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Ultimately Human: 45th Anniversary Special Edition

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HAPPY 45th ANNIVERSARY STAR TREK!

45 years ago on this date, September 8 1966, the original Star Trek television series premiered. It was a low-budget, sometimes campy, space adventure described by it's creator as 'wagon train' to the stars. Or so it seemed on the surface. Once you looked deeper though, you found much more. Which is why 45 years later, so many people still remember Star Trek and still watch it with an almost religious fervor. It's become a part of our culture, and for all of us, a part of our daily lives.

Today, I wanted to specifically honor the original series. More specifically, the men and women who played their parts in making the show what it was. Most of them in front of the camera; a few behind it. Some of them as series regulars, others as one-off guest stars who made an impact. So I went about doing something a little unique for the September 2011 edition of 'Ultimately Human' and created our first and (to date) only themed edition. A 45th Anniversary Special Edition, presented in classic 'black and white' photographs for an extra touch of something... unique.

Enjoy!

http://www.trekcore.com/specials/thumbnails.php?album=110

The Players

Deforest Kelley as Doctor Leonard H. 'Bones' McCoy

Diana Muldaur as Ann Mulhall / Dr. Miranda Jones

Gene Roddenberry, the Great Bird of the Galaxy

George Takei as Lieutenant Hikaru Sulu

Grace Lee Whitney as Yeoman Janice Rand

James Doohan as Lt. Cmdr. Montgomery 'Scotty' Scott

Jeffrey Hunter as Captain Christopher Pike in 'The Cage'

John Colicos as the Klingon Captain Kor

Leonard Nimoy as Science Officer Spock

Majel Barrett as Number One / Nurse Christine Chapel

Mark Lenard as Romulan Commander / Ambassador Sarek

Nichelle Nichols as Lieutenant Nyota Uhura

Ricardo Montalban as Khan Noonien Singh

Robert H. 'Bob' Justman, Associate Producer / Co-Producer

Susan Oliver as Vina in 'The Cage'

Walter Koenig as Ensign Pavel Chekov

Walter 'Matt' Jefferies, Series Production Designer

and finally,

William Shatner as Captain James Tiberius Kirk

Which Ones Are Your Favorites & Why?

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Long time lurker. I just had to say, these are really great. A lot of genuinely handsome people.

Since I'm supposed to pick one, I'd have to say Majel. I now understand why Gene couldn't say no.

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These black and white photos look absolutely beautiful! My favourites are of DeForest, Gene, George, Majel, and Nichelle.

I didn't know that Shatner used to smoke, or is that just for the photo shoot?

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Those are great pics!

Edited by JayTheTrekkie

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My favourite one is of Leonard Nimoy, because I had no idea he ever had a mustache.

Edited by Dillkid

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Diana Muldaur, striking.

Mark Lenard, legend.

and of course, John Colicos.

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The pics of Muldaur and Kelly are simply stunning.

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Long time lurker. I just had to say, these are really great. A lot of genuinely handsome people.

Since I'm supposed to pick one, I'd have to say Majel. I now understand why Gene couldn't say no.

When I found that photo, I was awe-struck. Not just by how pretty she was, but by the fact I found such in the first place. It's very tough to find pictures of some folks. Before UH came along, you could search the entire internet and find less than a handful of photos of DeForest Kelley that where professional photos of him and larger than thumbnails. Majel was even rare-er.

These black and white photos look absolutely beautiful! My favourites are of DeForest, Gene, George, Majel, and Nichelle.

I didn't know that Shatner used to smoke, or is that just for the photo shoot?

Pretty much everyone smoked back then. There are pictures of Shatner and Kelley lighting up in costume back-stage. Have a photo of Jimmy Doohan holding a cigarette in Scotty uniform at a party. Nimoy, Gene... only ones I'm not certain of smoker status are Sulu, Chekov and Uhura.

My favourite one is of Leonard Nimoy, because I had know idea he ever had a mustache.

I've got more photos of a mustached Nimoy in future editions, hehe. It was the 80s! ;)

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These black and white photos look absolutely beautiful! My favourites are of DeForest, Gene, George, Majel, and Nichelle.

