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Admiral Harmon

The Jedi/Palpatine Conspiracy

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For over a 25,000 years the Jedi Order was in exsistance. For over a thousand years, they were the Guardians of the Old Republic. Within ten years though, a single Sith under the name of Palpatine masterminded the downfall of the Republic and the rise of a Sith empire which he named the Galactic Empire. Ten years, two wars, millions of troops on either-side, and his mastery of the Force kept the Jedi too busy to keep an eye on him and his true nature, until it was far too late to stop him.

But, what if the rise of Palpatine was actually a conspiracy? What if key members of the Jedi High Council had all along wanted power? What if they and Palpatine had been in league to topple the Republic, which had grown weak and power was for the taking?

Balderdash, is what the Star Wars fan would say. We saw Operation Knightfall. We saw Order 66. We saw the Jedi fight to keep back Palpatine! Or...did we?

A Conspiracy Born

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Darth Sidious and his apprentice Darth Maul hid in the underworld, biding their time for power. They hid on Coruscant, far away from the Jedi Temple.

Why then would Palpatine become such a prominent figure? Why would he risk being exposed by the Jedi Order? Palpatine is like Moriarty. Best not exposed for what he is by hiding in the shadows and having others do his dirty work. Of course, one could argue, the best hiding place is in plain sight. But, why would a man with galactic ambitions, risk the wrath of a Jedi Order who could easily have stopped him at any point in time if they had known he was there?

That is of course accepting they were too blind to see the obvious. That the Jedi High Council, the most powerful users of the Jedi Order couldn't see it. We have people like Saess Tinn who are telepathic. Mace Windu who was able to see what is called shatter points (able to see everything that holds one together). Not to mention Yoda, who was over 800 years old, and the most powerful user of the Force and outmatched even Sidious during their battle (why he fled is up for debate).

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The Senate had by this time proved corrupt and no longer willing to serve it's purpose as doers of the public good. Count Dukoo told Obi-wan that Qui-Gon Jinn knew all about the corruption in the Senate. The Jedi are about justice. By 23 BBY (Before Battle of Yavin) the Republic had become rotten and weak. The need was there for strong leadership.

Who better to lead than the Jedi Council. Of course, the Jedi would never have been approved for a take over by the public good. Unless.....they were seen as saviors. Or, better yet, working behind the scenes, the real power behind the throne. What better person than Palpatine who was already showing signs of ambition?

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I mean, if they could see through the Chosen One, and even a Padawan could sense the darkness on Coruscant far away on Naboo, surely the Jedi could have seen Palpatine and his Sith ways while in the same room.

What is the best way to pull off the ultimate power play? 1. You need a public face that no one suspected. Palpatine fits the bill. 2. You need to divert attention away from what you are doing. That could be arraigned. 3. The smaller the Conspiracy, the more likely it is to succeed.

A Sith? Surely you must be joking.

In 23 ABY, the blockade of Naboo begins. This throws the Senate into turmoil. Chancellor Valorum asked the Jedi Council for ambassadors to help resolve the situation. Who did they send? Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi. Negotiations quickly went south, and after rescuing Amidala from certain death, get stranded on Tatooine. The Invasion of Naboo commenced, the already scared Senate becomes focused entirely on this issue. It doesn't help that Sidious uses his pawns in the Trade Federation go beyond their normal routine and promises he'll keep them bogged down in procedure. Palpatine certainly does this.

There, they meet Anakin Skywalker, the Chosen One. They also meet up with this guy, Darth Maul.

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Qui-Gon reports to the Council of his existence, and while Ki-Adi-Mundi expressed surprise at this revelation, what is the reaction of Mace Windu and Yoda?

Mace Windu: "I do not believe the Sith could return without our knowing." Yoda: "Ah, Hard to see, the Dark Side is." Neither act as they should have acted. At the least they should have acted more concerned. But both acted as if they were unconcerned by this report. However, when Qui-Gon reports his belief that he has found the Chosen One, then they show real surprise.

That same scene, as Obi-wan and his master leaves the Council Chambers, not the look between the two. Was it really them looking back and forth in concern by what they had learned? Or was it really annoyance at realizing they hadn't sold their reactions to the news of a possible Sith more convincingly? When they next see Qui-Gon, they seem urgent that Qui-Gon go and find out about this Sith. Note however, that their reaction is more worried now then when they were told.

Was it simply they had thought about it and got concerned by the possible implications? Or were they simply trying to sell it better?

Also note this. If they really were concerned it might be a Sith, why send a disgruntled Jedi Master who was already defying Council rulings and his padawan? Or, were they seeing an opportunity to get rid of what might have been a hindrance to their rise to power. Surely a full-blown SIth would have warranted at least a junior member of the Jedi Council going to check this out. But no, they send the two most likely to fail. And even if one or both survived, considering at least the Master's track record, who'd believe them?

Next: The Drama of a Queen, or how the Senator Stole the Spotlight

Edited by Admiral Harmon

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For over a 25,000 years the Jedi Order was in exsistance. For over a thousand years, they were the Guardians of the Old Republic.

This is something the prequels always screw up. Ben's line in "A New Hope" was actually, "For over a thousand generations, the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic." Not 1,000 years. 1,000 generations. BIG difference. Ever since their existence, they were guardians of the Old Republic. It's not as if they sat around for 24,000 years figuring out what to do.

As for the rest? I don't take the prequels seriously enough to explore in this kind of detail. They contradict the original trilogy so much, it's hard to believe that they were written (and directed) by the same guy who knocked the original Star Wars out of the ballpark in 1977. It's like he lost the recipe for making a good SW movie.

