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THE GOD THING

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40 years ago, in 1975, the late Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry wrote a screenplay that he hoped would be the basis for the first Star Trek motion picture. Paramount rejected it, feeling it was too controversial. It was called Star Trek The God Thing.

In her book Inside Trek, former Roddenbery secretary Susan Sackett talks about The God Thing. Here are excerpts from the book.

It seemed simple enough. With a $3 to $5 million budget allocated, Gene Roddenberry could write the kind of Star Trek script he has always wanted to do. He arrived on the Paramount lot in May of 1975, ordered up a stack of fresh white typing paper from studio supplies and began to write Star Trek II. By June 30 he had turned out what he felt was a good first draft of the script. The studio executives disagreed.

The story begins with Spock on Vulcan, emaciated, bedraggled, meditating with the Vulcan Masters. His thoughts are disrupted by something about to happen to Earth and his old friend Jim Kirk. He has not become truly Vulcan. Pai-ad, one of the nine Masters, speaks with him:

PAI-AD

Did you think to cast out the human within yourself? You have not.

SPOCK

Then, I am nothing, Pai-ad. I cannot exist in two halves.

PAI-AD

Your halves are needed, Spock. Move your thoughts with me to Earth.

The story then moves directly from Vulcan to Earth orbit and the drydocks over the San Francisco Naval Yards, where the Enterprise is being refitted. On the planet below, people are beginning to receive mental impressions of a returning God. At the same time a huge Object, one thousand times larger than a starship, is moving toward Earth, knocking off the U.S.S. Potemkin and hurtling a cluster of asteroids toward Earth. Kirk, now a grounded admiral, assembles his old crew (all of whom have risen higher in rank), and they take the newly refitted Enterprise on a mission of interception with the alien claiming to be God. The Object turns out to be more than just a vessel--it is a computer form so advanced it is a living entity itself. However, we discover that this God they've worshipped is actually the Deceiver, the computer-programmed remains of a race who were "cast out" from their dimension and into this one. At the end, Kirk wins out, the entity returns to its other dimension, and the Enterprise crew is left with a gift-- they return to Earth and discover that the "deceiver-God" entity had made them a gift of time in which they are suddenly younger and are now returning from their first five-year mission. Interestingly enough, many of these same story elements ended up in the ST-TMP script three years later.

Gene had been iconoclastically asking what if the God of the Old Testament, full of tirades and demands to be worshipped, actually turned out to be Lucifer. If so, was the serpent's offer of the Fruit of Knowledge actually a gift from the real God? Captain Kirk versus God. This was not the story Paramount had expected! The movie was postponed from fall 1975 until the following spring so that a new script could be found.

More details are given in the books Trek: The Lost Years, by Edward Gross and Lost Voyages of Trek and the Next Generation, by Bill Planer. Excerpts below.

"They turned me down a couple of times," said Roddenberry regarding a film version of the series, "then they finally said, 'Write a script and we'll give you an office on the lot and think about it.' They were not that serious about [it] when we first started. I think they had in mind a $2-$3 million picture."

William Shatner, working on the series Barbary Coast, finds GR typing away in an office, working

on the script.

"So I said, 'There's gonna be a movie? What's it gonna be about?' He said, 'First of all, we have to explain how you guys got older. So what we have to do is move everybody up a rank. You become an Admiral, and the rest of the cast become Starfleet Commanders. One day a force comes toward Earth--might be God, might be the Devil--breaking everything in its path, except the minds of the starship commanders. So we gotta find all the original crewmen for the starship Enterprise, but first--where is Spock? He's back on Vulcan doing R&R five year mission--seven years of R&R. He swam back upstream. So we gotta go get him.' I call that show, 'What Makes Salmon Run?' So we get Spock, do battle and it was a great story, but the studio turned it down."

Although little is known about the resulting script, reports have stated that the premise questioned the very nature of God and the universe around us. Paramount was apparently not interested in a script which, essentially, pit Captain Kirk against God.

