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How would you change Enterprise?

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As you pointed out, it simply isn't possible to reconcile the two.

I agree. For some folks it comes down to a decision - either ignore most of TOS or ignore most of ENT. I choose to ignore most of ENT because I love TOS so much. Others choose to ignore most of TOS because they like ENT better. Others resort to time line explanations. We all have our own ways of coming up with explanations, and I for one find it fascinating how many different ways there are of approaching this "problem". Trek fans are a creative bunch, after all.

I don't really ignore either TOS or ENT really (even though I love TOS far more than I do ENT). For me, it's just a matter of it not bothering me so much. I may kid about how some of TOS' tech is so ridiculously outdated (although it also 'inspired' a lot of our current tech to be honest), but at the end of the day ST is not about technology; it's about adventures with favorite characters. I can watch TOS and just ignore that the computers make loud tabulating noises or that our current phones are smaller and more efficient than the 'walkie talkie' communicators. These things really don't bother me too much. A good story (and even better characters) is always paramount.

This. I just kind of ignore that things look so "primitive" because the obvious reason that it was the 60s. I know this sounds cheesy but...just pretend. Make believe that the tech is far more advanced than it appears. It helps. As for the clothes? ..............................the 60s retro look came back temporarily............yeah......let's just pretend ok? :P

As for Enterprise on what I'd change?

I like everyone elses suggestions. Get rid of that ridiculous Akiraprise and try to make the ones a bit more primitive. Doesn't have to be bullets perse but something else. Nuclear weapons (or some advanced variation of them) NO photon torpedoes or whatever. Way too early.

Honestly? I would NOT make another Enterprise (the ship). Besides the fact it contradicts lore (so they had to come up with the "oh...uh...they meant the first UFP enterprise....yeah...). Ugh. I wouldn't want another "explore" the cosmos stuff. I appreciate that they wanted to show the beginnings of Starfleet, but I'd rather see the beginnings of the UFP. Political alliances being made, Romulans behind the scenes being intrigued by these humans expanding quickly and forging alliances, maybe showing how Roddenberry's Earth began to form. All we got was a "we got rid of all our problems in a few decades. Suck on that VULCANS!" It's the same thing they did in the later series: "just pretend all the problems are solved. don't focus on it." Great... More of the same.

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Honestly? I would NOT make another Enterprise (the ship). Besides the fact it contradicts lore (so they had to come up with the "oh...uh...they meant the first UFP enterprise....yeah...). Ugh. I wouldn't want another "explore" the cosmos stuff. I appreciate that they wanted to show the beginnings of Starfleet, but I'd rather see the beginnings of the UFP. Political alliances being made, Romulans behind the scenes being intrigued by these humans expanding quickly and forging alliances, maybe showing how Roddenberry's Earth began to form. All we got was a "we got rid of all our problems in a few decades. Suck on that VULCANS!" It's the same thing they did in the later series: "just pretend all the problems are solved. don't focus on it." Great... More of the same.

I agree with this. No ship named Enterprise because this just creates too many canon issues. And yes, I would have loved to see the beginnings of the UFP! Canon doesn't offer THAT much on this issue, so, there would have been a lot more room to explore for them. And less canon to violate.

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Sorry, but this just wouldn't work.

Fusion power could NOT generate anywhere near enough power to warp spacetime. Neither could antimatter really, but it's more serviceable than fusion power (that would be as bad as ST09's brewery-engine room with water turbines). Besides, Zefram Cochrane used those same principles of matter/antimatter for his warp ship (the nacelles of the Phoenix work the same as later ships); why would the NX-01 (which is 100 years hence) be less advanced? As for dilithium? Maybe it was 'discovered' in the 22nd century... who knows?

Hmm, I disagree. If you get a moment look up the Starfleet Museum's pages on pre-UFP ships and the development of antimatter reactors, I think it's a plausible development.

Plus, we don't know what power plant was used aboard the Phoenix, but we can't reasonably assume Cochrane used antimatter. Do you think that, given how costly it is to produce even now, and considering the post-nuclear devastation of the era, that he could have synthesised enough antimatter to fuel a warp engine? The Phoenix was a converted nuclear missile - there's a perfect energy source right there. It may not be too much of a stretch to assume that the "warp core"* Riker spoke of was in fact a controlled detonation of the warhead.

*As much as I like First Contact, this is another example of being spoon-fed twenty-fourth century Star Trek in completely the wrong setting. I can forgive Riker for his twenty-fourth century lingo but there was so such thing as a warp core as we know it when the Phoenix launched.

