Sign in to follow this  
Robin Bland

The Music of Star Trek

Recommended Posts

Holy crap, that's GOOD. Dennis McCarthy was truly capable of so much more than he was allowed to actually do, and I've always admired what he was able to do given the constraints placed upon him... especially back in The Next Generation, when the producers really favored that... uh... muted approach to the music. I'm so glad that the latter seasons of Voyager and all of Enterprise was so much less restrained. Say what you will about those shows, they always had excellent music.

McCarthy is unfairly maligned for towing the line, I think. He got a lot of flak after Ron Jones left (or was booted off) TNG, when he responded to Berman's requests that all incidentals become more "textural." But it was he who campaigned for a new approach with both DS9 and Generations - the latter is when he really let rip (and it remains one of my favorite Star Trek scores). Thereafter, things loosened up again. later episodes of DS9 had a whole bunch of interesting new composers, and McCarthy - I dunno, he sounds happier to my ears! I'm less familiar with the music of Voyager, but Enterprise also sports some really good incidental scores, many by McCarthy again and various other DS9 alumni. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy crap, that's GOOD. Dennis McCarthy was truly capable of so much more than he was allowed to actually do, and I've always admired what he was able to do given the constraints placed upon him... especially back in The Next Generation, when the producers really favored that... uh... muted approach to the music. I'm so glad that the latter seasons of Voyager and all of Enterprise was so much less restrained. Say what you will about those shows, they always had excellent music.

McCarthy is unfairly maligned for towing the line, I think. He got a lot of flak after Ron Jones left (or was booted off) TNG, when he responded to Berman's requests that all incidentals become more "textural." But it was he who campaigned for a new approach with both DS9 and Generations - the latter is when he really let rip (and it remains one of my favorite Star Trek scores). Thereafter, things loosened up again. later episodes of DS9 had a whole bunch of interesting new composers, and McCarthy - I dunno, he sounds happier to my ears! I'm less familiar with the music of Voyager, but Enterprise also sports some really good incidental scores, many by McCarthy again and various other DS9 alumni. 

I just LOVE the GEN score.... I can play the nexus theme and end title music till my CD player bleeds. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most people seem to hail Jerry Goldsmith as the best thing that ever happened to Star Trek's music, and I won't argue that a lot of his work was pretty good... But I personally think that Generations' score among the absolute best of the bunch. "The Nexus" is alright, but I'm all about those battle sequences. "Outgunned" and "The Crash" are both pretty awesome. "Soren Kidnaps Geordi," is also pretty good. I was disappointed that it wasn't included on the original soundtrack, so when it appeared on the full release a few years ago, I bought that up real quick.

Voyager's music was pretty good, too, especially when Jay Chattaway was composing. He really seemed to have perfected his craft during the Voyager years. The music from "Scorpion" has always stood out as being magnificent (especially in the moments right before Species 8472 appears for the first time), and I have been waiting years and years and years for it to get released in some form. I stared at the menus on the season 4 DVDs for far too long just so because of the music. "Dark Frontier" and "Endgame" were also pretty momentous in the score department.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most people seem to hail Jerry Goldsmith as the best thing that ever happened to Star Trek's music, and I won't argue that a lot of his work was pretty good... But I personally think that Generations' score among the absolute best of the bunch. "The Nexus" is alright, but I'm all about those battle sequences. "Outgunned" and "The Crash" are both pretty awesome. "Soren Kidnaps Geordi," is also pretty good. I was disappointed that it wasn't included on the original soundtrack, so when it appeared on the full release a few years ago, I bought that up real quick.

Voyager's music was pretty good, too, especially when Jay Chattaway was composing. He really seemed to have perfected his craft during the Voyager years. The music from "Scorpion" has always stood out as being magnificent (especially in the moments right before Species 8472 appears for the first time), and I have been waiting years and years and years for it to get released in some form. I stared at the menus on the season 4 DVDs for far too long just so because of the music. "Dark Frontier" and "Endgame" were also pretty momentous in the score department.