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Interesting theory - but I'm not sure I agree. Are you implying Mace Windu and Yoda were involved with helping Palpatine? If so - why did both of them try to kill him in Episode 3? Was "Order 66" not part of the plan and it angered them he did that?

Plus - there are scenes with just Yoda and Mace talking to each other expressing their worry about the future with the cloud of the Dark Side over them. Why have conversations like that? Who are they fooling?

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Interesting theory - but I'm not sure I agree. Are you implying Mace Windu and Yoda were involved with helping Palpatine? If so - why did both of them try to kill him in Episode 3? Was "Order 66" not part of the plan and it angered them he did that?

Plus - there are scenes with just Yoda and Mace talking to each other expressing their worry about the future with the cloud of the Dark Side over them. Why have conversations like that? Who are they fooling?

Windu and Yoda? Yes. As for how deep their involvement was I'll address that later. And the "attempts" on Palpatine's life go hand-in-hand.

As for the rest? I don't take the prequels seriously enough to explore in this kind of detail. They contradict the original trilogy so much, it's hard to believe that they were written (and directed) by the same guy who knocked the original Star Wars out of the ballpark in 1977. It's like he lost the recipe for making a good SW movie.

Well, some people can only get the magic once or twice.

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The Drama of a Queen, or how the Senator Stole the Spotlight

Perhaps the bizarrest thing about the rise of Palpatine to power was just how quickly he gained power to the Chancellory. Queen Amidala, steps into his office, listens to his speech. When Palpatine suggest that their only course might be outing Chancellor Valorum, she adamently says no. But immediately changes her mind about it in the Senate Chamber. Why, one might ask, was the Queen of Naboo so receptive to the urging of Senator Palpatine?

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First we must understand why Naboo was targeted for the blockade and subsequent invasion. Sure, Naboo said no to the trading boycott by the Trade Federation, which was in their right. But, the invasion was completely illegal, unless a treaty was signed. Any planet and I mean any planet could have been targeted by the conspiracy. But, Naboo was a unique case. The Jedi and Sith needed a planet that was pacifist. Alderaan would have been just as good a planet for this.

But Naboo had a military, in fact, two militaries. A peaceful planet with two small militaries against the giant Trade Federation droid armies. The Goliath and David scenario was too perfect to pass up. The underdogs versus the big dog. People are drawn like moths to the flame when it comes to such battles.

Also, Queen Amidala was very young. The Queen of Alderaan, for example, was always a Queen for life. Amidala on the other hand was in the unique position of being elected to the office by her people. She was young, and naive. She was desperate for approval otherwise she'd go the way of her predecessor who was assassinated by the people, and would do absolutely anything to avoid such a fate. She would do absolutely anything, even if it meant ousting the Chancellor (which left power vacant for a man of Palpatine's political skills) or ending unofficial differences between two unapologetic races, In fact, she was so desperate that we see that as soon as Valorum started listening to other people and trying to find a middle ground, Palpatine was able to get her to cause the entire Senate to vote against him.

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With Naboo under attack, Palpatine was sure to win "on the sympathy vote". That was critical to getting Palpatine where the conspiracy needed him: on top.

The Great Patsy, The Chosen One

The Jedi members of the conspiracy had planned on Amidala to be there and give them the opening to place their man in charge. They knew about Sidious' apprentice Darth Maul and while those not in the loop (like Ki-Adi-Mundi and Qui-Gon) were scared of the implications, they were by no means surprised by it, since they expected it. The one thing neither side had counted for was Anakin Skywalker.

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Born to a family destined for slavery, Anakin knew hardships. When he meet Qui-Gon Jinn, he assumed that his fate was simply to escape slavery and become a Jedi. His arrival at first made the Council wary, even more so members of the Conspiracy. How would the Chosen One upset the plans? While most members of the Council could have accepted him easily, his age was a factor that could not be wished away. What if this nine year old could see into their plans? Most children in the order arrived at six months, where they could be easily manipulated by whomever were the Council. Anakin however knew right and wrong and was a wild card.

So concerned were Mace Windu and Yoda, who needed everything to work perfectly for their plans of control to happen, they passed judgement to keep him out of the order. However, during the Battle of Naboo, they'd have had time to talk to Palpatine about this, who would have been able to propose an idea. What would happen if the Chosen One was indeed the Chosen One? What if this boy ended up being a popular figure (which could easily be arraigned) and he decided to go with the plans? People would follow him without question. And as he'd be growing up in war, war heroes are the ones most readily listened to. Or, just not tell him anything and have him be the Great Patsy, the one which everything fell upon public opinion wise.

Mace Windu would have advocated to the Council that they had been wrong, while Yoda could have shown public opposition to the taking him on. Mace Windu was not old like Yoda, and so would have been more readily listened to, than the old wizened Jedi Master, who simply was out of touch with the times.

So, in the end, the introduction of Anakin Skywalker was the great turning point for any conspiracy. The Chosen One, whichever way he turned, everyone else would follow. They'd only need wait ten years to find which way he'd fall.

Tattos make not the man

The Trade Federation was a dispensable pawn in the grand scheme of things. So was Darth Maul. Anakin Skywalker promised a much stronger face to the rule when Palpatine would finally take over as the public face, so two things could be done at once. The Trade Federation by definition were cowards, and cowards play things carefully. However, in order for the conspiracy to work, the Trade Federation at no given time could gain enough power to truly make a bid for power. And the only way to do that was public humiliation. Again, taking the attention away from the real dangers.

