.

Please believe me when I say that I don't have a problem with homosexuals playing heterosexuals (there's also Matt Bomer, formerly of "White Collar" too), or vice versa, and I don't expect parity between real life and the small screen.  I only want them to be good actors portraying compelling or interesting characters.  I only meant that it would present a different way of thinking about Sulu and his family, especially in the current day and age with advances for the GLBTQ community, and in light of the fact that stories featuring openly gay couples in the Trek series (e.g., "Blood and Fire") got shelved. 

Edited by Captain_Bravo

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I haven't watched the fan films in years (I probably should, though, just in case this lawsuit of Paramount vs. Axanar gains traction), so I'll have to check them out.

Please believe me when I say that I don't have a problem with homosexuals playing heterosexuals (there's also Matt Bomer, formerly of "White Collar" too), or vice versa, and I don't expect parity between real life and the small screen.  I only want them to be good actors portraying compelling or interesting characters.  I only meant that it would present a different way of thinking about Sulu and his family, especially in the current day and age with advances for the GLBTQ community, and in light of the fact that stories featuring openly gay couples in the Trek series (e.g., "Blood and Fire") got shelved. 

Oh, I understand.  And I'm not singling you out at all.   I'm kind of responding to all of the hubbub I read about George Takei somehow being 'unqualified' to play a straight character all of the sudden; when he successfully played said character for decades without any qualms whatsoever.  The only difference is that we learned something new about the actor since then, but it doesn't change his prior performance. 

For me, it's a non-issue; gay actor plays straight character.  Takei has done enough for advocacy in his real-life (his long career in civic and social politics) that it doesn't necessarily need to enter his professional life, unless he chooses for it to do so.  

I remember seeing Takei as Grand Marshal in the Los Angeles Nissei (Japanese-American) parade back in the early 2000s (2004, I think? Curse my memory). He is also a major contributor/backer (he and his husband Brad) to the Nissei Museum in L.A.  He also ran for LA City Council back in the '80s, and has been a longtime advocate of Los Angeles mass transit; eventually culminating in the L.A subway system (a system I've personally enjoyed a few times myself!).  

So while his advocacy for civil rights is, no doubt, very important to him (and to everyone, really), he was active in politics long before he came out.   His being gay is but one aspect of his life, but it isn't his sole defining trait (as many online seem to think these days).

Interesting note about actor Matt Bomer; Bomer also played a straight character in the darkly funny Space:1999/'70s science fiction satire "Space Station 76" (2013), and a straight actor (Patrick Wilson) played a closeted, conflicted gay character.  I thought that was a clever twist, and it was completely convincing (even in a parody-comedy like "Space Station 76").

Space_Station_76_Poster.jpg

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I haven't watched the fan films in years (I probably should, though, just in case this lawsuit of Paramount vs. Axanar gains traction), so I'll have to check them out.

Please believe me when I say that I don't have a problem with homosexuals playing heterosexuals (there's also Matt Bomer, formerly of "White Collar" too), or vice versa, and I don't expect parity between real life and the small screen.  I only want them to be good actors portraying compelling or interesting characters.  I only meant that it would present a different way of thinking about Sulu and his family, especially in the current day and age with advances for the GLBTQ community, and in light of the fact that stories featuring openly gay couples in the Trek series (e.g., "Blood and Fire") got shelved. 

Oh, I understand.  And I'm not singling you out at all.   I'm kind of responding to all of the hubbub I read about George Takei somehow being 'unqualified' to play a straight character all of the sudden; when he successfully played said character for decades without any qualms whatsoever.  The only difference is that we learned something new about the actor since then, but it doesn't change his prior performance. 

For me, it's a non-issue; gay actor plays straight character.  Takei has done enough for advocacy in his real-life (his long career in civic and social politics) that it doesn't necessarily need to enter his professional life, unless he chooses for it to do so.  

I remember seeing Takei as Grand Marshal in the Los Angeles Nissei (Japanese-American) parade back in the early 2000s (2004, I think? Curse my memory). He is also a major contributor/backer (he and his husband Brad) to the Nissei Museum in L.A.  He also ran for LA City Council back in the '80s, and has been a longtime advocate of Los Angeles mass transit; eventually culminating in the L.A subway system (a system I've personally enjoyed a few times myself!).  

