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Sim

Classical Music

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Sim   

These days, I'm very much into classical music.

I don't play an instrument myself, so I can't say I have an educated ear for classical music, but I'm familiar with listening to it, as I grew up with it (my parents are passionate classical music listeners). So it's not quite the case for me that this music is an "acquired taste" as some say, but there are many pieces I know from early childhood on.

For example, my parents often played Bach's "Christmas Oratorio" around Christmas time, or Vivaldi's "Four Seasons" when they prepared a special dinner. My mother told me the story behind Beethoven's 6th symphony when playing it, when I was a kid. There are several other pieces I remember well, which remained stuck in my memory, such as Bach's "Brandenburg Concertos" and "Goldberg Variations", some pieces by Mozart such as "Eine kleine Nachmusik", Dvorak's "Slavonic Dances", Saint-Saens' "Carnival of Animals" and "Danse Macabre" (yuck! dancing skeletons!!! ;) ), or Debussy's "Le Mer" or Grieg's "Peer Gynt Suite". And of course, it is very hard to forget the opening of Beethoven's 5th symphony, or the 4th movement of the 9th, when you've heard it once.

Some nights, when I couldn't fall asleep (which happened rather often when I was between 8 and 18 years old), I'd listen to a classical music channel on the radio. There I picked up some more, but don't remember the names of the pieces well. I remember that "new music" impressed me, such as Bartok or Stravinsky.

Since I am a notorious collector, I felt I have to build a collection of classical music as well. And I was/am curious about learning more about it. So I bought a great book that's fun to read, an introduction to classical music, with short portrays of the lifes and most important works of 50 composers. I like to approach this music not randomly, but rather read a bit about it when listening to it. :)

A couple of years ago, I already bought very cheap "complete editions" with hundreds of CDs by Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. They're released by a Dutch label, and allegedly, the quality of the recordings is not all that bad (as "experts" told me is often the case when it comes to very cheap releases). Most of the recordings are by decent performers, just older, so the licensing costs are not very high -- for example, the collection includes a complete set of all piano works by Beethoven, played by top pianist Alfred Brendel in the 1960s. Also, many records from former East German state-owned labels are included, which are said to be pretty decent, but there is not much demand for them anymore. By now, I've listened to all these CDs at least once, my favorites even much more often.

Since I had some money left this month, I endulged in a buying rush and bought more classical music CDs. My idea was to go beyond Bach, Mozart and Beethoven, since there is so much more to discover.

So I bought some recordings by Haydn, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Wagner, Richard Strauss, Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, and with special curiosity, several CDs with Bartok's music and a 22 CD collection of the works of Igor Stravinsky. Still waiting for Ligeti's "Atmospheres" and Holst's "The Planets" to arrive. :)

(Nod to Sehlat: Thanks for pointing me to Ligeti and Bartok!)

So far, I can say that I recognized several melodies I had heard before, for example from Schubert's 8th symphony, Schumann's 3rd, or Brahm's 1st. And of course a lot by Tchaikovsky. Bartok's violin pieces are eery! :D

What about you? Anybody here into classical music, or even playing yourself? Which are your favorite pieces? :)

Edited by Sim

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(Nod to Sehlat: Thanks for pointing me to Ligeti and Bartok!)

You're very welcome!

And to answer you Q? I am (obviously) very much a fan of classical music (I like all kinds of music really, but classical is a favorite genre...).

My favorite composers would be (in no particular order); Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, Borodin, Shostakovich, Holst, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi and Handel. There are many others, but those are the ones who come to mind right off...

Favorite pieces? Let me try (it's early in the morning here...)

Mozart: His requiem Mass, Der Zauberflote, Marriage of Figaro, Jupiter Symphony, Piano Concerto # 21 in C major, Concerto for Flutes and Harps (one of the most beautiful pieces of music I've ever heard in my entire life!) and many more.

Bach: Ode to Joy (played at my wedding on harp!), Toccata and Fugue in D minor (a Halloween staple in my house...scares the crap out of the neighborhood kids!), and Minuet in G minor (a sweet ditty).