Palpatine realized this, and as such sent Darth Maul to Theed, capitol city of Naboo and the current headquarters of the occupation of Naboo. He was also sent to make sure Nute Gunray and his lackeys didn't leave. The entire command structure had to be humiliated to keep them from getting any funny ideas.

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Part of setting up the fall was forcing the Trade Federation to send away all but one of their control ships. Even a second one would have ensured the Federation victory in the upcoming battle, by being able to keep the droids running even if one was destroyed. Even if one had been destroyed, the Naboo Security Forces would have already been tired and already weakened by casualties. Two would have been out of the question. But having only one automatically negated that victory assuring advantage.

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Second, was the need to send all but a skeleton force to take out the Gungan army. Over sixty thousand droids were deployed against either the gungan army (a mere two thousand man affair) or the underground resistance. Had even twice the number of droids been available in Theed, not even the Jedi could have made it in. As stated previously, the Jedi Council only needed to send their most unreliable assets to face Maul. They needed to ensure that the public could see they were placing Jedi in the field, even if one was no longer young and the other was easy to anger.

Well, Maul died, and so did Qui-Gon Jinn. The latter was a sad loss, but in both cases they were necessary losses in the bid for power. Obi-wan, hot-headed and having been trained by Qui-Gon went to Yoda, and after learning he was to be a Jedi, insisted he would train Anakin, despite being new to a Jedi Knight. The more Yoda said no, the more Obi-wan said yes. Thus, in "defeat" Yoda gave Obi-wan the right to train him, and Obi-wan and indeed the galaxy, was too pleased to see it how easy Yoda and the Council had given up. Now, the pievces were more frimly in place, now all they needed to do was bide their time.

Next: It's a Courscant Thing

Edited by Admiral Harmon

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Sorry, but I'm just not buying it.

The SW prequels simply weren't clever enough to have these kinds of layers-within-layers. Not to mention Founder had a good point; were the private talks between Yoda and Windu just 'puppet theatre' to make everyone else believe they weren't part of a grander conspiracy? This is also forgetting how the 'bright side' of the force is supposed to work (and it would also mean the good/bad sides are the same). Bad as they are, I just accept the prequels at face value; if they were better written, I could accept a deeper meaning or interpretation, but as they are? They're little better than juvenile, Saturday morning cartoons with lots of money.

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Sorry, but I'm just not buying it.

The SW prequels simply weren't clever enough to have these kinds of layers-within-layers. Not to mention Founder had a good point; were the private talks between Yoda and Windu just 'puppet theatre' to make everyone else believe they weren't part of a grander conspiracy? This is also forgetting how the 'bright side' of the force is supposed to work (and it would also mean the good/bad sides are the same). Bad as they are, I just accept the prequels at face value; if they were better written, I could accept a deeper meaning or interpretation, but as they are? They're little better than juvenile, Saturday morning cartoons with lots of money.

Founder does make a good point, but I've also worked that out as well.

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It's a Coruscant Thing

The Conspiracy had succeeded. They had their war hero; the young Anakin Skywalker. Palpatine was the Supreme Chancellor of the Galactic Republic. The Trade Federation, despite having the largest military in known space, had been publicly humiliated, with one of their hierarchy killed. All they whined about Sith was simply a ruse to shuffle off the blame they were recieving for their desperate measures against Naboo.

But, the conspiracy had meet a new obstacle. In all their brilliant planning, they had failed to foresee the actions of Amidala. She had seen Darth Maul. So had dozens of Royal Security personal. These people were very reliable and had also gained the status of war heroes, and their touting about a Sith being there had the unfortunate result of an unpleasant amount attention being focused on to the issue of who these Sith are and who they were. Yoda and Mace Windu, unable to keep back the tide of alarm over this revelation, stated at Qui-Gon's funeral "There is no doubt this was a Sith." Yoda replied with, "Always two there are. No more, no less." Mace Windu said, trying to keep up appearances, "But which was destroyed? The Master or the apprentice?"

And again, was this simply two wise people talking? Why would Yoda know about the Sith's Rule of Two? This had been made by Darth Bane after the Fall of the Sith and there would have been absolutely no way for Yoda to have known about this, since by the time the rule was made Sith policy the Sith were "extinct" to all public knowledge. Only way for this to be known was for there to have been contact with Sith after the end of the Jedi Civil War, which had been a thousand years beforehand.

This backfired on them. The entire group, even if they were in mourning, would have heard at least part if not all of the conversation. In trying to appear obvious with their bewilderment, suddenly the question was raised. Was this a merely an apprentice? If he were, then where was the Master? An apprentice had successfully battled off two Jedi, and killed one before being cut in half. What would a Master be capable of doing?

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Well, for the most part, they were safe. In fact, some people like Obi-wan Kenobi publicly denied belief that there was a Sith running the Senate when the issue was brought to him while in the clutches of Count Dooku. But, there were those very interested in this revelation, including one Sifo-Dyas who was a member of the Jedi Council.

Not only did they have this movement that was slowly gaining strength, but the Senate was not as moldable as the Conspiracy hoped. The whole plan hinged upon the ability of the Senate to be easily cowed into doing their jobs. For the Sith, it was doing the Sith's bidding, and for the Jedi, doing the jobs they were paid for. Both were almost exactly the same. Any differences were merely semantics. But, the Senate was far more unwildey than they had hoped, and suddenly they were in need to accelerate their plans. If the Senate was not going to do what they were supposed too, it was time for change. Empire perhaps?