Director Richard Colla, who had helmed Roddenberry's The Questor Tapes, and a first season episode of TNG, was very familiar with that particular screenplay and recalls it fondly.

"That script was much more daring," he told journalist Edward Gross. "They went off in search of that thing from outer space that was affecting everything. By the time they got to the spaceship and got into its [the alien's] presence, it manifested itself and said, 'Do you know me?' Kirk said, 'No, I don't know who you are.' It said, 'Strange, how could you not know who I am?' So it shift-changed and became another image and said, 'Do you know me?' Kirk said, 'No, who are you?' It replied,

'The time has passed and you should know me by now.' It shifts shape again and comes up in the form of Christ the Carpenter, and says, 'Do you know me?' and Kirk said, 'Oh, now I know who you are.' And he says, 'How strange you didn't know these other forms of me.' Really, what Gene had written was that this 'thing' was sent forth to lay down the law; to communicate the law of the universe, and that as time goes on the law needs to be reinterpreted. And at that time 2,000 years ago, the law was interpreted by this Carpenter image. As time went on, the law was meant to be reinterpreted, and the Christ figure was meant to reappear in different forms. But this machine malfunctioned, and it was like a phonograph record that got caught in a groove and kept grooving back, grooving back, grooving back. It's important to understand the essence of all this and reinterpret it as time goes on. This was a little heavy for Paramount. It was meant to be strong and moving, and I'm sorry it never got made."

"I handed them a script and they turned it down,"

Roddenberry stated. "It was too controversial. It talked about concepts like, 'Who is God?' [in it] the Enterprise meets God in space; God is a life form, and I wanted to suggest that there may have been, at one time in the human beginning, an alien entity that early man believed was God, and kept those legends. But I also wanted to suggest that it might have been as much the Devil as it was God. After all, what kind of god would throw humans out of Paradise for eating the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge. One of the Vulcans on board, in a very logical way, says, 'If this is your God, he's not very impressive. He's got so many psychological problems; he's so insecure. He demands worship every seven days. He goes out and creates faulty humans and then blames them for his own mistakes. He's a pretty poor excuse for a supreme being.' Not surprisingly, that didn't sent [sic] the Paramount executives off crying with glee. But I think good science fiction, historically, has been used that way--to question everything."

In his book Star Trek Movie Memories, William Shatner talks about the plot of The God Thing.

"Somewhere out there," [Gene] starts off, his eyes widening as he continues, "there's this massive ... entity, this abstract, unknown life force that seems mechanical in nature, although it actually possesses its own highly advanced consciousness. It's a force thousands of times greater than anything intergalactic civilization has ever witnessed. It could be God, it could be Satan, and it's heading toward earth. It demands worship and assistance, and it's also in a highly volatile state of disrepair."

He goes on to tell me that the original crew of the Enterprise are now being embraced as heroes all over the galaxy. Spock has gone back to Vulcan to become head of their Science Academy. McCoy's married and living on a farm in the Midwest (although his wife, following in the time-honored tradition of women dumb enough to fall for an Enterprise crewman, is promptly killed off.) Everyone else has been given hefty promotions, and continues to serve on active duty.

Additionally, Starfleet has offered Kirk a prestigious but deskbound admiralcy, but he's passed, preferring to retain his rank as captain while acting as a sort of consultant/ troubleshooter aboard Federation spacecraft. As we find him, he's visiting the recently overhauled Enterprise, supervising her new captain, Pavel Chekov.

Throughout the bulk of the next two hours Kirk rounds up the old crew, while studying and ultimately battling this "God thing." As the drama builds and we finally approach the craft, the alien presence manifests itself on board the Enterprise in the form of a humanoid probe, which quickly begins shape-shifting while preaching about having traveled to earth many times, always in a noble effort to lay down the law of the cosmos. Its final image is that of Jesus Christ.