While I still think Goldsmith was the ST gold standard for music, I would certainly understand a case being made for McCarthy's GEN score.  I listen to it quite often, in fact (esp. at Christmas... don't ask; it's my personal nexus). :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kenman   

I like Goldsmith's scores, but I think Horner is my personal favorite, even if he only did two scores...but the score for the Motion Picture is hard to beat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Goldsmith's scores, but I think Horner is my personal favorite, even if he only did two scores...but the score for the Motion Picture is hard to beat. 

Not much argument there, either.  I love the play Search for Spock "Stealing the Enterprise" theme when I'm starting my car in the garage... :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the nice thing about Trek... no one composer "owns" it, or is associated with it. I love Goldsmith's stuff, but I don't think his work is necessarily definitive. Nor is Fred Steiner's, or Dennis McCarthy's, Ron Jones or Jay Chattaway's. It's all part of a very varied and often quite beautiful and inspiring musical canon.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the nice thing about Trek... no one composer "owns" it, or is associated with it. I love Goldsmith's stuff, but I don't think his work is necessarily definitive. Nor is Fred Steiner's, or Dennis McCarthy's, Ron Jones or Jay Chattaway's. It's all part of a very varied and often quite beautiful and inspiring musical canon.  

Trek's music is rather like ST itself over the years; mutable, adaptive.  It is constantly reinventing itself to suit differing audiences over the years.   Unlike say, John Williams' gorgeous but somewhat fixed theme for Star Wars.   Those movies can NEVER open with any theme other than that blast of brassy fanfare.   Star Trek however, is lucky to have more than one fixed musical template... 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sim   
There were no more character themes - you never got that fantastic vocoder 'Borg chorus' after Jones was axed. And yet that was one of the things that helped make them so eerie in BoBW!

 

That was one of the reasons I bought the CD soundtrack of BOBW. And yes, it would've been nice if that'd been retained as their theme throughout the series (and on VGR).

Yes. One of the greatest disappointments I felt after watching FC for the first time in the theatre was the absence of the Borg chorus!

Unconsciously, I had just expected the Borg chorus to appear in the movie. I swear, the Borg were twice as scary with that chorus!

Most people seem to hail Jerry Goldsmith as the best thing that ever happened to Star Trek's music, and I won't argue that a lot of his work was pretty good... But I personally think that Generations' score among the absolute best of the bunch. "The Nexus" is alright, but I'm all about those battle sequences. "Outgunned" and "The Crash" are both pretty awesome. "Soren Kidnaps Geordi," is also pretty good. I was disappointed that it wasn't included on the original soundtrack, so when it appeared on the full release a few years ago, I bought that up real quick.

Voyager's music was pretty good, too, especially when Jay Chattaway was composing. He really seemed to have perfected his craft during the Voyager years. The music from "Scorpion" has always stood out as being magnificent (especially in the moments right before Species 8472 appears for the first time), and I have been waiting years and years and years for it to get released in some form. I stared at the menus on the season 4 DVDs for far too long just so because of the music. "Dark Frontier" and "Endgame" were also pretty momentous in the score department.

While I still think Goldsmith was the ST gold standard for music, I would certainly understand a case being made for McCarthy's GEN score.  I listen to it quite often, in fact (esp. at Christmas... don't ask; it's my personal nexus). :P

When GEN came to the theatres in Germany in February 1995, I couldn't wait to see it. Unfortunately, my parents took me on holidays for the first two weeks, so I had to wait!

But: I already had the GEN soundtrack with me on these holidays on the Atlantic island of Madeira, and would listen to it up and down, on my walkman, when hiking in the fascinating landscape there. This combination, subtropical(?) hiking and the GEN soundtrack, will stay in my mind forever as inseperable.

Futurama borrowed that Amok Time fight music in one of their episodes. Fry and Zoidberg had to fight to the death in an arena so that music was entirely appropriate :giggle:/>

 

 

 

 

I've never paid a lot of attention to music (and it's not my kind of music anyway) but I have to mention the music from TNG's "Booby Trap". I like that one. It's basically the only one I've NOTICED, haha. (Well okay "The Inner Light" has memorable music as well.)

 

My favorite, however, is Jono's Talarian music that he listens to and that horrifies Jean-Luc so much. That scene is one of the BEST scenes EVER. :P/>

 

 

"Shut off that damn noise." :laugh:/>

 

(I know; wrong episode, but it seemed to fit...). :giggle:/>

 

 

 

I liked "Booby Trap"'s music too. Haunting. Was that Ron Jones as well?