The Movement Towards Real War

The Conspiracy had learned several things during the Naboo venture. When the Naboo had been invaded, all focus left Coruscant and moved towards Naboo, allowing them unfettered movements. Peace had ended this and all eyes were turned towards Palpatine. Secondly, power was only had during war times, where the people were desperate to get someone with real power into office. Problem was, there was no war, nor was their likely to be one.

Enter Count Dooku and Sifo-Dyas. Count Dooku had become disgruntled and left the Jedi Order after the last major battle of the Republic, in which the Mandalorians had been overrun and slaughtered. Old and bitter about what had happened, he had given up hope on any more glory. Sifo-Dyas, alarmed by the events he had witnessed, had uncovered the plot, or at least key features to it. He was not so deaf to what he heard and he did the one thing imaginable. He acted.

Sifo-Dyas went off the radar, which alerted the Conspiracy to something was up. They needed someone to find out what he was up to without raising suspicions. Knowing of Count Dooku, Palpatine was asked to approach him. Old men are easily manipulated if told there was still a chance for glory, and as Darth Sidious, Dooku jumped onboard and went to meet Sifo-Dyas, who was also a good friend of his.

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Meeting him at a waypoint, he talked to Sifo-Dyas, who told him he was so alarmed by the Sith, he was going to Kamino to create an army in secret. One that the Jedi would have available when the Sith made their moves. Reports of his knowledge was his downfall, resulting in Dooku killing him. But, all of a sudden, the Conspiracy had the makings of the war they'd need to keep and expand the powers they were enjoying. This army was perfect and Dooku, known for his disgruntled opinions of what was the Jedi Order, would not be suspected when suddenly he announced an end to unity and started a separatist movement, meant to end the Republic. The Confederacy of Independent Systems threw the Senate once more into a tizzy, and once more the boards were sliding in the favor of the power hungry.

Preamble of Peace, Meant to Infuriate

The one person who could have ended any talk to building an army by the Republic itself was Senator Amidala. She had gotten out of being a Queen when her term expired and became a Senator. Her status as War hero gave her an unprecedented voice in the Senate, allowing her thoughts to hold real sway. Infact, so much real sway that she'd prove a deterant to any votes to create a military (even if it was a moot point).

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So, Palpatine came up with a brilliant idea. Hire an assassin that would continually fail, but drive her off of Courscant and into hiding. While off the planet, who would oppose drastic measures successfully? Yoda and his colleague in the Conspiracy, Mace Windu were on board with this. Padme's death was no necessary for them to succeed. She simply needed to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, or the right place at the right time, depending on one's interpretations.

Of course, she had a decoy on her ship when she landed on Coruscant. But what are the odds that a Bounty Hunter (who had hired a second bounty hunter to further throw off things) would know the exact platform she was going to land on and the exact time she'd be landing unless she had very good access? And why would this Senator, who was known for using decoys in difficult times still be failed to be killed? To further the point, how would they know what quarters she'd be sleeping in? Of course, she's a senator, and it wouldn't be hard to find where they were. But how did they know every movement of her security detail and how to penetrate it? Even an aerial droid could have been spotted and was not guaranteed to succeed. And even then, why did she (Zam Wessel) fail while so close?

This all hinged upon one person: Anakin Skywalker.

Next: The Forbidden Love

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Sorry, but I'm just not buying it.

The SW prequels simply weren't clever enough to have these kinds of layers-within-layers. Not to mention Founder had a good point; were the private talks between Yoda and Windu just 'puppet theatre' to make everyone else believe they weren't part of a grander conspiracy? This is also forgetting how the 'bright side' of the force is supposed to work (and it would also mean the good/bad sides are the same). Bad as they are, I just accept the prequels at face value; if they were better written, I could accept a deeper meaning or interpretation, but as they are? They're little better than juvenile, Saturday morning cartoons with lots of money.

This. I give the OP a lot of credit for the effort in pulling all of this from the air. But these films are just not good, much less "deep." Even the insanely superior OT can't claim that it's deep.

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Sorry, but I'm just not buying it.

The SW prequels simply weren't clever enough to have these kinds of layers-within-layers. Not to mention Founder had a good point; were the private talks between Yoda and Windu just 'puppet theatre' to make everyone else believe they weren't part of a grander conspiracy? This is also forgetting how the 'bright side' of the force is supposed to work (and it would also mean the good/bad sides are the same). Bad as they are, I just accept the prequels at face value; if they were better written, I could accept a deeper meaning or interpretation, but as they are? They're little better than juvenile, Saturday morning cartoons with lots of money.

This. I give the OP a lot of credit for the effort in pulling all of this from the air. But these films are just not good, much less "deep." Even the insanely superior OT can't claim that it's deep.

Yeah! I get points for trying!

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A Forbidden Love

Anakin Skywalker. The slave turned Jedi, perhaps the Chosen One himself in the flesh. Showing considerable power and ability, Palpatine had been watching his "career with great interest". Him and his Master Obi-wan were asked by the Council to protect Senator Padme Amidala. The Senator objected to the idea of an additional detail of security, but when the idea of Obi-wan Kenobi was presented, she relented. But then we see something very interesting in the conversation. As he presses her about taking Security and suggests Obi-wan, we see Yoda give a look of suspicion. Was this the look of a man trying to figure out his counter-parts motives? Or was this a look of a man trying to figure out what Palpatine was trying to accomplish.