-----

Another change - real-time communication with Earth. Get rid of it! This is a deep-space ship, a deep-space mission, yet Enterprise can maintain real-time contact with Starfleet when over a hundred light-years away. The Enterprise-D can't even do that half the time! All the blag about dropping subspace amplifiers, that doesn't solve it at all. Even the dialogue states they're only to "clear up reception a bit", and in the same conversation it's stated that Enterprise is a hundred light-years out. Very, very bad.

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Doesn't have to be bullets perse but something else. Nuclear weapons (or some advanced variation of them) NO photon torpedoes or whatever. Way too early.

Agreed.

In "Balance of Terror", Spock says that the first Earth/Romulan war was fought with 'primitive atomic weapons.' That'd yield some extra continuity points.

Hmm, I disagree. If you get a moment look up the Starfleet Museum's pages on pre-UFP ships and the development of antimatter reactors, I think it's a plausible development.

Plus, we don't know what power plant was used aboard the Phoenix, but we can't reasonably assume Cochrane used antimatter. Do you think that, given how costly it is to produce even now, and considering the post-nuclear devastation of the era, that he could have synthesised enough antimatter to fuel a warp engine? The Phoenix was a converted nuclear missile - there's a perfect energy source right there. It may not be too much of a stretch to assume that the "warp core"* Riker spoke of was in fact a controlled detonation of the warhead.

It's not really a matter of my personal opinion so much as what is possible and not possible with nuclear power (i.e, fission/fusion). The yield of one fusion warhead would NOT be anywhere near enough power (neither would hundreds of thousands; earth's entire arsenal wouldn't do the trick).

They've mentioned MANY times on both TOS and TNG that the impulse drive uses fusion power, but NOT the warp drive.

TNG's "Peak Performance" made it very clear that antimatter is mandatory for warp drive. And impulse engines (the fusion powered ones) haven't changed design at least as far back as 200 years (Geordi, "Relics").

Besides, the sun is a giant fusion reactor and you'd need many hundreds (or more) of them to 'warp' spacetime to exceed the speed of light. Using atomic power to bend space would be a bit like moving your car by many tiny wind turbines as opposed to an internal combustion engine; yes, it's 'nature's way' but it's hardly efficient or practical. Atomic power as a means of exceeding the speed of light went out with 1960s "Lost In Space"; science geeks like me would just laugh the idea right off of the screen. You might as well have the NX-01 run on coal for that matter....

I just assumed that Cochrane and his team also found a fast, cheap way to produce antimatter; maybe it was a development made to help earth bounce back from the post-atomic horror (maybe that development inspired his warp idea; much as weaponized rockets of WW2 inspired future lunar travel). Its very possible that an underground nuclear missile complex would also house a secret particle accelerator or some other heavy atomic industrial plant. Because his warp drive clearly operates with the same characteristics as later engines in the ST universe (the stretch/flash signature) the principles have to be same as well; matter/antimatter integration generating a subspace bubble around the ship to allow it to remain stationary as spacetime itself warps to allow it to reach point B a lot faster. That's been a precept of the show forever. Atomic power (even fusion) is a joke compared to the near 100% efficiency of a matter/antimatter yield. No self-respecting starship should be without it. ;)

*As much as I like First Contact, this is another example of being spoon-fed twenty-fourth century Star Trek in completely the wrong setting. I can forgive Riker for his twenty-fourth century lingo but there was so such thing as a warp core as we know it when the Phoenix launched.

A warp core doesn't have to be a giant stack to power the Phoenix's flight.

It may be only enough matter/antimatter integration for a VERY short test flight (the Phoenix was designed to break the warp barrier for a only a few minutes; not cruise on down to Proxima Centauri...).

Chuck Yeager's sound-breaking X-1 prototype couldn't fly to Paris, you know.... ;)

The Curiosity and Viking Mars probes both used miniaturized nuclear power plants that would fit easily in a car. But they couldn't power a nuclear aircraft carrier...

Another change - real-time communication with Earth. Get rid of it! This is a deep-space ship, a deep-space mission, yet Enterprise can maintain real-time contact with Starfleet when over a hundred light-years away. The Enterprise-D can't even do that half the time! All the blag about dropping subspace amplifiers, that doesn't solve it at all. Even the dialogue states they're only to "clear up reception a bit", and in the same conversation it's stated that Enterprise is a hundred light-years out. Very, very bad.

This I agree VERY much on.

Even on TOS, it took over three weeks to get a reply from Starfleet at the neutral zone (although curiously, Yeoman Rand delivers command's reply by the episode's end, which is only a day....).