Beethoven: 9th Symphony, Fur Elise (again, a gorgeous piece of music), 5th Symphony and many, many more...

Borodin: Polovtsian Dances No. 8 (aka, the theme of "Stranger in Paradise"). I can listen to this one repeated on a loop... I just love it!

Shostakovich: Symphony No 11 'The Year 1905'; I fell in love with this one when I was a kid and bought the cassette soundtrack to the TV series, "Cosmos"; I eventually bought the full version and have loved it ever since.

Ligeti: "Requiem" "Atmospheres" "Lux Aeterna" (thank YOU, Stanley Kubrick; for making "2001: A Space Odyssey"...).

Richard Strauss: "Also Sprach Zarathustra" (once again, thank you Kubrick; for not only making my favorite movie, but turning me on to some of my [future] favorite music...)

Johann Strauss II: "Blue Danube" (Best... Waltz... EVER).

Holst: "The Planets" (esp. love his Mars, Venus and Jupiter pieces! Mercury is OK, too...).

Vivaldi: "The Four Seasons" (need I say more?)

Tchaikovsky: "Sleeping Beauty Suite," "Nutcracker" (full version), "Swan Lake" (the perfect embodiment of Slavic ennui).

Handel: "Messiah" (a staple in our house at Christmas; brings tears to my wife's eyes).

There are SO MANY MORE, but those are just the highlights. My CD collection (and iTunes collection) is beyond insane at this point.

I can think of other favorite selections as soon as I shake the cobwebs and dust from my aged, atrophied brain...

I didn't have the best relationship with my mother (far from it, sadly), but I did appreciate her turning me on to classical music when I was little. It has enriched my life tremendously.

Great thread topic, Sim! :biggrin:

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Oh myyyy! I have to come back to this one. Just wanted to add that 2001 is my #1 movie of all time and the music selection was revolutionary to my ears. Strangely, my #2 movie is Harold and Maude so that kind of breaks the pattern.

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Oh myyyy! I have to come back to this one. Just wanted to add that 2001 is my #1 movie of all time and the music selection was revolutionary to my ears. Strangely, my #2 movie is Harold and Maude so that kind of breaks the pattern.

"2001" is my all-time favorite science fiction movie too! I was too young to remember it in its initial release (finally; something I'm too young for! :giggle: ), but I had the soundtrack album (with its big gatefold jacket) and later saw it on a revival screening in L.A. when I was 16. It blew my mind. At that moment, I understood what all they hype was about. When I was 10, "Star Wars" was the movie that changed my life, but "2001" was a genuine consciousness-expanding experience (and without drugs; the best kind! :biggrin: ).

And I love "Harold and Maude" as well; one of the best love stories ever committed to film IMHO. And I'm a huge fan of Cat Stevens...

But back on topic, another classical piece I really love is Mozart's Piano Concerto # 25. It begins so deceptively simple and breezy, and becomes powerful and magnificent.

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Sim   

(Nod to Sehlat: Thanks for pointing me to Ligeti and Bartok!)

You're very welcome!

And to answer you Q? I am (obviously) very much a fan of classical music (I like all kinds of music really, but classical is a favorite genre...).

(...)

Great thread topic, Sim! :biggrin:

Thanks, Sehlat ... I've really been into classical music all the time the past three weeks or so ... listening all the new (and some old) stuff in my collection. :)

My interest in music rests on three legs: Classical, jazz and rock (mostly classical rock, especially from the 70s and 90s, but also a little metal and punk here and there). So far, other genres (such as folk, most pop, hiphop/rap or electronic dance/techno) have not yet managed to catch my interest. Of course there are really great, catchy pop songs now and then (and I have several Michael Jackson discs ;) ), but it's not in the focus of my collector's passion. ;)

Since you've taken the effort of listing some of your favorites, I want to add my thoughts. I'll take your quotes (inverted) and then add a few ideas. :)

Mozart: His requiem Mass, Der Zauberflote, Marriage of Figaro, Jupiter Symphony, Piano Concerto # 21 in C major, Concerto for Flutes and Harps (one of the most beautiful pieces of music I've ever heard in my entire life!) and many more.