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Unknowing to the Jedi, but not to Palpatine was Anakins' real feelings for Padme. While Master Yoda and Mace Windu had been busy with his training, Palpatine had become a confidant, becoming a father figure. He knew Anakin had feelings for her, so it was not so much he wanted Obi-wan to protect her, but Anakin to forvce her off Coruscant. Indeed, Anakin forced his way into her good graces. This in turn developed into love under his relentless drive for power in every aspect of his life, including having the woman of his choice. So, when Zam Wessel attempted to assassinate her (which in the last section we see was meant to fail from the beginning) he rushes off to bring down her assailant.

What was not expected though was that Zam Wessel, a changeling, would be captured by the Jedi. She was about to reveal her employer but was killed by Jango Fett. Why? Was it simply a man keeping himself out of the equation? Or was Jango Fett under direct orders to silence her, to keep her from unwittingly getting revealing more of the plot, which clearly Jango didn't need to know or cared, as long as he got money.

With the failed nighttime attempt on Padme's life, the Council agreed that Padme was too much in-danger on Coruscant, so they assigned.....Anakin Skywalker to protect her. And to get her to Naboo. Despite his half-hearted protest and Obi-wan's more reasonable concerns, Mace Windu and Yoda overrode them both. Anakin, now with his beloved in tow (even if she didn't initially feel that way) giddly left Coruscant.

And immediately the assassination attempts stop. Surely if her death was prudent, they could have gone to Naboo, her homeplanet and killed her. She even goes to places she was known to frequent, but there were no further attempts. The dogs were called off, and they were left to occupy each other's time if nothing else, distracting them from the goings on of the conspiracy members, who were driving for their war machine.

The Kamino Equation

Obi-wan Kenobi however was not sent away and infact used his own resources to continue his investigation of the attempts. This had been under orders from the Council, knowing there would be no way to find out more about this Jango Fett. However, in a diner was a man named Dexster, a man who had spent much of his life going from one job to another. He informed him that the weapon that killed Zam Wessel was a Kaminoan saberdart. But, when Kenobi went to explore in the Jedi Archives, it was erased. Next came the strangest thing so far in the plot. He went to Yoda while he was training and told him about Kamino, and it was gone. Yoda then made a big mistake. He asked the children why the planet wasn't there. And one of them said, "Master? Because someone erased it from the Archive memories."

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Yoda chuckled at the response. But was it a simple laugh of a master towards the innocent mind? Or was it a laugh meant to hide his own dismay at the Youngling was spot on? When Obi-wan asked how someone could have erased data from the archives (something that was considered impossible), he told him "Only a Jedi could have erased those files." The implication was later that Dooku was the man behind the data theft. But, Dooku had no reason to erase the files while he was in the Order, since Kamino was a backwater world with only cloning as a source of revenue. And once he left the Order, well....he chose to no longer be a Jedi, so he wasn't one. Only two Jedi would have needed to erase files, and that was Yoda and Mace Windu.

It was decided that it wouldn't hurt for Obi-wan to go see Kamino, since the clone armies would not yet be ready. Why need an army if the vote wasn't yet in on building a military? They needed it to seem natural that suddenly there was an army, maybe a few weeks after the "Yes" vote was cast. So, Kamino got it's first real Jedi visitor in the form of an inquisitive Obi-Wan.

Now the game suddenly got trickier. The Kaminoans had already finished the first wave of troops. And they claimed Sifo-Dyas had placed the order for the army in a time-frame that made Kenobi state confusedly, "Master Sifo-Dyas was killed more than ten years ago." With apologies, Lama Sue, leader of Kamino went and showed him the army. Kenobi then discovered, Jango Fett, the Kaminoans gladly showing them around, not even attempting to hide him, despite the resulting close escape of Jango and his son from the planet showed they weren't meant to be found.

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Simply a case of people who couldn't shut up? Were they allowed to talk or did the conspirators in their pride not think that someone might show up asking questions? Before trying to arrest Jango Fett, he contacted Yoda and Mace Windu and reported about what he had discovered. Mace Windu prompted him to arrest Jango Fett and as soon as the communication ended, Yoda and Obi-wan had a private, yet telling conversation.

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Yoda: Blind we are, if creation of this clone army, we could not see.

The literal interpretation would be they really didn't see it coming. Or, was it concern that they had no idea that the army had been built so fast? There was a time-table for the take over, and this was faster than they had agreed with Sidious and they didn't even realize this was going on.

Mace Windu: I think it is time to tell the Senate that our ability to use the Force has diminished.

Was this simply a man wanting to be honest with those who looked up to him? Or was he panicking, realizing that the army was too fast and they weren't ready? Or was he having second thoughts all of a sudden about this conspiracy? Yoda rebuked him, telling him, "Only the Dark Lord of the Sith knows of our weakness. If revealed, multiply, our enemies will." But if only the Dark Lord of the Sith knew their weakness, and yet they had told Palpatine in the meeting at the beginning of Attack of the Clones about their inability to see the future, was he lying? Or was he giving a wink and a nod to it and telling Mace Windu to stay the course? At either rate, there was need to keep their guard up.

Next: Begun, the Clone Wars Have

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I really do love all this introspection into the "plot" that you've been subjecting yourself to. It makes everything in the PT seem that much more interesting. But the thing about Palpatine's plan was that the smallest bit of common sense would've unravelled everything! All starting with The Phantom Menace! When the Jedi come aboard the Trade Federation control ship, Palpatine immediately orders the boarding transport destroyed and the Jedi to be killed. If Coruscant had gotten any word of the Jedi seemingly "not arriving," as Nute Gunray told Queen Amidala, then they probably would've panicked like all hell. There'd be two unaccounted Jedi, and a mass of burning wreckage in their dock. How can they explain that away?