Having real-time communication 'decreases' the daunting distance a bit too much, and makes it too '24th century' as you say. And besides, they only had a handful of subspace relays deployed! How COULD they have maintained such real-time (and clean) communications without the elaborate subspace networks of later ST? It'd be a bit like running today's sophisticated global electronics network using just the Telstar One satellite of the 1960s .... :dontgetit:

Edited by Sehlat Vie

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Doesn't have to be bullets perse but something else. Nuclear weapons (or some advanced variation of them) NO photon torpedoes or whatever. Way too early.

Agreed.

In "Balance of Terror", Spock says that the first Earth/Romulan war was fought with 'primitive atomic weapons.' That'd yield some extra continuity points.

Hmm, I disagree. If you get a moment look up the Starfleet Museum's pages on pre-UFP ships and the development of antimatter reactors, I think it's a plausible development.

Plus, we don't know what power plant was used aboard the Phoenix, but we can't reasonably assume Cochrane used antimatter. Do you think that, given how costly it is to produce even now, and considering the post-nuclear devastation of the era, that he could have synthesised enough antimatter to fuel a warp engine? The Phoenix was a converted nuclear missile - there's a perfect energy source right there. It may not be too much of a stretch to assume that the "warp core"* Riker spoke of was in fact a controlled detonation of the warhead.

It's not really a matter of my personal opinion so much as what is possible and not possible with nuclear power (i.e, fission/fusion). The yield of one fusion warhead would NOT be anywhere near enough power (neither would hundreds of thousands; earth's entire arsenal wouldn't do the trick).

They've mentioned MANY times on both TOS and TNG that the impulse drive uses fusion power, but NOT the warp drive.

TNG's "Peak Performance" made it very clear that antimatter is mandatory for warp drive. And impulse engines (the fusion powered ones) haven't changed design at least as far back as 200 years (Geordi, "Relics").

Besides, the sun is a giant fusion reactor and you'd need many hundreds (or more) of them to 'warp' spacetime to exceed the speed of light. Using atomic power to bend space would be a bit like moving your car by many tiny wind turbines as opposed to an internal combustion engine; yes, it's 'nature's way' but it's hardly efficient or practical. Atomic power as a means of exceeding the speed of light went out with 1960s "Lost In Space"; science geeks like me would just laugh the idea right off of the screen. You might as well have the NX-01 run on coal for that matter....

I just assumed that Cochrane and his team also found a fast, cheap way to produce antimatter; maybe it was a development made to help earth bounce back from the post-atomic horror (maybe that development inspired his warp idea; much as weaponized rockets of WW2 inspired future lunar travel). Its very possible that an underground nuclear missile complex would also house a secret particle accelerator or some other heavy atomic industrial plant. Because his warp drive clearly operates with the same characteristics as later engines in the ST universe (the stretch/flash signature) the principles have to be same as well; matter/antimatter integration generating a subspace bubble around the ship to allow it to remain stationary as spacetime itself warps to allow it to reach point B a lot faster. That's been a precept of the show forever. Atomic power (even fusion) is a joke compared to the near 100% efficiency of a matter/antimatter yield. No self-respecting starship should be without it. ;)/>

*As much as I like First Contact, this is another example of being spoon-fed twenty-fourth century Star Trek in completely the wrong setting. I can forgive Riker for his twenty-fourth century lingo but there was so such thing as a warp core as we know it when the Phoenix launched.

A warp core doesn't have to be a giant stack to power the Phoenix's flight.

It may be only enough matter/antimatter integration for a VERY short test flight (the Phoenix was designed to break the warp barrier for a only a few minutes; not cruise on down to Proxima Centauri...).

Chuck Yeager's sound-breaking X-1 prototype couldn't fly to Paris, you know.... ;)/>

The Curiosity and Viking Mars probes both used miniaturized nuclear power plants that would fit easily in a car. But they couldn't power a nuclear aircraft carrier...

Another change - real-time communication with Earth. Get rid of it! This is a deep-space ship, a deep-space mission, yet Enterprise can maintain real-time contact with Starfleet when over a hundred light-years away. The Enterprise-D can't even do that half the time! All the blag about dropping subspace amplifiers, that doesn't solve it at all. Even the dialogue states they're only to "clear up reception a bit", and in the same conversation it's stated that Enterprise is a hundred light-years out. Very, very bad.

This I agree VERY much on.

Even on TOS, it took over three weeks to get a reply from Starfleet at the neutral zone (although curiously, Yeoman Rand delivers command's reply by the episode's end, which is only a day....).