I've listened to the Requiem, Die Zauberflöte, some of his symphonies and piano concertos again in the past weeks. I like that Mozart is so mellow most of the time, very "good mood" music. :) Especially his "Kleine Nachtmusik" is such an earworm ... I caught myself humming it a lot recently, lol. When falling asleep, I sometimes switch on his divertimenti and serenades... I guess they're more like "harmless entertainment", but really amazing for bedtime, IMO.

Except for "Die Zauberflöte", I've not really looked deeper into his operas... I still have to get used to vocal classical music in general. So far, I'm focusing more on instrumental music. Also, I feel I'm missing something when I listen to it without following the story (for me, it's accoustically very hard to understand the lyrics when sung, and I've not yet found the patience reading it up.

Have to keep in mind your words on the flute and harp concerto! :)

Bach: Ode to Joy (played at my wedding on harp!), Toccata and Fugue in D minor (a Halloween staple in my house...scares the crap out of the neighborhood kids!), and Minuet in G minor (a sweet ditty).

Wasn't the Ode to Joy by Beethoven, or did Bach write one too? Anyway, a beautiful piece. But I always have to think of a parody made by an Austrian comedian, of which the lyrics go like "I hate all people, I want to punch them in the face", lol. ;)

I can imagine your neighborhood kids are scared when they hear Toccata and Fugue in D minor... maybe other keyboard pieces by Bach, but played by an old harpsichord rather than a modern piano are great for Halloween too! :D

If I have to name one favorite composer, it would be Bach. I just love his music ... and like no one else, IMO, he manages to make music that fits every mood. No matter if I'm stressed, in a good or bad mood, sad or agitated -- all I have to do is switching on the "Goldberg Variations", for example, and I feel much better again (for example Glenn Gould's beautiful interpretation). :)

They play the Brandenburg Concertos very often in halls here around Berlin, simply because Berliners (and the Brandenburgers in the state around Berlin) are very proud Bach wrote that music for our region (or then, king). Another favorite of mine is the 3rd concerto suite with the famous "Air" in the 2nd movement. Just beautiful.

Can't say I know anything about music theory, but I also love the rhythm in Bach's baroque music (perhaps it comes with that counterpoint-stuff). So I also listen to his keyboard works on harpsicord regularly, rather than on a piano, because the rhythm has almost an electronic-techno quality to it, which makes the rhythm very visible. ;)

Beethoven: 9th Symphony, Fur Elise (again, a gorgeous piece of music), 5th Symphony and many, many more...

Borodin: Polovtsian Dances No. 8 (aka, the theme of "Stranger in Paradise"). I can listen to this one repeated on a loop... I just love it!

Shostakovich: Symphony No 11 'The Year 1905'; I fell in love with this one when I was a kid and bought the cassette soundtrack to the TV series, "Cosmos"; I eventually bought the full version and have loved it ever since.

No need to say more on Beethoven's symphonies ... except maybe that I have a weak spot for the often ignored 6th symphony. It's a favorite of my mother's, and she'd often play it when I was a kid. She then told me the "story" the music is telling, like people going on a picknick, then a storm comes and so on. Whenever I listen to it, I'm 3 years old again. ;)

I've not yet consciously listened to Borodon and Shostakovich ... but I'm curious, so I guess I should put it on my list. As for Russian composers, I also like the "Sheherazade" by Rimsky-Korsakov and, vastly different music, am fond of Stravinsky. I find the latter's often disharmonic music extremely interesting, and feel the opposite effect of what many people often say (they find it hard to access because of the disharmony) -- I find it much easier accessible than, say, the classicism of Beethoven or Haydn, because it resembles modern film music a lot.