Instead of killing everyone like an impulsive idiot;

"This turn of events is unfortunate. We must accelerate our plans. Begin landing your troops."

"My lord, is that legal?"

"I will make it legal."

"And the Jedi?"

"The Chancellor should never have brought them into this. Kill them immediately!"

He should've just said,

"Tell the Jedi that there will be no negotiations, tell them that you intend to invade the planet, and then send the Jedi back to Coruscant to inform the Senate."

Much easier than explaining the disappearance of two Jedi Knights and a wrecked cruiser. And as far as making the invasion legal -- there's no need if they're already invading to make her sign a damned treaty to make it so! Ugh, and that's just the surface of his ridiculously stupid plan.

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I really do love all this introspection into the "plot" that you've been subjecting yourself to. It makes everything in the PT seem that much more interesting. But the thing about Palpatine's plan was that the smallest bit of common sense would've unravelled everything! All starting with The Phantom Menace! When the Jedi come aboard the Trade Federation control ship, Palpatine immediately orders the boarding transport destroyed and the Jedi to be killed. If Coruscant had gotten any word of the Jedi seemingly "not arriving," as Nute Gunray told Queen Amidala, then they probably would've panicked like all hell. There'd be two unaccounted Jedi, and a mass of burning wreckage in their dock. How can they explain that away?

Instead of killing everyone like an impulsive idiot;

"This turn of events is unfortunate. We must accelerate our plans. Begin landing your troops."

"My lord, is that legal?"

"I will make it legal."

"And the Jedi?"

"The Chancellor should never have brought them into this. Kill them immediately!"

He should've just said,

"Tell the Jedi that there will be no negotiations, tell them that you intend to invade the planet, and then send the Jedi back to Coruscant to inform the Senate."

Much easier than explaining the disappearance of two Jedi Knights and a wrecked cruiser. And as far as making the invasion legal -- there's no need if they're already invading to make her sign a damned treaty to make it so! Ugh, and that's just the surface of his ridiculously stupid plan.

Yes, which is the problem with most plots and conspiracies. Even a little common sense would have gone a long ways to unraveling his plan. Like the 9-11 Conspiracy theories about SCUD missiles being dressed as airplanes and fired at the Trade Center and Pentagon. First, why fire them at the Trade Centers, where most of the people who can actually manage money? And why hit the Pentagon, which is vital to any plans you have for military operations and defense of the nation? Thus why I don't subscribe to conspiracy theories.

But, doesn't mean they're not fun to think about. ;)

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I'm not a big fan of conspiracy theories, to be honest.

Most of them just seem to be too much introspective navel gazing and tend to fall apart under the lightest scrutiny (such as the 9/11 'truthers'; those people make me sick). Conspiracy theories remind me of the things that seem perfectly rational at 2 am when one is hyped up on too much caffeine and Kafka. Then one gets a good night's sleep, and in the morning it all just seems like so much wet tissue paper....

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That's not to say that there aren't unanswered questions about 9.11 and a host of other events, but that's very different than believing that some vast conspiracy exists.

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I'm not a big fan of conspiracy theories, to be honest.

Most of them just seem to be too much introspective navel gazing and tend to fall apart under the lightest scrutiny (such as the 9/11 'truthers'; those people make me sick). Conspiracy theories remind me of the things that seem perfectly rational at 2 am when one is hyped up on too much caffeine and Kafka. Then one gets a good night's sleep, and in the morning it all just seems like so much wet tissue paper....

Yeah, I've made some very poor decisions at 2 AM that's for sure.

That's not to say that there aren't unanswered questions about 9.11 and a host of other events, but that's very different than believing that some vast conspiracy exists.

True story. As Scotty would say, "The more they over-think the pluming, the easier it is to clog the drain."

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That's not to say that there aren't unanswered questions about 9.11 and a host of other events, but that's very different than believing that some vast conspiracy exists.

And you're right; I'm not suggesting that no one should question any single aspect of the 9/11 commission report (questions are the beginnings of wisdom), but my problem with the 'truthers' is that they go in with their minds already made up. They go into it assuming that a government conspiracy already exists, then they have to manipulate the 'evidence' to fit their worldview. So many of their 'facts' have already been disproven, and yet when they are confronted with the proof? They accuse the information itself of being a part of 'the conspiracy.' In other words, they create a self-reinforcing delusion. Reminds me of 'the birthers'; they claim Obama is not a US citizen, so after much noise made on the subject, he (needlessly) produces his birth certificate. So how do the birthers respond? They (naturally) accuse the document of being a forgery (?!?). It's a no-win with conspiracy nuts because when they're on the defensive, they fight irrationally. You can only have legitimate debate if both sides are rational and have supporting facts/figures for their points of view. My problem with arguing conspiracies is that the pro-conspiracy arguments are usually from an emotional place (i.e, prejudice or numb disbelief), not a logical one.