 

 

I love how he doesn't even know what it is and how he has to scream to make the computer stop and how Jono just lies there and is all like BLERGH THIS NEW STEP-DAD RUINS EVERYTHING. I'd have been all like "OMG JONO WHAT IS THIS DO YOU HAVE MORE OF IT". I can just see the horrified look on Jean-Luc's face.

 

I had a look at wiki and yes it says Ron Jones did the score.

 

 

I love Jono's music too :)/> I also love the Klingon 'music' Jeffrey was listening to in VOY: Real Life.

 

 

I remember that! For some reason I had that in my head as a Simpsons episode. Maybe they did it twice - that fight music is iconic.

 

Think it was a big mistake for the TNG producers to get rid of Ron Jones. His dramatic flourishes were much missed after season 4. You could tell that the other house composers - McCarthy, Chattaway - were really told to tone down any personality of their own, also. After that point ST TV music became a lot more soft focus, if you'll pardon a visual term. Generic. There were no more character themes - you never got that fantastic vocoder 'Borg chorus' after Jones was axed. And yet that was one of the things that helped make them so eerie in BoBW!

Ah, I had never read behind-the-scenes stuff on this, but I too noticed that TNG's music was *much* more memorable in season 3, than in the later seasons.

From the top of my head, the "Booby Trap" sound is outstanding (much better than the episode, actually), so is "Tin Man". And as I said above, the "Borg chorus" just tops all of it.

I even find much of the season 1 music memorable, although it sounds very 80s in retrospect. For some reason, I just love the music in "Datalore", for example.

What the heck were they thinking by asking the music to become more generic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unconsciously, I had just expected the Borg chorus to appear in the movie. I swear, the Borg were twice as scary with that chorus!

I think a good chorus could make a herd of white rabbits frightening...  :laugh:

 

I agree that I too, missed the Borg chorus.  It also echoed the idea of them being a soulless collective. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Corylea   

I love the bass guitar theme they play in TOS whenever there's something Vulcan going on.  It's very simple, and yet it really seems to set the mood.  Oooh, Weird Vulcan Stuff coming.  Cool!  I love that stuff. ;)

One of Leonard Nimoy's last public appearances was a performance of "Music Inspired by Outer Space" with the Boston Pops, a year ago in May.  (I live in a suburb of Boston, and of course you all know that Mr. Nimoy was born and raised there.  He's been good to Boston, for all that he hasn't lived here for decades.)  My husband and I went to the program, and the first thing they played was Alexander Courage's TOS theme.  I've heard that HOW many hundreds of times?  And yet I was crying by the time they finished the fourth note. 

Hearing the TOS theme played by a full orchestra was a really emotional experience.  Of course part of it was that Mr. Nimoy was right there -- we were in the 3rd row, maybe 25 feet from him -- but part of it was that hearing it played by a live orchestra was just so much MORE than hearing it on the television.  And part of it was a feeling of validation, the idea that Boston's symphony orchestra found Star Trek music worthy of notice, worthy to be practiced and played in public.  I cried, and I'm not even embarrassed. :)

(My husband likes Star Trek okay, but he doesn't really comprehend my devotion to it.  So he went with me and enjoyed the program, but he didn't quite understand why hearing the TOS music played by a full orchestra could make me CRY.)

They didn't just play Star Trek music, though -- they played the theme from E. T. and the theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey (which made our hair stand on end), and the theme from Star Wars.  I sometimes wonder if Star Trek would be even more popular than it is if it had had John Williams composing a massively popular score for it...

Edited by Corylea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The biggest disappointment for me in the First Contact soundtrack wasn't the lack of a Borg chorus (which I didn't realize was something that would've been awesome until just now), but the fact that they left some of the best music off the soundtrack! The flight of the Phoenix was great, and when I got that CD into the CD player back in 1996, I was eager to hear it again... only to be disappointed! Thankfully it was included on the extended soundtrack like 15 years later. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The biggest disappointment for me in the First Contact soundtrack wasn't the lack of a Borg chorus (which I didn't realize was something that would've been awesome until just now), but the fact that they left some of the best music off the soundtrack! The flight of the Phoenix was great, and when I got that CD into the CD player back in 1996, I was eager to hear it again... only to be disappointed! Thankfully it was included on the extended soundtrack like 15 years later. 