"You must help me!" the probe repeats, now bleeding from hands, feet and forehead. Kirk refuses, at which point the probe begins exhausting the last of its energy in a last-ditch violent rampage, commanding the Enterprise crew to provide the assistance it needs in order to survive.

Without warning, the force summons up the last of its remaining strength to blast Sulu, severing the crewman's legs in the process. When Spock attempts to comfort the mortally wounded Sulu he, too, is blasted and left for dead. With that expenditure of energy, the vessel is weakened to the point of vulnerability, and the Enterprise unleashes a barrage of firepower that destroys the craft.

"With that," says Gene, "we begin pondering the notion that perhaps mankind has finally evolved to the point where it's outgrown its need for gods, competent to account for its own behavior without the religiously imposed concepts of fear, guilt or divine intervention."

Thanks to The Complete Starfleet Library The God Thing for the book excerpts.

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Edited by GustavoLeao

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In his STAR TREK MOVIE MEMORIES book, William Shatner told the story that when Roddenberry finally got to read Shatner's story treatment he was quite nervous. Susan Sackett, Roddenberry's assistant at the time, took the pages from Roddenberry's hands and yelled "Bill is a bastard ! He stole your idea ! Bill is such a son of b#@&* !" Well, its no wonder that Roddenberry hated STAR TREK V and didnt want it to be part of the Star Trek canon, just like he did with the Animated Series.

Gus

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In his STAR TREK MOVIE MEMORIES book, William Shatner told the story that when Roddenberry finally got to read Shatner's story treatment he was quite nervous. Susan Sackett, Roddenberry's assistant at the time, took the pages from Roddenberry's hands and yelled "Bill is a bastard ! He stole your idea ! Bill is such a son of b#@&* !" Well, its no wonder that Roddenberry hated STAR TREK V and didnt want it to be part of the Star Trek canon, just like he did with the Animated Series.

Gus

Roddenberry (and perhaps Shatner) were both a bit obsessed with de-bunking godlike figures (that was a common theme in the series as well). But that title is just horrible; it's sounds like bad S1 TNG dialogue ("vicious animal things" "the Edo worship it as a god-thing"). What was up with Roddenberry's use of 'thing' as a suffix?

I imagine breakfast in the Roddenberry household, circa 1974: "Pass the cornflake-things, will you?" :giggle:

By the way, director Richard Colla went on to helm the spectacular 1978 3 hr. Battlestar Galactica pilot ("Saga of a Star World") and an episode of TNG ("The Last Outpost").

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I have never seen the 3-part pilot episode "Saga of a Star World", only the BATTLESTAR GALACTICA theatrical version of the pilot. sigh

Which one was released on DVD ? I know that the 3-part episode was released on DVD in the UK, but not in the US I think.

Gus

Edited by GustavoLeao

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I have never seen the 3-part pilot episode "Saga of a Star World", only the BATTLESTAR GALACTICA theatrical version of the pilot. sigh

Which one was released on DVD ? I know that the 3-part episode was released on DVD in the UK, but not in the US I think.

Gus

Actually the 3 hr. version of the 1978 pilot was released on DVD in the US as part of the 2003 BSG DVD box set.

It's also being released here in April on blu ray, as part of the complete Battlestar Galactica TOS set, including Galactica:1980 (it's already been on blu ray in Germany, I do believe...).

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Great news, I didnt know the original GALACTICA was going to be on Blu-Ray !!! Thanks for the info, Sehlat !

Time to watch some Hatch and Benedict chemistry again !

Gus

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I've been watching old Galactica on Netflix last few days. Really hope they will consider redoing the fx like I posted about a few months back.

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I've been watching old Galactica on Netflix last few days. Really hope they will consider redoing the fx like I posted about a few months back.

From what I understand, the upcoming blu ray release will not feature new FX... sadly.

A show like BSG (which overused the same repeated stock footage) could really reap the benefit of a CGI facelift...