Ligeti: "Requiem" "Atmospheres" "Lux Aeterna" (thank YOU, Stanley Kubrick; for making "2001: A Space Odyssey"...).

Thanks to your recommendation, I bought a CD with all the named pieces on it ... wow. That is eery stuff. And I had no idea you can make music without single tones. This idea is just fascinating. But it absolutely works for me ... this music transports tension, and even evokes images of horror in me (like long, stretched limbs and faces beyond recognition ... as if notes were body parts). And I absolutely have to watch "2001" again ...

Richard Strauss: "Also Sprach Zarathustra" (once again, thank you Kubrick; for not only making my favorite movie, but turning me on to some of my [future] favorite music...)

Johann Strauss II: "Blue Danube" (Best... Waltz... EVER).

Holst: "The Planets" (esp. love his Mars, Venus and Jupiter pieces! Mercury is OK, too...).

Okay, there are three Strauss'es ... Johann Sr. and Jr, and then Richard. Do you know if Richard is related to the Johanns?

Anyway, Richard's "tone poems" are great. I happened to learn to know "Zarathustra" thanks to 2001 as well. Amazing piece... when I have to think of a grave, bombastic piece, that one comes to my mind. :) Funny thing I read about another piece by R. Strauss, "Life of a Hero": He wrote it about himself! LOL! Now if he didn't have an ego ...

And I also had the chance to listen to Holst's "Planets" for the first time (and the second, and third ;) ). IMO, it resembles film music a lot, and it's funny to see how much Eidelmann's opening of Star Trek VI is inspired by Holst's "Mars". I just read somewhere that Meyer initially planned to use "The Planets" in ST:VI... do you know why he didn't do it after all, in the end?

My first impression favorites are Mars and Jupiter, too ... but as a matter of experience, I'll most likely cherish the less obvious pieces the more I listen to them again. :)

Vivaldi: "The Four Seasons" (need I say more?)

Nope. ;)

Tchaikovsky: "Sleeping Beauty Suite," "Nutcracker" (full version), "Swan Lake" (the perfect embodiment of Slavic ennui).

I love his ballets too. Nutcracker is great for Christmas, IMO ... when my daughter is a little older, I hope it's one of the pieces I can get her into (maybe along with the story told in a movie... isn't there a Disney version of it?). Maybe it's a matter of my generation, but when I hear some pieces from "Nutcracker" or "Swan Lake", I can't help but seeing Tetris blocks falling when I close the eyes, because they played these themes in an 8-bit version on Nintendo and Game Boy ... lol. ;)

Tchaikovsky's first piano concerto impressed me a lot, as well. IIRC, they used its openening for a beer commercial in the 90s here... so I have to think of the X-Files. Because back then, they often showed that commercial during the X-Files' ad breaks. Funny how music and memory works.

The "Ouverture 1812" is another piece I remember very well. It was the first classical piece our teachers played in music class in my high school. I guess his plan was to break two flies with one wheel, getting us into an easily accessible piece, and then also tell us something about programmatic music (like the French and Russian hymns fighting a musical battle and so on) ...

Handel: "Messiah" (a staple in our house at Christmas; brings tears to my wife's eyes).

That's one work I'm *extremely* curious about. It's waiting on my shelf, but I haven't listened to it yet (at least not consciously -- well possible I caught some of it before somewhere). But I read some about it, and it seems it's really an "important" work, so it's definitely something I should listen to with attention.

I didn't have the best relationship with my mother (far from it, sadly), but I did appreciate her turning me on to classical music when I was little. It has enriched my life tremendously.

I'm very glad my parents got me into classical music as well, even sent me to a children music school for a year when I was 4 or so (but then, didn't insist when I didn't feel like learning an instrument ... which I now regret). My relation to my parents is okay, although I have mixed feelings towards my mother ... she's a very difficult person, and it often wasn't easy with her when I was a kid. So I can't say our relation is without burdens. But on the bottom line, we're getting along well, and I can absolutely say my parents are acting out of best intentions towards me.