The extended soundtracks are the best; I own II-V, and the 20th anniversary of I.  

I own the regular version of GEN, but it's OK; my favorite tracks are on there anyway. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were no more character themes - you never got that fantastic vocoder 'Borg chorus' after Jones was axed. And yet that was one of the things that helped make them so eerie in BoBW!

 

That was one of the reasons I bought the CD soundtrack of BOBW. And yes, it would've been nice if that'd been retained as their theme throughout the series (and on VGR).

Yes. One of the greatest disappointments I felt after watching FC for the first time in the theatre was the absence of the Borg chorus!

Unconsciously, I had just expected the Borg chorus to appear in the movie. I swear, the Borg were twice as scary with that chorus!

Most people seem to hail Jerry Goldsmith as the best thing that ever happened to Star Trek's music, and I won't argue that a lot of his work was pretty good... But I personally think that Generations' score among the absolute best of the bunch. "The Nexus" is alright, but I'm all about those battle sequences. "Outgunned" and "The Crash" are both pretty awesome. "Soren Kidnaps Geordi," is also pretty good. I was disappointed that it wasn't included on the original soundtrack, so when it appeared on the full release a few years ago, I bought that up real quick.

Voyager's music was pretty good, too, especially when Jay Chattaway was composing. He really seemed to have perfected his craft during the Voyager years. The music from "Scorpion" has always stood out as being magnificent (especially in the moments right before Species 8472 appears for the first time), and I have been waiting years and years and years for it to get released in some form. I stared at the menus on the season 4 DVDs for far too long just so because of the music. "Dark Frontier" and "Endgame" were also pretty momentous in the score department.

While I still think Goldsmith was the ST gold standard for music, I would certainly understand a case being made for McCarthy's GEN score.  I listen to it quite often, in fact (esp. at Christmas... don't ask; it's my personal nexus). :P

When GEN came to the theatres in Germany in February 1995, I couldn't wait to see it. Unfortunately, my parents took me on holidays for the first two weeks, so I had to wait!

But: I already had the GEN soundtrack with me on these holidays on the Atlantic island of Madeira, and would listen to it up and down, on my walkman, when hiking in the fascinating landscape there. This combination, subtropical(?) hiking and the GEN soundtrack, will stay in my mind forever as inseperable.

Futurama borrowed that Amok Time fight music in one of their episodes. Fry and Zoidberg had to fight to the death in an arena so that music was entirely appropriate :giggle:/>

 

 

 

 

I've never paid a lot of attention to music (and it's not my kind of music anyway) but I have to mention the music from TNG's "Booby Trap". I like that one. It's basically the only one I've NOTICED, haha. (Well okay "The Inner Light" has memorable music as well.)

 

My favorite, however, is Jono's Talarian music that he listens to and that horrifies Jean-Luc so much. That scene is one of the BEST scenes EVER. :P/>

 

 

"Shut off that damn noise." :laugh:/>

 

(I know; wrong episode, but it seemed to fit...). :giggle:/>

 

 

 

I liked "Booby Trap"'s music too. Haunting. Was that Ron Jones as well?

 

 

I love how he doesn't even know what it is and how he has to scream to make the computer stop and how Jono just lies there and is all like BLERGH THIS NEW STEP-DAD RUINS EVERYTHING. I'd have been all like "OMG JONO WHAT IS THIS DO YOU HAVE MORE OF IT". I can just see the horrified look on Jean-Luc's face.

 

I had a look at wiki and yes it says Ron Jones did the score.

 

 

I love Jono's music too :)/> I also love the Klingon 'music' Jeffrey was listening to in VOY: Real Life.

 

 

I remember that! For some reason I had that in my head as a Simpsons episode. Maybe they did it twice - that fight music is iconic.