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And you're right; I'm not suggesting that no one should question any single aspect of the 9/11 commission report (questions are the beginnings of wisdom), but my problem with the 'truthers' is that they go in with their minds already made up. They go into it assuming that a government conspiracy already exists, then they have to manipulate the 'evidence' to fit their worldview. So many of their 'facts' have already been disproven, and yet when they are confronted with the proof? They accuse the information itself of being a part of 'the conspiracy.' In other words, they create a self-reinforcing delusion. Reminds me of 'the birthers'; they claim Obama is not a US citizen, so after much noise made on the subject, he (needlessly) produces his birth certificate. So how do the birthers respond? They (naturally) accuse the document of being a forgery (?!?). It's a no-win with conspiracy nuts because when they're on the defensive, they fight irrationally. You can only have legitimate debate if both sides are rational and have supporting facts/figures for their points of view. My problem with arguing conspiracies is that the pro-conspiracy arguments are usually from an emotional place (i.e, prejudice or numb disbelief), not a logical one.

Reminds one of the differences of having an argument between men and woman. Men argue to make sense, which if you are also a man you could potentially win by out-making sense of your opponent. Women on the other hand don't argue to make sense, they argue to win. And if you are a man, you simply can't win.

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Be​gun, the Clone Wars Have

The members of the conspiracy had made an elaborate strategy for how the war would begin. First, they have the Senator Amidala-absent Senate vote to create an Army. Then, they would orchestrate an "incident" in which they would be seen as saviors if they run off with their new army with the Jedi at the head of it and squash enemy resistance, but do it at such a pace that many of the Separatists as they were commonly called could flee and drag out the Clone Wars. But again, Obi-wan upset the plan. How, one may ask, did this Jedi once again upset the plans of the conspiracy?

In 23 BBY, as he continued the investigation behind the attempts on his friend Padme's life, he had uncovered a cloned army and discovered their host, who had just arrived not knowing he had been unwittingly sold out by the Kaminoans. He fled the scene, and unwittingly brought Kenobi to Geonosis, where the Separatists were turning into their headquarters and the base for their massive army. Failing to kill Kenobi, the Jedi Knight infiltrated the base, and ended up being captured, not before relaying a report through Anakin Skywalker to Master's Yoda and Windu, who happened to be in a meeting with the Chancellor, his aide, and several senators. They could have salvaged the situation in private, and keep closer to their original time table....had not there been video evidence of his capture by a droideka, better known as a Destroyed Droid. The senators demanded action, and they called an emergency meeting of the Senate, in which Representative Jar-Jar Binks of the Gungan portion of the Naboo populace, demanded wartime "Emergency Powers" be conferred on the Supreme Chancellor, which was voted in by an overwhelming majority.

So, Chancellor Palpatine, to save face, ordered the immediate creation of a "Grand Army of the Republic". Then followed one of the classic mistakes. Mace Windu and Yoda, realizing that they had to accelerate their plans, ordered the majority of the Jedi at the Temple to Geonosis while Yoda went to fetch the Clone Army. The original plan had called for both to leave at the same time. But they panicked, leading to a massacre of Jedi in the Geonosis Arena. Only the timely arrival of Master Yoda and the Clone Army saved them. Part of what perpetrated the panicked response was they realized young Skywalker would not stay put and they needed him.

10clones.468.2.jpg

So, a massive battle followed, which followed precisely the course they had laid out. Even Count Dooku, who had the advantage to kill the Chosen One after wounding him, didn't kill him despite there being no way the exhausted padawan or his master (the former not needed for the plot his Master Darth Sidious had) refused to go in for the kill. In a portion lost from the edition of the film, Count Dooku told Sidious after meeting him in his hideout, "The Boy is ripening". Clearly, he was under orders to not kill Skywalker.

But was he an intricate member of the conspiracy? Or was he simply a pawn who thought he was more important? Indeed, did he even know that Mace Windu and Yoda could be in on it? Or was he pleased he was part of the shared power venture with Sidious and simply didn't want to entertain any nothing he wasn't all-important?

At any rate, the battle was won, and at the Jedi Temple, Obi-wan had a quiet contemplative moment with Mace Windu and Yoda. When he said the clones had brought them victory, Yoda lamented, "Victory? Obi-wan, not victory. The shroud of the Dark Side has fallen. Begun, the Clone Wars have."

Every statement was true, form either a literal interpretation or from the viewpoint of conspiracy. In the view point of the Jedi, it was no victory. The Jedi victory would have required no war. And Yoda and Mace WIndu in their own bid for power had gotten in bed with a Sith Lord. They had even already given name to the conflict before it had even begun, otherwise, why call it the "Clone Wars" when it had just begun?

The Prolonged Conflict

CloneBlu4_1288049645.jpg

The Clone Wars raged for three long years, with battle spanning the entire length of the Galaxy. Millions perished and the Jedi led Grand Army of the Republic inflicted massive casualties while the Droid Armies of the Confederacy gave a good accounting of themselves.

A-clone-trooper-valiantly-fights-against-an-army-of-battle-droids-and-super-battle-droids-in-an-action-packed-scene-from-STAR-WARS-THE-CLONE-WARS.-The-Lucasfilm-Animation-production-will-be-released-Friday-Aug.-15-2008-by-Warn-27-650x365.jpg

But, as time passed, and the longer the wars dragged out, several events nearly exposed the entire plot or unraveled their plans. One of these was the emergence of the still living Darth Maul, who had drawn upon the Dark Side to stay alive after being cut in half. He had built an underground empire with Mandalor as his base of operations. SIdious was forced to deal with him personally, because his underground empire had the potential of rivaling the Empire he had planned. There was also the rise of Rush Clovis to taking over the Banking Clans. Palpatine dispatched Lord Tyranus to blackmail Clovis, who wanted to be impartial to the conflict and give money to both sides. If the conspiracy was going to control the galaxy, they needed the entire wealth of the banks. The closest the Conspiracy ever came to failure was when a clone began killing Jedi and was discovered he had an implant which had malfunctioned. This implant was meant to force Clones to follow orders and another clone even removed his and uncovered the truth about the conspiracy (or at least Palpatine grand plans). He was executed to silence him.