Having real-time communication 'decreases' the daunting distance a bit too much, and makes it too '24th century' as you say. And besides, they only had a handful of subspace relays deployed! How COULD they have maintained such real-time (and clean) communications without the elaborate subspace networks of later ST? It'd be a bit like running today's sophisticated global electronics network using just the Telstar One satellite of the 1960s .... :dontgetit:/>

I'm just going to give the standard Treknobabble response and say "subspace". It solves everything. :laugh:

Impulse engines aren't exactly like rockets or ion drives, they are essentially smaller, less powerful warp engines. Dialogue in TNG, DS9 and the TNGTM both say the impulse engine creates a low-level subspace field, essentially a weak warp field, around the ship, essentially lowering its mass and allowing a conventional engine to drive it at much greater speeds.

I could just about cope with it if NX-01 had the first mobile M/AM reactor... but not if Earth had them from the outset. We need gigantic, miles-long particle accelerators to create minute quantities of antimatter, at the cost of hundreds of times the energy one would attain from annihilating it. I don't think it's reasonable to believe that fifty years from now, and a mere ten years after the near-destruction of humanity, that a cost-effective means of generating antimatter could be developed. I still believe a controlled detonation of the missile's existing warhead would have been enough for, as you say, a very short warp speed burst.

Again: subspace. It's the answer to everything! :D

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I don't think it's reasonable to believe that fifty years from now, and a mere ten years after the near-destruction of humanity, that a cost-effective means of generating antimatter could be developed.

50 years ago, we couldn't generate ANY antimatter... that's why it's called a 'breakthrough'. :P

I would actually have an easier time believing that a small scale (Phoenix-sized) warp reactor came first; then the larger scale industrial applications (or giant warp cores) came later...

Impulse engines aren't exactly like rockets or ion drives, they are essentially smaller, less powerful warp engines. Dialogue in TNG, DS9 and the TNGTM both say the impulse engine creates a low-level subspace field, essentially a weak warp field, around the ship, essentially lowering its mass and allowing a conventional engine to drive it at much greater speeds

Um.... not exactly (they generate a low-level subspace field, but they don't warp space-time).

From the wisdom that is the Oracle of Memory Alpha:

In Federation starships, the impulse drive was essentially an augmented fusion rocket, usually consisting of one or more fusion reactors, an accelerator-generator, adriver coil assembly, and a vectored thrust nozzle to direct the plasma exhaust. The fusion reaction generated a highly energized plasma. This plasma, ("electro-plasma") could be employed for propulsion, or could be diverted through the EPS to the power transfer grid, via EPS conduits, so as to supply other systems. The accelerated plasma was passed through the driver coils, thereby generating a subspace field which improved the propulsive effect.

This is the very definition of a nuclear rocket (like the abandoned NERVA project in the late 1960s; it was a nuclear rocket considered and tested for Mars travel. Budget cuts closed it down).

And the subspace field improved the propulsive (i.e. rocket-like) effect (decreasing the apparent mass of the vessel), but it was not sufficient to warp space....

Again: subspace. It's the answer to everything! :D

This is SOOOO true. :laugh:

Edited by Sehlat Vie

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Autocad   

Well, I was going to start my own thread, so I will chime in on this one.

it's a good sci-fi show, just not a good STAR TREK show"

Well, that about sizes it up. For the first time, I'm watching ENTERPRISE. The canon is blown out of the water, but as far as Sci-Fi goes, the stories (so far) are pretty good.

Give Travis an actual role to play instead of 'smiling guy at helm'

I did notice that.

base it more on TOS,
If I could pick ONE thing that TOS did better, it's the Phasers. Nothing like a phaser blast, and the man vaporizes!

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Scotty   

What would I change?

1. I would have made it the good ole Enterprise NCC 1701. Set it a few years before Kirk.

2. No Vulcan, but maybe a complete new alien.

3. Archer would've been Robert April in reference to TAS which seen him. Pike would have been first officer, he'd later take command.

4. The ship would look as advanced as the ship seen in TOS, not more advanced as the NX-01.

I'd keep the characters bit only change Archers name and T'Pol.

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Things to Change

1) Ease into it. Why suddenly warp out to the Klingon homeworld in the first episode? Why not have the crew confront space pirates in the solar system, or at least stay in the stellar neighborhood? Give the audience some idea of what the 22nd century on Earth looks like rather than putting the ship out in completely unexplored territory at the very beginning.

2) More character development for Hoshi and Mayweather. Mayweather's the most experienced spacer on the ship - why wouldn't he pull double-duty as a first-contact specialist or advisor? Then he and Hoshi would have had vital roles to play. As it was, Mayweather was pretty much the human shield for the rest of the crew (how many times did he get injured?), and Hoshi was the resident screamer.