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I think John Dykstra FX for the pilot just awesome. I was a big fan of Buck Rogers, which has decent FX, at the time (the best FX was Erin Gray in her catsuit haha) and when I saw Galactica for the first time on TV (the 2 hour theatrical version) I was kind of "Wow !" LOL

Gus

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The final episode where Galactica takes on the Basestar is lousy because they are throwing in all the old fx shots and they show the baseship blowing up numerous times LOL. There is also the episode where they go to the Eastern Alliance home planet of Terra and they are shown throwing a laser net of some kind over the planet to stop the nuclear missiles, but yet that isn't the orders being given from the bridge (I think the idea was to use Galactica's laser turrets to target them), what is shown makes no sense.

I always wished we could have seen Galactica take on the Eastern Alliance but with no season 2 it never did (the 90's comic depicted that it did happen though).

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40 years ago, in 1975, the late Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry wrote a screenplay that he hoped would be the basis for the first Star Trek motion picture. Paramount rejected it, feeling it was too controversial. It was called Star Trek The God Thing.

In her book Inside Trek, former Roddenbery secretary Susan Sackett talks about The God Thing. Here are excerpts from the book.

It seemed simple enough. With a $3 to $5 million budget allocated, Gene Roddenberry could write the kind of Star Trek script he has always wanted to do. He arrived on the Paramount lot in May of 1975, ordered up a stack of fresh white typing paper from studio supplies and began to write Star Trek II. By June 30 he had turned out what he felt was a good first draft of the script. The studio executives disagreed.

The story begins with Spock on Vulcan, emaciated, bedraggled, meditating with the Vulcan Masters. His thoughts are disrupted by something about to happen to Earth and his old friend Jim Kirk. He has not become truly Vulcan. Pai-ad, one of the nine Masters, speaks with him:

PAI-AD

Did you think to cast out the human within yourself? You have not.

SPOCK

Then, I am nothing, Pai-ad. I cannot exist in two halves.

PAI-AD

Your halves are needed, Spock. Move your thoughts with me to Earth.

The story then moves directly from Vulcan to Earth orbit and the drydocks over the San Francisco Naval Yards, where the Enterprise is being refitted. On the planet below, people are beginning to receive mental impressions of a returning God. At the same time a huge Object, one thousand times larger than a starship, is moving toward Earth, knocking off the U.S.S. Potemkin and hurtling a cluster of asteroids toward Earth. Kirk, now a grounded admiral, assembles his old crew (all of whom have risen higher in rank), and they take the newly refitted Enterprise on a mission of interception with the alien claiming to be God. The Object turns out to be more than just a vessel--it is a computer form so advanced it is a living entity itself. However, we discover that this God they've worshipped is actually the Deceiver, the computer-programmed remains of a race who were "cast out" from their dimension and into this one. At the end, Kirk wins out, the entity returns to its other dimension, and the Enterprise crew is left with a gift-- they return to Earth and discover that the "deceiver-God" entity had made them a gift of time in which they are suddenly younger and are now returning from their first five-year mission. Interestingly enough, many of these same story elements ended up in the ST-TMP script three years later.

Gene had been iconoclastically asking what if the God of the Old Testament, full of tirades and demands to be worshipped, actually turned out to be Lucifer. If so, was the serpent's offer of the Fruit of Knowledge actually a gift from the real God? Captain Kirk versus God. This was not the story Paramount had expected! The movie was postponed from fall 1975 until the following spring so that a new script could be found.

More details are given in the books Trek: The Lost Years, by Edward Gross and Lost Voyages of Trek and the Next Generation, by Bill Planer. Excerpts below.

"They turned me down a couple of times," said Roddenberry regarding a film version of the series, "then they finally said, 'Write a script and we'll give you an office on the lot and think about it.' They were not that serious about [it] when we first started. I think they had in mind a $2-$3 million picture."