But, even without the conspiracy being compromised by a single event, questions began to be raised. Admiral Tarkin in a conversation with General Skywalker, told him the Jedi were slowing down the war. Anakin agreed, realizing that the Jedi Code and leadership weren't allowing what needed done to bring the conflict to a swift end. What they didn't realize was the fact that the Jedi Order did not fit into the plans of the Conspiracy. At least, not the full organization. Public opinion was being stirred against the Jedi, people asking correctly, "Why were the Jedi leading armies, when their role was peace keepers?"

The plan was to purge the Jedi Order of all but a select few who could be trusted to do whatever the Conspiracy wanted. The Jedi Order as a whole would never go along with being the leaders of an Imperial military and carrying out the wills of an Emperor. And years of war would make them a very dangerous threat, being used to battle. Being battle-tested, veterans and users of the Force was a very dangerous combination. And even though their numbers had dwindled from the 10,000+ pre-war numbers, they still remained in the mid-range of that number, and these were the best, having survived war at every turn. They would need to be eliminated to give the Conspiracy the transition to power smoothly sailing.

What Yoda and Mace Windu did not anticipate though, was just how treacherous Darth Sidious could be. And what Yoda and Sidious did not anticipate was how unstable a member Mace Windu truly was.

Next: The Twilight of the Republic

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I'm gonna go against the grain here and say that this is actually pretty cool. I agree that this obviously wasn't the intent of the prequels, but they suddenly seem much more fun when you think of them like this. I don't like conspiracy theories generally, but this certainly explains much of the idiocy of the prequels.

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I too commend AH for the work he put into it (even if I don't think Lucas has the brains to make a story this deep).

I think the "conspiracy" would just work better without Mace and Yoda - to be honest. Like if a group of Jedi (outside of Dooku) were on it - it might work a smidgen better.

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I'm gonna go against the grain here and say that this is actually pretty cool. I agree that this obviously wasn't the intent of the prequels, but they suddenly seem much more fun when you think of them like this. I don't like conspiracy theories generally, but this certainly explains much of the idiocy of the prequels.

It does that. It also helps having both of the Clone Wars series as well, since they certainly give greater depth to Palpatine's plot to be sure, and explain how in Episode III he took over with very little effort.

I too commend AH for the work he put into it (even if I don't think Lucas has the brains to make a story this deep).

I think the "conspiracy" would just work better without Mace and Yoda - to be honest. Like if a group of Jedi (outside of Dooku) were on it - it might work a smidgen better.

In some ways it would, especially since there were groups of Jedi who broke away during the war. And certainly in many ways it would work out better if it was just Yoda.

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I love your theories, but there's always going to be the glaring problem of Dooku getting duped by Palpatine. Being under orders not to kill Skywalker, as well as noticing that the boy is 'ripening' in power, how could he not have realized that he was helping Palpatine groom his next apprentice? Was he really that stupid? Stupid enough to forget the 'rule of two,' and that the Sith have no honor, even between Master and Apprentice? For being considered as one of the more brilliant and revered Jedi Knights in modern galactic history, he really made a ridiculous fo-pah in thinking that Palpatine wouldn't be rid of him by Episode III. Should he have been so shocked when Palpatine ordered Skywalker to kill him? That's how stupid Dooku is, and even General Grievous thought it was just an unfortunate happening;

"But the loss of Count Dooku..."

EVERYONE IN THE GALAXY BEFORE 0 BBY IS DUMB AND STUPID.

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I love your theories, but there's always going to be the glaring problem of Dooku getting duped by Palpatine. Being under orders not to kill Skywalker, as well as noticing that the boy is 'ripening' in power, how could he not have realized that he was helping Palpatine groom his next apprentice? Was he really that stupid? Stupid enough to forget the 'rule of two,' and that the Sith have no honor, even between Master and Apprentice? For being considered as one of the more brilliant and revered Jedi Knights in modern galactic history, he really made a ridiculous fo-pah in thinking that Palpatine wouldn't be rid of him by Episode III. Should he have been so shocked when Palpatine ordered Skywalker to kill him? That's how stupid Dooku is, and even General Grievous thought it was just an unfortunate happening;

"But the loss of Count Dooku..."

EVERYONE IN THE GALAXY BEFORE 0 BBY IS DUMB AND STUPID.

Actually, in fact, he knew Anakin was a possible replacement, because Palpatine/Sidious would have talked about it. In the Clone Wars series, he trained several people (Savage Oppress, Assajj Ventress, General Grievous) as possible apprentices for when he'd make his own move.

As for the quotation "The boy is ripening", I heard it in the theater while watching it with my older brother. It was an extended line of "I have good news, the War has begun. And the boy is ripening." There was also a scene of Clone Troopers of speeders zooming through the dust as well in the theaters that never made it to dvd and blu-ray sadly.

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As for the quotation "The boy is ripening", I heard it in the theater while watching it with my older brother. It was an extended line of "I have good news, the War has begun. And the boy is ripening." There was also a scene of Clone Troopers of speeders zooming through the dust as well in the theaters that never made it to dvd and blu-ray sadly.

More "improvements," no doubt.

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