Other composers I discovered: I like Hindemith very much on first glance (I've bought several CDs and listened to them at least once). I like how he's very dissonant too, but much "lighter" than the heavy, disturbing Stravinsky. It seems that Hindemith creates more contrast between light melody on one side, and dissonant tones on the other. Also, he sounds a lot like modern film music. :)

When taking a closer look on Schubert, Mendelssohn and Schumann, I found that I have a slight preference for Mendelssohn. I can't quite put my finger on it, but something about his music just talks to me a tiny bit more than the music of the other too. Although I have to say that Schumann's piano pieces are just wonderful too.

And I found I like Dvorak's slightly "ethnic" sounds (for the lack of a better term ... "folk" doesn't quite fit, because I read people can't decide if these influences are more Bohemian or even native American ;) ). That adds an interesting flavor. :)

Another work I enjoy a lot is Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana". A fascinating mix of very old and very new ... and I have fond memories of it: My best high school buddy played it sometimes, especially when we were going to start role playing (pen-and-paper).

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Wasn't the Ode to Joy by Beethoven, or did Bach write one too?

Bach wrote one too (entirely unrelated). A common mistake.

Die Zauberflöte

Die Zauberlfote, not Der. Ja, danke!

I knew I screwed that one up. It takes a real German... ;)

Handel: "Messiah" (a staple in our house at Christmas; brings tears to my wife's eyes).

That's one work I'm *extremely* curious about. It's waiting on my shelf, but I haven't listened to it yet (at least not consciously -- well possible I caught some of it before somewhere). But I read some about it, and it seems it's really an "important" work, so it's definitely something I should listen to with attention.

Oh, I'm sure you've heard it around Christmas (voluntarily or not... :laugh: ). It is beautiful, though...

The "Ouverture 1812" is another piece I remember very well. It was the first classical piece our teachers played in music class in my high school.

My father used to love that one (as did I). He really loved the repeated and heroic use of the French anthem in it as well (my dad was born in France).

Okay, there are three Strauss'es ... Johann Sr. and Jr, and then Richard. Do you know if Richard is related to the Johanns?

I honestly don't think so.

And I've not read anything online that directly traces a bloodline between them.

Seems a bit of a coincidence, but then again, that is also the name of the original manufacturer of blue jeans in the United States, too! :laugh:

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Sim   

Focusing a bit more on late romanticism. Liszt, Mahler, R. Strauss, Bruckner, even Wagner. I'm not a big fan of operas, but I've started the project of reading the libretto of Wagner's "Ring of the Nibelung" while listening to it. Now I've even bought a Blu Ray of it and watch it again after having read/listened only first. I've just finished the first act of the second opera in the cycle, "The Valkyrie".

With all that Germanic mythology and its pathos, it maybe even has some resemblence to modern fantasy. I wonder about the relation of Wagner's "Ring" and Tolkien, for example. I guess these operas were a similar event for people back then as "Star Wars" or the "Lord of the Rings" movies were/are these days. ;)

Wagner is a difficult figure in today's Germany, because of his strict anti-Semitism and because the Nazis didn't miss any opportunity to use/abuse his music (for example, Wagner sounds were played in the German propaganda radio during WW2, whenever there was a report about a victory). That's why many Germans today seem to hate Wagner and feel it's "music to invade Poland to".

But maybe, since even Jewish artists such as Daniel Barenboim are conducting Wagner operas, it's not too soon to have a fair, objective view on his work again, context-warts and all.

Edited by Sim

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Focusing a bit more on late romanticism. Liszt, Mahler, R. Strauss, Bruckner, even Wagner. I'm not a big fan of operas, but I've started the project of reading the libretto of Wagner's "Ring of the Nibelung" while listening to it. Now I've even bought a Blu Ray of it and watch it again after having read/listened only first. I've just finished the first act of the second opera in the cycle, "The Valkyrie".