3) I agree with other posters - dump the "photonic torpedoes" and "phase cannons." They're the less-cooler cousins to the kick-ass photon and quantum torpedoes.

4) More drama centered around ship life. You've got 80 people stuck together in a tin can - doesn't that cause any unforeseen problems in space exploration?

5) Dump the damn temporal cold war. The whole time-travel angle, with the Federation turning to temporal exploration in the 29th century, seemed like so much bulls---. It doesn't do anything for the story.

6) Stop trying to be cute by stuffing in veiled references to alien races and incidents that technically haven't happened yet. You want to meet the Ferengi, meet the damn Ferengi, and chalk the screwup about when the Federation had first contact with them to a clerical error. It's happened before, it can happen again.

Things to Keep

1) The tongue-in-cheek attitude - "You might want to recommend seatbelts for this thing" - Hoshi. "A poop question, Cap'n? We've got the fastest warp engine ever built, and I have to answer a poop question?" - Trip.

2) Some aspects of the tech - shuttlepods, grappling hooks, hull plating. It showed that this was a different time than we were used to. I was so happy that even though they created a working force field they didn't rush the technology into production for defending the ship.

3) The naivete of the crew exploring space - they played that well. This wasn't a crew that did everything right like we saw in TNG - they made mistakes and learned from those mistakes.

I'm not so worried about the technological differences - clearly, we live in a time with technology that is light-years beyond what they had in the TOS and TNG eras. Plus, societies change their attitudes toward technology by reviving old tech or incorporating past aesthetics of it into current technology. Enterprise may have been designed with flatscreens and lots of buttons and switches to make a statement that humanity had progressed technologically and socially. The NCC-1701 might just as well have been designed to reflect a more straightforward attitude toward technology - simpler, and built to last.

I'm not sure if a Romulan War season would have worked. Clearly, the writers were trying to incorporate elements of the continuity into their stories, and in TOS it was stated that the humans and Romulans never actually saw each other. The Aenar episodes had Archer and the Romulan Admiral dueling it out without ever actually seeing each other, but that kind of conflict would become stale if it lasted an entire season. Plus, it was so soon after the conclusion of DS9 and the Dominion War that it would have seemed like more of the same.

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Things to Change

1) Ease into it. Why suddenly warp out to the Klingon homeworld in the first episode? Why not have the crew confront space pirates in the solar system, or at least stay in the stellar neighborhood? Give the audience some idea of what the 22nd century on Earth looks like rather than putting the ship out in completely unexplored territory at the very beginning.

2) More character development for Hoshi and Mayweather. Mayweather's the most experienced spacer on the ship - why wouldn't he pull double-duty as a first-contact specialist or advisor? Then he and Hoshi would have had vital roles to play. As it was, Mayweather was pretty much the human shield for the rest of the crew (how many times did he get injured?), and Hoshi was the resident screamer.

3) I agree with other posters - dump the "photonic torpedoes" and "phase cannons." They're the less-cooler cousins to the kick-ass photon and quantum torpedoes.

4) More drama centered around ship life. You've got 80 people stuck together in a tin can - doesn't that cause any unforeseen problems in space exploration?

5) Dump the damn temporal cold war. The whole time-travel angle, with the Federation turning to temporal exploration in the 29th century, seemed like so much bulls---. It doesn't do anything for the story.

6) Stop trying to be cute by stuffing in veiled references to alien races and incidents that technically haven't happened yet. You want to meet the Ferengi, meet the damn Ferengi, and chalk the screwup about when the Federation had first contact with them to a clerical error. It's happened before, it can happen again.

Things to Keep

1) The tongue-in-cheek attitude - "You might want to recommend seatbelts for this thing" - Hoshi. "A poop question, Cap'n? We've got the fastest warp engine ever built, and I have to answer a poop question?" - Trip.

2) Some aspects of the tech - shuttlepods, grappling hooks, hull plating. It showed that this was a different time than we were used to. I was so happy that even though they created a working force field they didn't rush the technology into production for defending the ship.

3) The naivete of the crew exploring space - they played that well. This wasn't a crew that did everything right like we saw in TNG - they made mistakes and learned from those mistakes.

I'm not so worried about the technological differences - clearly, we live in a time with technology that is light-years beyond what they had in the TOS and TNG eras. Plus, societies change their attitudes toward technology by reviving old tech or incorporating past aesthetics of it into current technology. Enterprise may have been designed with flatscreens and lots of buttons and switches to make a statement that humanity had progressed technologically and socially. The NCC-1701 might just as well have been designed to reflect a more straightforward attitude toward technology - simpler, and built to last.