 

Think it was a big mistake for the TNG producers to get rid of Ron Jones. His dramatic flourishes were much missed after season 4. You could tell that the other house composers - McCarthy, Chattaway - were really told to tone down any personality of their own, also. After that point ST TV music became a lot more soft focus, if you'll pardon a visual term. Generic. There were no more character themes - you never got that fantastic vocoder 'Borg chorus' after Jones was axed. And yet that was one of the things that helped make them so eerie in BoBW!

Ah, I had never read behind-the-scenes stuff on this, but I too noticed that TNG's music was *much* more memorable in season 3, than in the later seasons.

From the top of my head, the "Booby Trap" sound is outstanding (much better than the episode, actually), so is "Tin Man". And as I said above, the "Borg chorus" just tops all of it.

I even find much of the season 1 music memorable, although it sounds very 80s in retrospect. For some reason, I just love the music in "Datalore", for example.

What the heck were they thinking by asking the music to become more generic?

There's a book called The Music of Star Trek by Jeff Bond that I have somewhere and it touches on the subject, as do the Cinefantastiques that were published after each season of TNG and Ds9 aired. It was largely down to Rick Berman's personal taste - at the time, he didn't want anything too strident or distracting from the drama, IIRC. It's true that bad incidental music can be distracting, but damned if I can recall anything that fits that bill in the whole ST canon. Berman seemed to be reacting against any kind of refrain, or melody, any repeated motif. He didn't like the fact that Ron Jones would quote the old Enterprise theme, and he really didn't like the Borg chorus. This is a mystery to me personally, as good incidentals add to the atmosphere of a scene, not take away. The Borg chorus is clearly an example of incidentals succeeding superbly - even at the time, it was a fan favorite. It enhanced the drama, in no uncertain terms. Nevertheless, he was let go at the end of season 4 of TNG and thereafter you got the textural,sonic wallpaper rather than the emotional,undercurrents. That is, until DS9 and Generations came along and McCarthy succeeded in bringing back some greater color and orchestral flourishes to proceedings. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I love the bass guitar theme they play in TOS whenever there's something Vulcan going on.  It's very simple, and yet it really seems to set the mood.  Oooh, Weird Vulcan Stuff coming.  Cool!  I love that stuff. ;)

One of Leonard Nimoy's last public appearances was a performance of "Music Inspired by Outer Space" with the Boston Pops, a year ago in May.  (I live in a suburb of Boston, and of course you all know that Mr. Nimoy was born and raised there.  He's been good to Boston, for all that he hasn't lived here for decades.)  My husband and I went to the program, and the first thing they played was Alexander Courage's TOS theme.  I've heard that HOW many hundreds of times?  And yet I was crying by the time they finished the fourth note. 

Hearing the TOS theme played by a full orchestra was a really emotional experience.  Of course part of it was that Mr. Nimoy was right there -- we were in the 3rd row, maybe 25 feet from him -- but part of it was that hearing it played by a live orchestra was just so much MORE than hearing it on the television.  And part of it was a feeling of validation, the idea that Boston's symphony orchestra found Star Trek music worthy of notice, worthy to be practiced and played in public.  I cried, and I'm not even embarrassed. :)

(My husband likes Star Trek okay, but he doesn't really comprehend my devotion to it.  So he went with me and enjoyed the program, but he didn't quite understand why hearing the TOS music played by a full orchestra could make me CRY.)

They didn't just play Star Trek music, though -- they played the theme from E. T. and the theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey (which made our hair stand on end), and the theme from Star Wars.  I sometimes wonder if Star Trek would be even more popular than it is if it had had John Williams composing a massively popular score for it...

I love that bass thing too - 'Vulcan Biology' by Gerald Fried. He also composed the fight music from that same episode, Amok Time, that might be among the most famous incidental music of all time. It was even parodied on The Simpsons. You can't hear it without thinking of Kirk's ripped shirt. 

I understand the emotion involved in hearing the performance live of beloved music, also, especially of the orchestral variety. I'm a big fan of John Barry, and saw him perform on two separate occasions in London. Hearing some of the music he's written performed live was so evocative, such a thrill. I was moved to tears when he did Somewhere in Time, surely one of the most romantic theme tunes ever committed to film. That's a lovely memory you have of the Boston Pops performance... Something to cherish. 