I didn't know that Shatner used to smoke, or is that just for the photo shoot?

Pretty much everyone smoked back then. There are pictures of Shatner and Kelley lighting up in costume back-stage. Have a photo of Jimmy Doohan holding a cigarette in Scotty uniform at a party. Nimoy, Gene... only ones I'm not certain of smoker status are Sulu, Chekov and Uhura.

I don't believe Nichelle Nichols was ever a smoker - at least she does not mention it in her biography.

My favourite one is of Leonard Nimoy, because I had know idea he ever had a mustache.

I've got more photos of a mustached Nimoy in future editions, hehe. It was the 80s! ;)

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Shatner had a heck of a tache in SeaQuest if I remember.

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Whenever Shatner's had a stache, it's clearly been fake. LOL. He had such a number of times in the early 90s, but it was so obviously fake as hell, lol.

Re: Nichelle smoking

I don't think Shatner, Nimoy, or anyone really specifically mentions such. It's more something I've learned from photographs and the generational thing. A massive majority of people smoked back then. I don't have specific numbers, but it was really really super common back in the day. Virtually anyone who served in WW2 smoked -- maybe 10% didn't. And such continued pretty much into the 70s before it began to taper off. Hell, my dad smoked when I was little, and my grandmother smoked until a year or so before she died of Lung Cancer. She would light up with the oxygen tube running into her nose in the late 90s. LOL.

I'm honestly amazed at the fact only 20% of people smoke in this day and age. Amazed and pleased. And questioning of the sanity of those 20%! LOL. But back 15-20 years ago? I think the numbers where still up in the 40%+ range into the 1990s in the states. I think it's still more common in Europe (?)

As I recall, Nimoy was also a bit of an alcoholic into the 70s. I think he's spoken of drinking too much in one of his books. I know Jimmy Doohan was a big drinker too into the 90s or so.

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Whenever Shatner's had a stache, it's clearly been fake. LOL. He had such a number of times in the early 90s, but it was so obviously fake as hell, lol.

Re: Nichelle smoking

I don't think Shatner, Nimoy, or anyone really specifically mentions such. It's more something I've learned from photographs and the generational thing. A massive majority of people smoked back then. I don't have specific numbers, but it was really really super common back in the day. Virtually anyone who served in WW2 smoked -- maybe 10% didn't. And such continued pretty much into the 70s before it began to taper off. Hell, my dad smoked when I was little, and my grandmother smoked until a year or so before she died of Lung Cancer. She would light up with the oxygen tube running into her nose in the late 90s. LOL.

I'm honestly amazed at the fact only 20% of people smoke in this day and age. Amazed and pleased. And questioning of the sanity of those 20%! LOL. But back 15-20 years ago? I think the numbers where still up in the 40%+ range into the 1990s in the states. I think it's still more common in Europe (?)

As I recall, Nimoy was also a bit of an alcoholic into the 70s. I think he's spoken of drinking too much in one of his books. I know Jimmy Doohan was a big drinker too into the 90s or so.

I know people that have smoked since they were around 11 years old, so it probably is more common in Europe. I never have and never will touch a cigarette, I find it disgusting to be honest. But back then when the TOS cast were doing it, it was a different generation as you said. I guess it was just fashionable to light one up every 20 minutes :confused:

Edited by Dillkid

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Whenever Shatner's had a stache, it's clearly been fake. LOL. He had such a number of times in the early 90s, but it was so obviously fake as hell, lol.

Re: Nichelle smoking

I don't think Shatner, Nimoy, or anyone really specifically mentions such. It's more something I've learned from photographs and the generational thing. A massive majority of people smoked back then. I don't have specific numbers, but it was really really super common back in the day. Virtually anyone who served in WW2 smoked -- maybe 10% didn't. And such continued pretty much into the 70s before it began to taper off. Hell, my dad smoked when I was little, and my grandmother smoked until a year or so before she died of Lung Cancer. She would light up with the oxygen tube running into her nose in the late 90s. LOL.