I'm not sure if a Romulan War season would have worked. Clearly, the writers were trying to incorporate elements of the continuity into their stories, and in TOS it was stated that the humans and Romulans never actually saw each other. The Aenar episodes had Archer and the Romulan Admiral dueling it out without ever actually seeing each other, but that kind of conflict would become stale if it lasted an entire season. Plus, it was so soon after the conclusion of DS9 and the Dominion War that it would have seemed like more of the same.

Pretty much agree with all of that.

And yes, I too, think that having the Romulan war early in the show would've been WAY too early.

I would've liked it if it were just hinted at by the very end. The RW presents certain problems; like "primitive" atomic weapons, and no visual contact (the Romulan War ENT books covered these points elegantly however).

And surely, an Enterprise that fought in the Romulan war would've graced the Enterprise E's wall of 'little ships'; which also bolsters my pet theory that the NX-01 timeline is an alternate timeline, just like the Abramsverse. It was created after the events of First Contact..

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Sim   

I agree with many of the ideas voiced above; especially making Travis a woman, giving Hoshi more responsibility (maybe not from the start, but continuously) and making Reed gay. Was high time for a gay character on Star Trek.

But my biggest problem with ENT is that it didn't live up to its premise until season 4. It was supposed to be a prequel telling prequel stories, but didn't do that at all (except for the Vulcan/Andorian episode once per season) in season 1 to 3. Instead of telling us how all the races we know from the 24th century had first contact and started working together, or the Romulan War, we got endless new "alien of the week" stories -- and heck, even an entirely new villain we had never heard of before was created with the Xindi. WTF. It seems Bermaga themselves didn't fully realize they weren't working on VOY season 8 to 10.

So what I'd change, most of all: Replace the Nazi 2-part episode in the beginning of season 4 with the pilot, skip everything between season 1 episode 3 and season 3 episode 24 (except maybe one or the other Andorian, Vulcan and Klingon episode) and make season 4 the series' first season.

Then continue the series in the same style as season 4 for a couple of seasons. Maybe William Shatner and/or Leonard Nimoy could have made guest appearances as Kirk's and Spock's ancestors or as mirror characters. Replace the Xindi war arc with the Romulan war arc. Show the first contact with races we know well in the 24th century, such as Trill, Betazoids or Deltans. Etc pp.

Oh, and I totally agree with these statements:

* I'd also eliminate the Xindi metaphor for the invasion of Iraq in S3.

It was a wet-dream testimonial to the failed policies of ex-president George W. Bush, who failed to find his precious WMDs in Iraq. It should not be glorified in ST. There was nothing "earth-threatening" about Iraq's military potential (unlike the Xindi). That war was based on a lie. The Xindi plot seemed like an excuse to justify it. I hate S3 not just for failed storytelling, but on general principle.

* Make Archer a bit less of an a$$h@le.

Too often, he comes off as blustery, smug and hostile; he's George W. Bush when he should be Jacques Cousteau.

Just hate season 3's Xindi arc exactly because of that reason.

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I would've liked it if it were just hinted at by the very end. The RW presents certain problems; like "primitive" atomic weapons, and no visual contact (the Romulan War ENT books covered these points elegantly however).

I'm looking forward to reading the RW novels - I have them, but nowadays I'm lucky if I have 15 minutes a day to read for fun...

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kenman   

- Hold off on the Klingons. I think about the Doctor Who Revival and how effectively they reintroduced the Daleks. They didn't plunge them into episode one, they waitied until about halfway through the season, introduced the race and showcased how scary they can be when it is just one of them, and then brought them in later with a whole giant force and it is a real threat. The Klingons in the pilot are just meh to me. Picard once made a comment to someone about how badly first contact with the Klingons went, and it lead to over a century of hostilities. I would've loved to see the Enterpirse crew attempt first contact and just really muck it up, do something deemed dishonorable and lead to long held hostilities.

- I would've loved more focus on the initial meetings with Andorians and Tellarites and the struggling relationship between humans and Vulcans, and just show how each goup has their own agendas and struggle to be friends, all a little mistrusting at first...and see them slowly build strong bonds that are then forged when the Earth-Romulan War breaks out, as mentioned in Balance of Terror. I'd much rather had seen an Earth-Romulan War than a Xindi War. Particularly since they spent a good chunk of time anyhow with the Enterprise not knowing what the Xindi looked like. I think slowly rolling out the introductions of classic races, and then really delving into what makes each race tick, much like the 24th Century series all did with Klingons, Cardassians, Ferengis, etc. TOS never did much to explain the backgrounds of Andorians or Tellarites, spend time getting to know them.