As for a big recognizable theme for Star Trek - I dunno, it has several. As I mentioned in a discussion Sehlat and I were having upthread, I like that Trek has a great many composers. It shows its roots in TV, in the necessary approach of its production. There's a certain egalitarianism to it. Much as I adore John Williams, and the Star Wars theme, I don't think I'd like Trek to have one single, all-encompassing piece of music to represent it. If they'd use Courage's theme on TNG, it would have had less of its own identity. (That it used the theme for ST:TMP is an accident of Roddenberry's wish fulfillment coming full circle - and I think it's more recognizable to many as the TNG theme than it is the TMP and STV theme.) same with DS9, Voyager and Enterprise - though I reckon the latter should really have used the lovely piece Dennis McCarthy composed for it ('Archer's Theme' heard on the end credits). I always wishes TAS would've used Courage's theme, though. It has a kind of ersatz version of same. 

Trek is a funny beast(s), because it's really six different TV shows and a series of movies all set in the same universe (ok, and JJverse too) rather than a single ongoing story like, say, Doctor Who. I've actually been wondering if the spin-off Star Wars films will use John Williams' main theme...? Maybe as an intro, maybe they'll quote it before establishing their own look and themes...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand the emotion involved in hearing the performance live of beloved music, also, especially of the orchestral variety. I'm a big fan of John Barry, and saw him perform on two separate occasions in London. Hearing some of the music he's written performed live was so evocative, such a thrill. I was moved to tears when he did Somewhere in Time, surely one of the most romantic theme tunes ever committed to film. That's a lovely memory you have of the Boston Pops performance... Something to cherish. 

To paraphrase Claude Lacombe (Francois Truffaut) in "Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind": "Monsieur Bland?  I envy you..." :thumbup:

Trek is a funny beast(s), because it's really six different TV shows and a series of movies all set in the same universe (ok, and JJverse too) rather than a single ongoing story like, say, Doctor Who. I've actually been wondering if the spin-off Star Wars films will use John Williams' main theme...? Maybe as an intro, maybe they'll quote it before establishing their own look and themes...

 Unlike Star Trek, the theme to Star Wars is as defining as the sound effects or lightsaber sounds.   The music of SW kind of signified a new era in both sound quality (Dolby, later THX, etc) and a return to unabashedly romantic, lush, orchestral music for feature films.    

Not even ST or DW's iconic theme signified that kind of aural 'new wave' like SW did...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Corylea   

 

I love that bass thing too - 'Vulcan Biology' by Gerald Fried.

Ah, thanks for telling me the title of it.  I have a lot of Star Trek stuff, but not the soundtracks, so I don't know the official name for any of the pieces.

 

I understand the emotion involved in hearing the performance live of beloved music, also, especially of the orchestral variety. I'm a big fan of John Barry, and saw him perform on two separate occasions in London. Hearing some of the music he's written performed live was so evocative, such a thrill. I was moved to tears when he did Somewhere in Time, surely one of the most romantic theme tunes ever committed to film.

Aww, that's sweet.  I like knowing that about you. :)

 

As for a big recognizable theme for Star Trek - I dunno, it has several.

Of course it does; I didn't mean to imply that Star Trek music was obscure.  But Star Trek doesn't have anything that's had the massive cultural penetration of the Star Wars theme.  I think that's good in some ways -- as  you said, it gives the various incarnations of Star Trek their own identity. 

But when Star Wars used the great music from the good movies for the bad movies, I think it kinda imparted some of the luster of the music (and the movies it was associated with) to movies that didn't actually deserve it.  Not that a bad movie can be totally redeemed by good music, but emotions are funny things, and they're strongly tied to music.  Play the music that has meant "something really cool is coming" at the beginning of the movie, and you just may convince people that what follows is cooler than it actually was. :P

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Robin Bland said:

An interview with stalwart Trek composer Dennis McCarthy from last year (just came across it):

http://www.runmovies.eu/a-new-enterprise-for-dennis-mccarthy/

Very interesting paragraph about how McCarthy felt with the use of “Faith of the Heart” as the main title:

 

"I like the song, but I don’t understand what the song represents to the show. I’ve felt a moment of inspiration on Alexander Courage’s horn fanfare, Jerry’s NEXT GENERATION and VOYAGER themes, even my DEEP SPACE NINE theme which I think have defined what STAR TREK’s supposed to be. Rick heard it in PATCH ADAMS and loved it, and decided to acquire it for the ENTERPRISE main title. If you get a chance, take the ENTERPRISE soundtrack CD and play “Archer’s Theme” against the visuals for the Main Title, and you’ll find out where the hits are."