With all that Germanic mythology and its pathos, it maybe even has some resemblence to modern fantasy. I wonder about the relation of Wagner's "Ring" and Tolkien, for example. I guess these operas were a similar event for people back then as "Star Wars" or the "Lord of the Rings" movies were/are these days. ;)

Wagner is a difficult figure in today's Germany, because of his strict anti-Semitism and because the Nazis didn't miss any opportunity to use/abuse his music (for example, Wagner sounds were played in the German propaganda radio during WW2, whenever there was a report about a victory). That's why many Germans today seem to hate Wagner and feel it's "music to invade Poland to".

But maybe, since even Jewish artists such as Daniel Barenboim are conducting Wagner operas, it's not too soon to have a fair, objective view on his work again, context-warts and all.

It's a shame that the art can't be magically separated from the artist somehow.

While Wagner is not necessarily my favorite composer (he's so... Wagnerian. LOL), I think he was a gifted composer (despite any anti-Semitic feelings or the fact that he was Hitler's favorite composer).

There are many times when one has to disassociate the art from the artist:

* Frank Lloyd Wright was a misogynistic prick... but he also started an architectural revolution. There's a reason some of his buildings still hold up today as examples of progressive, forward-thinking 'futuristic' architecture.

* Tom Cruise is downright obnoxious with his Scientology dogma. But he's also a great actor and has made some terrific movies ("Risky Business" "Born on the 4th of July" etc).

* And let's not even get into Bill Cosby right now (as a lifelong Cosby fan since childhood, my heart is broken over this particular scandal...).

So can Wagner ever be appreciated on strictly the merits of his music, despite its negative use ("Apocalypse Now", for one) and its anti-Semitic vibe? Are those things just too difficult to reconcile? I say it all depends on the listener.

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Sim   

Focusing a bit more on late romanticism. Liszt, Mahler, R. Strauss, Bruckner, even Wagner. I'm not a big fan of operas, but I've started the project of reading the libretto of Wagner's "Ring of the Nibelung" while listening to it. Now I've even bought a Blu Ray of it and watch it again after having read/listened only first. I've just finished the first act of the second opera in the cycle, "The Valkyrie".

With all that Germanic mythology and its pathos, it maybe even has some resemblence to modern fantasy. I wonder about the relation of Wagner's "Ring" and Tolkien, for example. I guess these operas were a similar event for people back then as "Star Wars" or the "Lord of the Rings" movies were/are these days. ;)

Wagner is a difficult figure in today's Germany, because of his strict anti-Semitism and because the Nazis didn't miss any opportunity to use/abuse his music (for example, Wagner sounds were played in the German propaganda radio during WW2, whenever there was a report about a victory). That's why many Germans today seem to hate Wagner and feel it's "music to invade Poland to".

But maybe, since even Jewish artists such as Daniel Barenboim are conducting Wagner operas, it's not too soon to have a fair, objective view on his work again, context-warts and all.

It's a shame that the art can't be magically separated from the artist somehow.

While Wagner is not necessarily my favorite composer (he's so... Wagnerian. LOL), I think he was a gifted composer (despite any anti-Semitic feelings or the fact that he was Hitler's favorite composer).

There are many times when one has to disassociate the art from the artist:

* Frank Lloyd Wright was a misogynistic prick... but he also started an architectural revolution. There's a reason some of his buildings still hold up today as examples of progressive, forward-thinking 'futuristic' architecture.

* Tom Cruise is downright obnoxious with his Scientology dogma. But he's also a great actor and has made some terrific movies ("Risky Business" "Born on the 4th of July" etc).

* And let's not even get into Bill Cosby right now (as a lifelong Cosby fan since childhood, my heart is broken over this particular scandal...).

So can Wagner ever be appreciated on strictly the merits of his music, despite its negative use ("Apocalypse Now", for one) and its anti-Semitic vibe? Are those things just too difficult to reconcile? I say it all depends on the listener.

Another example would be Roman Polanski. I just love many of his movies, "The Tenant" is perhaps even on my all-time top 5 list. But I guess I wouldn't let him anywhere near my daughter. ;)

As for Wagner, I enjoy the Ring so far. But just like for you, he certainly isn't my favorite composer, although obviously pretty good. So far, I prefer Mahler's symphonies for "bombastic" classical sound.