I'm honestly amazed at the fact only 20% of people smoke in this day and age. Amazed and pleased. And questioning of the sanity of those 20%! LOL. But back 15-20 years ago? I think the numbers where still up in the 40%+ range into the 1990s in the states. I think it's still more common in Europe (?)

As I recall, Nimoy was also a bit of an alcoholic into the 70s. I think he's spoken of drinking too much in one of his books. I know Jimmy Doohan was a big drinker too into the 90s or so.

It feels like a lot more than 20%. Wherever I go, I can't help but find someone smoking nearby.

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Well, I meant 20% in the US. Like I said, I imagine the numbers quite higher in Europe. You folks seem to do a lot of things smarter than us, but giving up smoking is one of the few we have up on you, lol.

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I wish we could just ban smoking all together. The only reason they haven't is because they get so much money on tax.

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Well, there's also the lesson learned from U.S. prohibition.

Outright banning of things, any things, really never works. And when tried, it simply leads to a massive increase of illegal activity, which can also lead to violence and other things. If we tried to ban smoking it would simply make it something for people to rebel against. A lesson I wish the U.S. Government understood when it came to drug policy, because as much illegal activity and violence as prohibition caused for a decade in the 1920s, it's done a hundred-fold in the past 40-odd years of the 'war on drugs' -- and the violence aspect has gotten to the point of near war-fare in the case of Mexico, thanks in large part to our failed laws.

No, the way the U.S. has handled smoking is a testament to the fact that people can be educated and learn things are bad for them and choose to avoid them. There has been a massive education propaganda program in the states over the last 20 years on the ills of smoking and it's had a fairly significant effect. And the past decade has seen a huge swath of local and state legislation enacted to bar smoking in specific locations and circumstances which have also been very successful and beneficial to the overall anti-smoking cause.

If the European nations would do such, I'm sure they could see similar if not more significant results.

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Well, there's also the lesson learned from U.S. prohibition.

Outright banning of things, any things, really never works. And when tried, it simply leads to a massive increase of illegal activity, which can also lead to violence and other things. If we tried to ban smoking it would simply make it something for people to rebel against. A lesson I wish the U.S. Government understood when it came to drug policy, because as much illegal activity and violence as prohibition caused for a decade in the 1920s, it's done a hundred-fold in the past 40-odd years of the 'war on drugs' -- and the violence aspect has gotten to the point of near war-fare in the case of Mexico, thanks in large part to our failed laws.

No, the way the U.S. has handled smoking is a testament to the fact that people can be educated and learn things are bad for them and choose to avoid them. There has been a massive education propaganda program in the states over the last 20 years on the ills of smoking and it's had a fairly significant effect. And the past decade has seen a huge swath of local and state legislation enacted to bar smoking in specific locations and circumstances which have also been very successful and beneficial to the overall anti-smoking cause.

If the European nations would do such, I'm sure they could see similar if not more significant results.

In Britain, It's been illegal to smoke in places like pubs/restaurants (That used to allow you to) since 2008, so hopefully the amount of people doing it will go down in the next 16/17 years. But kids are still doing it at school, the teachers tell them off, and find them doing it in the exact same place the next day. Not only are people around my age not educated enough on the dangers of smoking, but in alot of cases they have no reason to stop.

Edited by Dillkid

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A lot of teenagers still smoke here in the states too, but somehow or another, the majority of them stop as they get older or in a relationship or have kids. I know people who smoked when we where in HS, and have since stopped for such reasons. It's really come to be seen as a dirty thing to do; and not in the 'good' way such might have been 20 years ago. The health risks have just become so apparent and people so educated on, and the "ick" factor such, that it becomes harder and harder to be socially accepted if you smoke. One of the biggest reasons guys I know have stopped smoking is that a great many gals won't get into or stay in a relationship with a guy who smokes, and frankly to pretty much every guy in their 20s there is one thing way more important than even a crippling chemical addiction like smoking. :giggle:

Seems to be one of the good applications of peer pressure, the anti-smoking thing.