William Shatner, working on the series Barbary Coast, finds GR typing away in an office, working

on the script.

"So I said, 'There's gonna be a movie? What's it gonna be about?' He said, 'First of all, we have to explain how you guys got older. So what we have to do is move everybody up a rank. You become an Admiral, and the rest of the cast become Starfleet Commanders. One day a force comes toward Earth--might be God, might be the Devil--breaking everything in its path, except the minds of the starship commanders. So we gotta find all the original crewmen for the starship Enterprise, but first--where is Spock? He's back on Vulcan doing R&R five year mission--seven years of R&R. He swam back upstream. So we gotta go get him.' I call that show, 'What Makes Salmon Run?' So we get Spock, do battle and it was a great story, but the studio turned it down."

Although little is known about the resulting script, reports have stated that the premise questioned the very nature of God and the universe around us. Paramount was apparently not interested in a script which, essentially, pit Captain Kirk against God.

Director Richard Colla, who had helmed Roddenberry's The Questor Tapes, and a first season episode of TNG, was very familiar with that particular screenplay and recalls it fondly.

"That script was much more daring," he told journalist Edward Gross. "They went off in search of that thing from outer space that was affecting everything. By the time they got to the spaceship and got into its [the alien's] presence, it manifested itself and said, 'Do you know me?' Kirk said, 'No, I don't know who you are.' It said, 'Strange, how could you not know who I am?' So it shift-changed and became another image and said, 'Do you know me?' Kirk said, 'No, who are you?' It replied,

'The time has passed and you should know me by now.' It shifts shape again and comes up in the form of Christ the Carpenter, and says, 'Do you know me?' and Kirk said, 'Oh, now I know who you are.' And he says, 'How strange you didn't know these other forms of me.' Really, what Gene had written was that this 'thing' was sent forth to lay down the law; to communicate the law of the universe, and that as time goes on the law needs to be reinterpreted. And at that time 2,000 years ago, the law was interpreted by this Carpenter image. As time went on, the law was meant to be reinterpreted, and the Christ figure was meant to reappear in different forms. But this machine malfunctioned, and it was like a phonograph record that got caught in a groove and kept grooving back, grooving back, grooving back. It's important to understand the essence of all this and reinterpret it as time goes on. This was a little heavy for Paramount. It was meant to be strong and moving, and I'm sorry it never got made."

"I handed them a script and they turned it down,"

Roddenberry stated. "It was too controversial. It talked about concepts like, 'Who is God?' [in it] the Enterprise meets God in space; God is a life form, and I wanted to suggest that there may have been, at one time in the human beginning, an alien entity that early man believed was God, and kept those legends. But I also wanted to suggest that it might have been as much the Devil as it was God. After all, what kind of god would throw humans out of Paradise for eating the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge. One of the Vulcans on board, in a very logical way, says, 'If this is your God, he's not very impressive. He's got so many psychological problems; he's so insecure. He demands worship every seven days. He goes out and creates faulty humans and then blames them for his own mistakes. He's a pretty poor excuse for a supreme being.' Not surprisingly, that didn't sent [sic] the Paramount executives off crying with glee. But I think good science fiction, historically, has been used that way--to question everything."

In his book Star Trek Movie Memories, William Shatner talks about the plot of The God Thing.

"Somewhere out there," [Gene] starts off, his eyes widening as he continues, "there's this massive ... entity, this abstract, unknown life force that seems mechanical in nature, although it actually possesses its own highly advanced consciousness. It's a force thousands of times greater than anything intergalactic civilization has ever witnessed. It could be God, it could be Satan, and it's heading toward earth. It demands worship and assistance, and it's also in a highly volatile state of disrepair."

He goes on to tell me that the original crew of the Enterprise are now being embraced as heroes all over the galaxy. Spock has gone back to Vulcan to become head of their Science Academy. McCoy's married and living on a farm in the Midwest (although his wife, following in the time-honored tradition of women dumb enough to fall for an Enterprise crewman, is promptly killed off.) Everyone else has been given hefty promotions, and continues to serve on active duty.