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Sim   

After I had listened to a lot "future music" of the (late) romantics, I'm now focusing a little more on 20th century music, including the "weird" stuff:

Stravinsky and Bartok are great, IMO. Though Stravinsky apparently went through different phases. Some of his works sound a lot more dissonant-20th century-ish than others. Just listened to "Pulcinella", which sounds rather classic 19th-century-like, but then "Scènes du Ballet" were a lot more than I remembered him, with the dissonances and so on.

I like Hindemith. He's soft and mild on one side, almost Bach-Mozart-like, but then dissonant at the same time. No idea how he makes that, but I find it intriguing.

With Schoenberg, it becomes really weird. His "atonal" and then twelve-tone music may be many things, very interesting for example, but it is definitely not beautiful. This moment, I'm just listening to his vocal work "Pierrot Lunaire".

Sehlat, when you find Ligeti interesting, maybe you like Stockhausen as well? He's similarly experimentalist, as far as I can tell. Yesterday, I listened to his works "Gruppen" and "Punkte". I can't say I "understand" his music, but it was interesting trying to find patterns in these seemingless random noises made by the orchestra. I should read about his work to learn about the idea behind it.

With all this experimentation going on in post-WW2 "classical" music, I wonder if classical music is dead.

In the sense that the time when new classical music was able to find broad audiences is over forever. In the 19th century, *every* European who could afford it listened to and loved romantic music, it had broad mass appeal. And even today, 18th and 19th century classical music has still a certain mass appeal -- there are many fans and people passionate about that music, concerts and operas are still being played, and while it's perhaps no longer the dominant kind of music, it's still rather strong and not forgotten.

But what about the 20th century experimentalist composers, especially post-WW2? Will in 100 years some of them still be remembered in the same league as Wagner, Tchaikovsky or at least Bruckner or Hindemith? Or will other genres of music be considered "classical early 21st century music" then, such as film music, musicals and so on?

Are jazz, rock and pop the true heirs of Western music, instead of the "classical experimentalists"? Or film music?

When I have enough money left again, perhaps I should focus a little more on film music. There is awesome stuff on that field, IMO.

Edited by Sim

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Sehlat, when you find Ligeti interesting, maybe you like Stockhausen as well? He's similarly experimentalist, as far as I can tell. Yesterday, I listened to his works "Gruppen" and "Punkte". I can't say I "understand" his music, but it was interesting trying to find patterns in these seemingless random noises made by the orchestra. I should read about his work to learn about the idea behind it.

You got me curious. I might have to check out Stockhausen's works; I like experimental composers now and then (like Ligeti).

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Sim   

Sehlat, when you find Ligeti interesting, maybe you like Stockhausen as well? He's similarly experimentalist, as far as I can tell. Yesterday, I listened to his works "Gruppen" and "Punkte". I can't say I "understand" his music, but it was interesting trying to find patterns in these seemingless random noises made by the orchestra. I should read about his work to learn about the idea behind it.

You got me curious. I might have to check out Stockhausen's works; I like experimental composers now and then (like Ligeti).

I ordered two 10-CD box sets, compilations with the works of contemporary, more and less known "classical" composers, a mix of more established contemporary composers and newcomers. Just had to do that, because I want to learn a few things about the state of new classical music today. Let's see if I can find something fascinating.

If you're interested, I'm going to let you know my thoughts.

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I don't know much about classical music, but I've been trying to listen to more of it recently.

I do remember The Planets, by Holst, which was neat. I also remember listening to some of Chopin's work and Danse Macabre. I recall hearing a bit of Swan Lake, which was lovely. I also listened to the first part of the Moonlight Sonata recently, which was very nice indeed.

On another note, apparently Erik Satie's work plays in a TNG episode -- Picard is listening to it while waiting for the ship to self-destruct. I must watch that scene at some point...

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