So while his advocacy for civil rights is, no doubt, very important to him (and to everyone, really), he was active in politics long before he came out.   His being gay is but one aspect of his life, but it isn't his sole defining trait (as many online seem to think these days).

Interesting note about actor Matt Bomer; Bomer also played a straight character in the darkly funny Space:1999/'70s science fiction satire "Space Station 76" (2013), and a straight actor (Patrick Wilson) played a closeted, conflicted gay character.  I thought that was a clever twist, and it was completely convincing (even in a parody-comedy like "Space Station 76").

Space_Station_76_Poster.jpg

Not to distract from the topic at hand, but I just wanna throw it out there that I was really disappointed with Space Station 76.

Anyhow, I'm not sure it matters who Demora's mother is, but I'm not sure I dig or can get behind the Rand theory.

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I haven't watched the fan films in years (I probably should, though, just in case this lawsuit of Paramount vs. Axanar gains traction), so I'll have to check them out.

Please believe me when I say that I don't have a problem with homosexuals playing heterosexuals (there's also Matt Bomer, formerly of "White Collar" too), or vice versa, and I don't expect parity between real life and the small screen.  I only want them to be good actors portraying compelling or interesting characters.  I only meant that it would present a different way of thinking about Sulu and his family, especially in the current day and age with advances for the GLBTQ community, and in light of the fact that stories featuring openly gay couples in the Trek series (e.g., "Blood and Fire") got shelved. 

Oh, I understand.  And I'm not singling you out at all.   I'm kind of responding to all of the hubbub I read about George Takei somehow being 'unqualified' to play a straight character all of the sudden; when he successfully played said character for decades without any qualms whatsoever.  The only difference is that we learned something new about the actor since then, but it doesn't change his prior performance. 

For me, it's a non-issue; gay actor plays straight character.  Takei has done enough for advocacy in his real-life (his long career in civic and social politics) that it doesn't necessarily need to enter his professional life, unless he chooses for it to do so.  

I remember seeing Takei as Grand Marshal in the Los Angeles Nissei (Japanese-American) parade back in the early 2000s (2004, I think? Curse my memory). He is also a major contributor/backer (he and his husband Brad) to the Nissei Museum in L.A.  He also ran for LA City Council back in the '80s, and has been a longtime advocate of Los Angeles mass transit; eventually culminating in the L.A subway system (a system I've personally enjoyed a few times myself!).  

So while his advocacy for civil rights is, no doubt, very important to him (and to everyone, really), he was active in politics long before he came out.   His being gay is but one aspect of his life, but it isn't his sole defining trait (as many online seem to think these days).

Interesting note about actor Matt Bomer; Bomer also played a straight character in the darkly funny Space:1999/'70s science fiction satire "Space Station 76" (2013), and a straight actor (Patrick Wilson) played a closeted, conflicted gay character.  I thought that was a clever twist, and it was completely convincing (even in a parody-comedy like "Space Station 76").

Space_Station_76_Poster.jpg

Not to distract from the topic at hand, but I just wanna throw it out there that I was really disappointed with Space Station 76.

Anyhow, I'm not sure it matters who Demora's mother is, but I'm not sure I dig or can get behind the Rand theory.

Yeah, Demora doesn't look a whole lot like Janice Rand... of course, they could've adopted but nah; I don't see Sulu and Rand being THAT close.   In "World Enough and Time" they had a casual banter that was more genial work buddies rather than bedmates. 

And yes, Space Station 76 was a disappointment; should've been more "Galaxy Quest" and not obnoxious "That '70s Show" stuff. 

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What's the timeframe between the end of TOS and the movies in cannon. I thought it was around 15 years. If Sulu's daughter is in her mid twenties,her birth should be just before the TOS starts. 

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What's the timeframe between the end of TOS and the movies in cannon. I thought it was around 15 years. If Sulu's daughter is in her mid twenties,her birth should be just before the TOS starts. 

the timeframe depends on point of view. But I think a bit of time obviously passed between series and first movie, and hust how everything visually changed a few years between the first and second movie. 