-No Ferengi or Borg. They were met in the 24th century, and both had been exposed enough in earlier shows. We have plenty of races to explore the earliest encounters with and delve into the background of, lets not drag out races that don't need further expansion on.

-Drop the temporal cold war, a silly idea that was even more silly whenever it was revisited. It went nowhere in the end anyhow, so I'd just drop it.

- I also would've loved a more submarine like atmopshere on the NX-01, and no viewscreen communications with other races. There should've been more limitations with what the ship could do with alien races. I also would've loved the the Enterpise of the series to look less like it did, and much more radical, like the one seen in the sketch in the Motion Picture...like this! I think that would've given the show more of it's own Identity, but the NX-01 is just not a very exciting design in my opinion.

In many ways I just wish the first few years had been more like Season 4, attempting to show the pioneering spirit of this early crew, and give a brand new introduction to classic races like Andorians and Tellarites, Klingons and Romulans...and really explore them more than they had been in the Original Series or any of the other spin-offs.

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My main beef with "Enterprise" was the overall design of it, because everything was far too advanced for the time period it supposedly took place in. People tried to brush that aside, saying some future war would set the Federation back by a century, and explain the technological difference...but I was already done by that point. I like Scott Bakula as an actor, and thought a show set about 50 years after "First Contact" would've been interesting...but the result just didn't fit. The trilogy story with Brent Spiner as Dr. Arik Soong was cool, but I could never make myself watch the rest of them.

Edited by Moviefan2k4

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My main beef with "Enterprise" was the overall design of it, because everything was far too advanced for the time period it supposedly took place in. People tried to brush that aside, saying some future war would set the Federation back by a century, and explain the technological difference...but I was already done by that point. I like Scott Bakula as an actor, and thought a show set about 50 years after "First Contact" would've been interesting...but the result just didn't fit. The trilogy story with Brent Spiner as Dr. Arik Soong was cool, but I could never make myself watch the rest of them.

Or maybe the overall design of it was more advanced than TOS', simply because TOS was a tv series filmed in the 60s and the design was outdated when ENT was filmed in the 2000s?

I never considered the production values of the series' "canon". Of course a 60s series looks different than a 00s series.

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My point was that such a drastic difference of style doesn't work for a prequel series; it shatters the suspension of disbelief, instead of supporting it.

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My point was that such a drastic difference of style doesn't work for a prequel series; it shatters the suspension of disbelief, instead of supporting it.

Yes and no.

I have my own head canon (which has never been refuted onscreen yet) that ENT (the entire series) is an alternate timeline that didn't exist before the movie "First Contact"; FC subtly changed the future by having 24th century 'help' assisting humanity's first warp flight, and Borg tech littering both Earth and Earth orbit.

The evidence:

* Before FC, there were six starships named Enterprise (see: "Trials and Tribble-ations"). Afterward? A mysterious new NX-01 suddenly turns up in history texts; it's the 7th starship Enterprise we 'never heard of.'

* No mention of Jonathan Archer before FC; suddenly (post 2001) he's has starships named after him (NEM).

* Cochrane telling his 'tall tales' about 'alien invaders' to a graduating class ("Regeneration"). What other 'secrets' of the future did he spill?

* Henry Archer; famed creator of the warp 5 engine. But was he supposed to be originally? Of the ground crew who were slaughtered by the random Borg attack from orbit, perhaps one of them were supposed to take his place or create a less advanced design of the W5 engine. Perhaps future Federation technology was advanced considerably when Henry Archer stepped forward to fill a historical vacancy left by the Borg attack of 2063. I could see the NX-class being the predecessor of ST09's Enterprise perhaps, but not TOS's version... that's a bit like the Dodge Viper preceding the Ford Pinto.

* Not to mention that Lily Sloan didn't fly in the Phoenix, as she was originally meant to; how did that seemingly important 'non-happening' affect future history?

* The earlier encounter with the Borg ("Regeneration") might've also advanced Starfleet technology a lot sooner than it was supposed to be; and the Suliban introduced cloaking technology about a hundred years earlier. Both of these events (spurred by the original 2063 divergence) also helped reinforced the alternate Jonathan Archer timeline.

* Perhaps the Federation is lucky that the divergence in 2063 was later 'healed' by the more canon-friendly events we see in S4...

Of course this is nothing more than my own head-canon, but I've seen nothing onscreen to truly contradict it either.