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Well, there's also the lesson learned from U.S. prohibition.

Outright banning of things, any things, really never works. And when tried, it simply leads to a massive increase of illegal activity, which can also lead to violence and other things. If we tried to ban smoking it would simply make it something for people to rebel against. A lesson I wish the U.S. Government understood when it came to drug policy, because as much illegal activity and violence as prohibition caused for a decade in the 1920s, it's done a hundred-fold in the past 40-odd years of the 'war on drugs' -- and the violence aspect has gotten to the point of near war-fare in the case of Mexico, thanks in large part to our failed laws.

No, the way the U.S. has handled smoking is a testament to the fact that people can be educated and learn things are bad for them and choose to avoid them. There has been a massive education propaganda program in the states over the last 20 years on the ills of smoking and it's had a fairly significant effect. And the past decade has seen a huge swath of local and state legislation enacted to bar smoking in specific locations and circumstances which have also been very successful and beneficial to the overall anti-smoking cause.

If the European nations would do such, I'm sure they could see similar if not more significant results.

In Britain, It's been illegal to smoke in places like pubs/restaurants (That used to allow you to) since 2008, so hopefully the amount of people doing it will go down in the next 16/17 years. But kids are still doing it at school, the teachers tell them off, and find them doing it in the exact same place the next day. Not only are people around my age not educated enough on the dangers of smoking, but in alot of cases they have no reason to stop.

I don't know how you can be informed any more clearly of the dangers than having 'SMOKING KILLS' in big letters labelled on the front of the packet.

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Well, there's also the lesson learned from U.S. prohibition.

Outright banning of things, any things, really never works. And when tried, it simply leads to a massive increase of illegal activity, which can also lead to violence and other things. If we tried to ban smoking it would simply make it something for people to rebel against. A lesson I wish the U.S. Government understood when it came to drug policy, because as much illegal activity and violence as prohibition caused for a decade in the 1920s, it's done a hundred-fold in the past 40-odd years of the 'war on drugs' -- and the violence aspect has gotten to the point of near war-fare in the case of Mexico, thanks in large part to our failed laws.

No, the way the U.S. has handled smoking is a testament to the fact that people can be educated and learn things are bad for them and choose to avoid them. There has been a massive education propaganda program in the states over the last 20 years on the ills of smoking and it's had a fairly significant effect. And the past decade has seen a huge swath of local and state legislation enacted to bar smoking in specific locations and circumstances which have also been very successful and beneficial to the overall anti-smoking cause.

If the European nations would do such, I'm sure they could see similar if not more significant results.

In Britain, It's been illegal to smoke in places like pubs/restaurants (That used to allow you to) since 2008, so hopefully the amount of people doing it will go down in the next 16/17 years. But kids are still doing it at school, the teachers tell them off, and find them doing it in the exact same place the next day. Not only are people around my age not educated enough on the dangers of smoking, but in alot of cases they have no reason to stop.

I don't know how you can be informed any more clearly of the dangers than having 'SMOKING KILLS' in big letters labelled on the front of the packet.

True. Some of them just simply don't care though, and rather look like what they think is cool infront of their mates.

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Trouble is, most teenagers think they're immortal. Telling them that they'll likely die from lung cancer in the next 25-50 years unless they quit is going to have little or no effect on someone who thinks smoking makes them look cool. It's different if someone they have a crush on tells them "no thanks, I don't kiss ashtrays". It's the same with alcohol. Telling a teen drinking too much will kill their brain cells won't help. Knowing someone who's been robbed or assaulted while drunk and unable to defend themselves might make them think twice.

Most EU countries have banned smoking in public places such as pubs and clubs. Many employers have banned smoking on company time too. Even in the 1980s it was not unheard of for teachers to smoke in class in front of the kids, at least in France.

Back on topic...

Kelley, Nimoy, Shatner and Nichols are my favorites...

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Shatner had a heck of a tache in SeaQuest if I remember.

that he did. An absolute beast of one rivalling his tache in National Lampoon's Loaded Weapon 1.

Though the goatee in American Psycho II was something else.

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