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What's the timeframe between the end of TOS and the movies in cannon. I thought it was around 15 years. If Sulu's daughter is in her mid twenties,her birth should be just before the TOS starts. 

Do we know she's in her mid-20s?  Kirk notes that Chekov in TOS was even "younger" than Demora, and Chekov in TOS stated (in "Who Mourns for Adonais?") that he was 22.   I'm guessing Demora could be anywhere from 19-21.   And as lovely as she is, I don't quite buy actress Jacqueline Kim as being younger than that in the movie... :P 

Also according to the ST Encyclopedia, the 5 year mission ended in 2269, TMP takes place in 2271, and the Excelsior launch in GEN takes place in 2295; plenty of time for Sulu to fall in love and have a daughter who'd in her early 20s by the events of GEN. 

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I haven't watched the fan films in years (I probably should, though, just in case this lawsuit of Paramount vs. Axanar gains traction), so I'll have to check them out.

Please believe me when I say that I don't have a problem with homosexuals playing heterosexuals (there's also Matt Bomer, formerly of "White Collar" too), or vice versa, and I don't expect parity between real life and the small screen.  I only want them to be good actors portraying compelling or interesting characters.  I only meant that it would present a different way of thinking about Sulu and his family, especially in the current day and age with advances for the GLBTQ community, and in light of the fact that stories featuring openly gay couples in the Trek series (e.g., "Blood and Fire") got shelved. 

Oh, I understand.  And I'm not singling you out at all.   I'm kind of responding to all of the hubbub I read about George Takei somehow being 'unqualified' to play a straight character all of the sudden; when he successfully played said character for decades without any qualms whatsoever.  The only difference is that we learned something new about the actor since then, but it doesn't change his prior performance. 

For me, it's a non-issue; gay actor plays straight character.  Takei has done enough for advocacy in his real-life (his long career in civic and social politics) that it doesn't necessarily need to enter his professional life, unless he chooses for it to do so.  

I remember seeing Takei as Grand Marshal in the Los Angeles Nissei (Japanese-American) parade back in the early 2000s (2004, I think? Curse my memory). He is also a major contributor/backer (he and his husband Brad) to the Nissei Museum in L.A.  He also ran for LA City Council back in the '80s, and has been a longtime advocate of Los Angeles mass transit; eventually culminating in the L.A subway system (a system I've personally enjoyed a few times myself!).  

So while his advocacy for civil rights is, no doubt, very important to him (and to everyone, really), he was active in politics long before he came out.   His being gay is but one aspect of his life, but it isn't his sole defining trait (as many online seem to think these days).

Interesting note about actor Matt Bomer; Bomer also played a straight character in the darkly funny Space:1999/'70s science fiction satire "Space Station 76" (2013), and a straight actor (Patrick Wilson) played a closeted, conflicted gay character.  I thought that was a clever twist, and it was completely convincing (even in a parody-comedy like "Space Station 76").

Space_Station_76_Poster.jpg

Not to distract from the topic at hand, but I just wanna throw it out there that I was really disappointed with Space Station 76.

Anyhow, I'm not sure it matters who Demora's mother is, but I'm not sure I dig or can get behind the Rand theory.

Yeah, Demora doesn't look a whole lot like Janice Rand... of course, they could've adopted but nah; I don't see Sulu and Rand being THAT close.   In "World Enough and Time" they had a casual banter that was more genial work buddies rather than bedmates. 

And yes, Space Station 76 was a disappointment; should've been more "Galaxy Quest" and not obnoxious "That '70s Show" stuff. 

I can say the same for Shinzon, the nu-Trek cast. She was eaiting in the lounge in Star Trek III? It was a thought that makes you think. It made me think as I watched Generations recently. It pits her being born around 2272. This would be her first assignment on a ship, much like Harry Kims. This is what make its interesting when people say about Captain Sulu in the 24th century in the 2360's and 2370's. It would likely been her. I haven't seen a lot of the fan films so I don't know. 

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