It also has the added benefit of making ENT more of an 'alternate timeline 'series (ala ST09) rather than another in a long line of mucked up prequels.... ;)

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If the studio came out with the explanation that ENT was an alternate history brought on by the events of First Contact, I would not argue with that. In fact, I think Sehlat's head canon makes perfect sense. ENT is canon to JJ Trek after all.

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If the studio came out with the explanation that ENT was an alternate history brought on by the events of First Contact, I would not argue with that. In fact, I think Sehlat's head canon makes perfect sense. ENT is canon to JJ Trek after all.

In my mind it kind of is.

It's a lot easier for me to believe that this...

NX-01bridge.jpg

...eventually led to THIS...

a40c7521e4a14200dbe7386c3a898e93.jpg

... rather than THIS:

thisideofparadise_348.jpg

Not to mention that Picard's (and the Borg's) interference in the 21st century timeline cannot be so easily dismissed; the fact that several key participants in the Phoenix project were killed, not to mention the Borg tech left behind both in orbit and on the surface. There had to be greater repercussions. Imagine if critical members of Werner von Braun's team were killed before they had a chance to work on the Saturn V rocket? Or if Amelia Earhart couldn't make her flight? Or if the remaining moonshots weren't canceled back in 1972? I imagine our overall timeline would be very similar but there would still be many differences if you looked closely enough...

I can more easily accept that ENT is simply an altered timeline that, by luck and circumstance, eventually re-segues with the TNG universe (though it probably offered a somewhat different version of the 23rd century than we saw in TOS; probably a bit more like ST09's 23rd century...).

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Bearded Spock established that there are at least 2 alternate time lines. Why not 3? It opens up more room for stories. Set a new series in one of the timelines and have one or two crossover eps per season.

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Bearded Spock established that there are at least 2 alternate time lines. Why not 3? It opens up more room for stories. Set a new series in one of the timelines and have one or two crossover eps per season.

TNG's "Parallels" also showed there was no limit on how many there could be...

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[

Of course this is nothing more than my own head-canon, but I've seen nothing onscreen to truly contradict it either.

"In a Mirror, Darkly, part II" - the database of USS Defiant NCC-1764 (a ship from the original original timeline) contains detailed historical and biographical records of Archer, the NX-01 and it's crew.

Rick Berman is also quoted on several occasions as affirming that Enterprise is not some alternate timeline but the interim period between the present and TOS (and the rest of Star Trek).

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[

Of course this is nothing more than my own head-canon, but I've seen nothing onscreen to truly contradict it either.

"In a Mirror, Darkly, part II" - the database of USS Defiant NCC-1764 (a ship from the original original timeline) contains detailed historical and biographical records of Archer, the NX-01 and it's crew.

Rick Berman is also quoted on several occasions as affirming that Enterprise is not some alternate timeline but the interim period between the present and TOS (and the rest of Star Trek).

That only proves that Archer only exists in the prime line. It doesn't prove that the Archer we see is Prime Archer.

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[

Of course this is nothing more than my own head-canon, but I've seen nothing onscreen to truly contradict it either.

"In a Mirror, Darkly, part II" - the database of USS Defiant NCC-1764 (a ship from the original original timeline) contains detailed historical and biographical records of Archer, the NX-01 and it's crew.

Rick Berman is also quoted on several occasions as affirming that Enterprise is not some alternate timeline but the interim period between the present and TOS (and the rest of Star Trek).

That only proves that Archer only exists in the prime line. It doesn't prove that the Archer we see is Prime Archer.

Or that there ever WAS a prime Archer... until the First Contact temporal incursion/violation.

The timelines at some future point (probably the early 23rd century) obviously 're-converged' again; but my 'head canon' (and that's all it is, but it works) tells me that for awhile (especially the mid-22nd century) there were massive disparities...

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[

Of course this is nothing more than my own head-canon, but I've seen nothing onscreen to truly contradict it either.

"In a Mirror, Darkly, part II" - the database of USS Defiant NCC-1764 (a ship from the original original timeline) contains detailed historical and biographical records of Archer, the NX-01 and it's crew.

Rick Berman is also quoted on several occasions as affirming that Enterprise is not some alternate timeline but the interim period between the present and TOS (and the rest of Star Trek).

That only proves that Archer only exists in the prime line. It doesn't prove that the Archer we see is Prime Archer.

Or that there ever WAS a prime Archer... until the First Contact temporal incursion/violation.

The timelines at some future point (probably the early 23rd century) obviously 're-converged' again; but my 'head canon' (and that's all it is, but it works) tells me that for awhile (especially the mid-22nd century) there were massive disparities...

There had to be an Archer in both universes but he didn't have to be Captain Archer. The NX-01 could have been a freighter in the prime line.

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