Additionally, Starfleet has offered Kirk a prestigious but deskbound admiralcy, but he's passed, preferring to retain his rank as captain while acting as a sort of consultant/ troubleshooter aboard Federation spacecraft. As we find him, he's visiting the recently overhauled Enterprise, supervising her new captain, Pavel Chekov.

Throughout the bulk of the next two hours Kirk rounds up the old crew, while studying and ultimately battling this "God thing." As the drama builds and we finally approach the craft, the alien presence manifests itself on board the Enterprise in the form of a humanoid probe, which quickly begins shape-shifting while preaching about having traveled to earth many times, always in a noble effort to lay down the law of the cosmos. Its final image is that of Jesus Christ.

"You must help me!" the probe repeats, now bleeding from hands, feet and forehead. Kirk refuses, at which point the probe begins exhausting the last of its energy in a last-ditch violent rampage, commanding the Enterprise crew to provide the assistance it needs in order to survive.

Without warning, the force summons up the last of its remaining strength to blast Sulu, severing the crewman's legs in the process. When Spock attempts to comfort the mortally wounded Sulu he, too, is blasted and left for dead. With that expenditure of energy, the vessel is weakened to the point of vulnerability, and the Enterprise unleashes a barrage of firepower that destroys the craft.

"With that," says Gene, "we begin pondering the notion that perhaps mankind has finally evolved to the point where it's outgrown its need for gods, competent to account for its own behavior without the religiously imposed concepts of fear, guilt or divine intervention."

Thanks to The Complete Starfleet Library The God Thing for the book excerpts.

Damn this is a wonderful find. Thank you, GustavoLeao, for posting this. I really wish Roddenberry had gone ahead with this idea. I think it would have been far braver than the idea of an evil alien god in V. Star Trek always skirted with the idea of what "god" truly is and if it is nothing more than a human concocted idea or an alien that was messing with us. The existence of Q should have put that "issue" to bed. If aliens like Q, Trelane, Apollo, the Prophets, "The Picard" etc. exist, then how big of a "leap" is it to simply see that if there were gods in human history, it was more than likely aliens messing with us.

Plus, after reading Paradise Lost, I've always been intrigued by the idea of Satan being the true "good guy" and God being the "villain". Jiddu Krishnamurti has this great quote after reading the Bible, he comments that he does not understand why a "devil" is needed when you have the "god" character. haha.

A shame such a thing was never explored in Trek. I guess it is easier to simply mock Apollo than say...a carpenter?

It's obvious Roddenberry was interjecting his own atheism into the story. The last quote kind of proves it. I guess either he or the studios didn't want to alienate too many people by going further.

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It is a bold idea (the treatment for TGT), but I can't imagine a studio in the '70s (or even today, for that matter) bankrolling such a highly controversial idea for a movie that basically says god is a malfunctioning machine. That would take serious balls for a studio to back that idea for a popular "family-friendly" movie/TV property like Star Trek...

Even The Final Frontier softened the blow with Kirk's line about god existing "... in the human heart." Controversy averted with a single line of dialogue (arguably to the detriment of the film....).

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Thank you, The Founder, this is actually an old TrekWeb article i wrote back in 2010.

This is a Roddenberry script that I really wanted to see produced - oe even adapt into a novel.

But as Sehlat said, its a too controversial idea, and Paramount would never produced this.

Gus

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Thank you, The Founder, this is actually an old TrekWeb article i wrote back in 2010.

This is a Roddenberry script that I really wanted to see produced - oe even adapt into a novel.

But as Sehlat said, its a too controversial idea, and Paramount would never produced this.

Gus

Denouncing god in a pop science fiction movie would make movie studio executives nervous even today; and perhaps in the less risk-averse, more experimental time of the 1970s as well (when some of the boldest and bravest ideas for movies were realized).