 

I’ve often listened to the end title credits music and just ‘head-canoned’ it as the main title theme.   When I think of ENT, I don’t hear FOTH; I hear the end title music.   You hear it throughout the show as the ’theme’; it’s played at different tempos, with different instruments, etc. and sometimes you’ll hear just as a phrase of it, but to me, that was the theme of ENT, not FOTH.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Sehlat Vie said:

Very interesting paragraph about how McCarthy felt with the use of “Faith of the Heart” as the main title:

 

"I like the song, but I don’t understand what the song represents to the show. I’ve felt a moment of inspiration on Alexander Courage’s horn fanfare, Jerry’s NEXT GENERATION and VOYAGER themes, even my DEEP SPACE NINE theme which I think have defined what STAR TREK’s supposed to be. Rick heard it in PATCH ADAMS and loved it, and decided to acquire it for the ENTERPRISE main title. If you get a chance, take the ENTERPRISE soundtrack CD and play “Archer’s Theme” against the visuals for the Main Title, and you’ll find out where the hits are."

 

I’ve often listened to the end title credits music and just ‘head-canoned’ it as the main title theme.   When I think of ENT, I don’t hear FOTH; I hear the end title music.   You hear it throughout the show as the ’theme’; it’s played at different tempos, with different instruments, etc. and sometimes you’ll hear just as a phrase of it, but to me, that was the theme of ENT, not FOTH.

 

Yeah. The way he talks about Berman falling in love with the song, too. It always felt grafted on - it was a terrrible idea then and still is, even though I'm so used to it now. I even sort of like it, in the sense that I've become so familiar with it - but it's stylistically too big a break with what came before. I often wish that DVD and blu-ray sets came with the option to play Archer's Theme over the title credits instead of that. It just works. McCarthy knew exactly what he was doing, and Berman should've trusted him more. He's a composer; he had much better instincts for how the music should be. 

There's so much to read between the lines there. It sounds a little resigned... weary. Berman making yet another stupid imposition on his creative team instead of delegating, pulling back and letting them get on with it. He didn't stop here - exhibit Z, These Are the Voyages, Your Honor.  

Where My Heart Will Take Me is an example of Berman thinking that his personal taste was everyone's, and everyone would respond to it the same way he did. It has none of the universality of McCarthy's approach. 

Edited by Robin Bland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Robin Bland said:

Where My Heart Will Take Me is an example of Berman thinking that his personal taste was everyone's, and everyone would respond to it the same way he did. It has none of the universality of McCarthy's approach. 

^
Ah, thanks.  I always thought it was “Faith of the Heart.”  Appreciate the heads up. ;)

And yes, Berman probably thought it’d be really cool to use a pop song to differentiate this ST from the pack, and maybe (in hindsight) it could’ve worked, but for me?  That song (while it has very Trekkian-lyrics) just sounds so run-of-the-mill generic.   Even in “Patch Adams” (where I first heard it) it sounded mediocre (for the record, I loved the late Robin Williams; the man was a genius... but Patch Adams was NOT his best work; not by a long shot). 

16 minutes ago, Robin Bland said:

There's so much to read between the lines there. It sounds a little resigned... weary. Berman making yet another stupid imposition on his creative team instead of delegating, pulling back and letting them get on with it. He didn't stop here - exhibit Z, These Are the Voyages, Your Honor.

^
tenor.gif

My therapist told me that episode never happened.  I have the lobotomy scars to prove it. :laugh:

22 minutes ago, Robin Bland said:

I often wish that DVD and blu-ray sets came with the option to play Archer's Theme over the title credits instead of that. It just works. McCarthy knew exactly what he was doing, and Berman should've trusted him more. He's a composer; he had much better instincts for how the music should be. 

bill-hader-this.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this