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They DID tackle something like this in the 70s - GOD TOLD ME TO just came out on blu-ray. Credibility falls apart near the end when you see stock footage from a 70s tv space show used in a seriously out of context way, but it is definitely edgy. And folks have flirted with some out there religious stuff in film -- the ending of THE RAPTURE is awesome in its subversiveness. And folks have said PROMETHEUS would have inflamed more people if it had been a good enough movie for anybody to give a crap about its themes, which definitely tread on GOD THING aspects.

I'd've loved to see GOD THING made, but not at the expense of missing out on TFF, which along with TWOK and TMP are the only trekmovies I have strong positive feelings about. PLANET OF THE TITANS (which PROMETHEUS also treads upon) is the lost TREK movie I really wish we'd gotten, and still think would work as a nice fresh start, with or without the existing characters.

Edited by trevanian

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I would love if the makers of STAR TREK movies could adapt the Roddenberry script for THE GOD THING into a future Trek movie.

Oh yeah, cerebral STAR TREK about ideas and ideals will not work in the present or future of the movie franchise.

Sigh

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I would love if the makers of STAR TREK movies could adapt the Roddenberry script for THE GOD THING into a future Trek movie.

Oh yeah, cerebral STAR TREK about ideas and ideals will not work in the present or future of the movie franchise.

Sigh

What was Roddenberry's maddening obsession with the "thing" suffix?   I was re-watching some TNG S1 last night, and there it was again: "Vicious 'animal-things.'" And in "Justice" we hear Data say "a God thing."   In "Lonely Among Us" the fused Picard/energy-being says "Enterprise-thing."  

Even McCoy in TMP says, "Why is any object we don't understand always called a 'thing'?"  

No.   No more things, please.   :P

Besides, an alien machine appearing as Jesus in a ST movie (!) would never, ever, ever get the green light today; especially not in the current climate.   Religion is too sensitive a subject these days; especially with people suicide-bombing themselves (and others) over, as Q would put it, "silly quarrels over tribal god images." 

That said, I wish Pocket books would've published the novelization they were (once) planning.  Susan Sackett, Walter Koenig and Fred Branson were all supposedly involved with adapting Roddenberry's script as a book, but Pocket Books got cold feet.   I think the fans could better digest such a story in a novel than a movie.  As a movie, no studio executive in their right mind would touch it.  

But the real issue isn't that it'd be 'too cerebral'; but rather needlessly provocative (for some, not myself). 

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I love the idea. The plots sounds like pure Gene Roddenberry.

STAR TREK + social religious controversy = big box office

LOL

Gus

Yeah, because STV was such a runaway success, right? :laugh:

And let's not forget that remake of "Ben-Hur".... :giggle:

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I love the idea. The plots sounds like pure Gene Roddenberry.

STAR TREK + social religious controversy = big box office

LOL

Gus

Yeah, because STV was such a runaway success, right? :laugh:

And let's not forget that remake of "Ben-Hur".... :giggle:

Ben-Hur was a success, sir. You simply have to change your metric. It would have been a success had it aired on The Hallmark Channel instead.

Cineplexes, not so much.  

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I love the idea. The plots sounds like pure Gene Roddenberry.

STAR TREK + social religious controversy = big box office

LOL

Gus

Yeah, because STV was such a runaway success, right? :laugh:

And let's not forget that remake of "Ben-Hur".... :giggle:

Ben-Hur was a success, sir. You simply have to change your metric. It would have been a success had it aired on The Hallmark Channel instead.

^
giphy.gif :P

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kenman   

I've never felt the God Thing would've been all that great a movie really.  Elements of it seem similar to Final Frontier and The Motion Picture...and while I will admit that TMP is lacking in some warmth...it feels like the best ideas made it into TMP, while the lamest ideas made it into TFF. 

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