Favorite Overall Trek Series/Movie  

206 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your overall favorite Star Trek series?

    • Star Trek: Enterprise
      16
    • Star Trek: The Original Series
      51
    • Star Trek: The Animated Series
      0
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation
      55
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
      50
    • Star Trek: Voyager
      34
  2. 2. What is your overall favorite Star Trek movie?

    • Star Trek - I: The Motion Picture
      10
    • Star Trek - II: The Wrath of Khan
      41
    • Star Trek - III: The Search for Spock
      7
    • Star Trek - IV: The Voyage Home
      22
    • Star Trek - V: The Final Frontier
      4
    • Star Trek - VI: The Undiscovered Country
      29
    • Star Trek - VII: Generations
      11
    • Star Trek - VIII: First Contact
      64
    • Star Trek - IX: Insurrection
      7
    • Star Trek - X: Nemesis
      11


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I can't believe I didn't put up a poll for my favourite film! I was looking for the thread and couldn't find it anywhere, so I must have forgotten to put it up.

Anyway, how would you rate Generations? I just watched it again last night to see if it was still my top film, and it is. I give it a 10.

I do have a couple of questions though.

1. Since the Enterprise B saved the El-Aurins when they were fleeing from the Borg, shouldn't they have found out about the Borg at that point instead of in TNG? Wouldn't the El-Aurins have said who destroyed their homeworld?

2. Why could Lursor and Be'Tor (sp?) see normally through Geordi's VISOR? When Picard and was seeing through Geordi's VISOR in TNG, he saw how Geordi saw things.

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I gave it an 8. The Enterprise-B is gorgeous and didn't get nearly enough screen time.

In answer to your questions, Voyager:

1. In VOY: Scorpion, part I, Janeway is looking at a classified Starfleet database on the Borg. At the top it reads "9521.6", the stardate of The Undiscovered Country - about the time when El-Aurians came to the Federation. It's not direct evidence but it's a pretty logical conclusion.

2. Lursa and B'Etor (as far as I know) and I'm not sure... maybe they just put a mini camera inside it? :giggle:

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I also gave it an 8. Its my favorite film after First Contact.

Well, he answered your first question easily enough, as for the second... I'm guessing that they did it that way to go with the flow of the movie. It wouldn't have appealed to audiences to see colored, fuzzy shapes during that whole sequance.

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This was the first Trek film I saw in theaters, so of course it has a special place in my heart. I specifically remember, though, upon seeing Kirk take up screentime in the beginning, and little five-year old me wondering, "Who is this old, fat guy? And why is he in my Star Trek movie?" :giggle:

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You were 5 when Generations released? :huh2: I thought you were older than that. Wow. lol

Well, let's see...born in '89, Generations came out in '94...so that makes five. Yup! :happy:

I was a little TNG'er. :P I had no idea who Captain Kirk was at that point in my life.

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The years have flown by, haven't they? I didn't realize that it had come out so long ago. Makes you wonder where all the time went to.

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:laugh: That means I was 10 at the time.

A great movie, fantastic crossover between the generations and we have Malcolm McDowell playing another fantastic villain :)

9

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I gave it an 8. The Enterprise-B is gorgeous and didn't get nearly enough screen time.

In answer to your questions, Voyager:

1. In VOY: Scorpion, part I, Janeway is looking at a classified Starfleet database on the Borg. At the top it reads "9521.6", the stardate of The Undiscovered Country - about the time when El-Aurians came to the Federation. It's not direct evidence but it's a pretty logical conclusion.

2. Lursa and B'Etor (as far as I know) and I'm not sure... maybe they just put a mini camera inside it? :giggle:

Thanks, and I agree, the Ent-B does not have enough time!

Just another question. How long after 'All Good Things' is the movie set?

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One year - stardate 48650.1 (given in the script at the end of the film, I couldn't remember the date spoken about halfway through lol) which puts in halfway through 2371, a few months after Voyager disappeared. TNG: All Good Things... was in late 2370.

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Shouldn't Worf have been on DS9 by then? Or was that just before.

It was a few months before. The Enterprise was lost and Worf took a leave of absence to go to Boreth which lasted until Sisko requested his presence in 'Way of the Warrior' ;)

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Here's a run down when Generation took place and when Voyager got lost and also when Worf joined the DS9 crew.

TNG Season 7, All Good Things... Stardate: 47988 (December 27, 2370)

Voyager season 1, Caretaker: Stardate: 48315.6 (April 26, 2371)

Stardate for Generations was Stardate 48632.4 (August 19, 2371)

Deep Space Nine season 4, when Worf joined DS9 at end of Way of the Warrior part 2: 49011.4 (January 5, 2372)

The movie took place 8 months after All Good Things.

Voyager got lost in the Delta Quadrant 4 months after All Good Things... and 4 months before Generations.

Worf came on Deep Space Nine in Way of the Warrior and joined the crew 5 months after the destruction of the Enterprise D.

Edited by JayTheTrekkie

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In regards to Kirk's death, I didn't care for it at all. I get that he was sacrificing himself by making a difference, but it sort of robs something of his character that he didn't die on board a starship, particularly an Enterprise. If they had just left him dead on the Enterprise-B, it might have carried a bit more weight.

I also don't like that his death in Generations robs Star Trek V of one of the best character moments of the film. While most if not all of the story of V is rubbish, the character moments between Kirk, Spock, and Bones nearly hold up the entire film on their own. The scene I'm referring to, is at the beginning when Kirk says that he's always known he'll die alone.

In Generations, when he finally does bite the dust, Picard is with him....if they had just left him dead on the Ent-B, it would have been fine, because he was alone, without Spock or Bones anywhere to be seen. Granted they weren't there either when he does die at the end of Generations, though I suppose you could argue that Spock is there in spirit because he's mind meld'ed with Picard, but that's sort of going out on a limb I think and Picard being there himself is enough to make his statement from The Final Frontier invalid.

The whole thing just rubs me the wrong way.

Aside from that though, I quite like Generations. Like Happy Russia, Generations was the first Star Trek film I saw in a theater. Not sure why I hadn't seen any of the others in the theater though. The story is solid, the big-D was meant to be seen on the big screen, the Enterprise-B became my preferred type of Excelsior class, it was funny, the story cared about the characters and how awesome was the saucer landing the first time you saw it. It doesn't get much cooler then that, expect for maybe seeing the Defiant taking on the Borg for the first time.

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I think the way Kirk died could have been done better, but I actually like the fact that he died. It's not because I don't like Kirk, but because it brings a conclusion to the legendary captain. Rather than him continuing his life and us not knowing what he did after that, we see his final moments.

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I think Ron D Moore had the right reasons for killing him off; that this very Human captain has done everything a Human can - except die. I think it was good that they brought his character full circle, if you will.

And the way he died was better than in the original sript - getting shot in the back by Soran. :thumbdown:

Edited by GenesisDevice

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Yeah this might be my favorite movie. Definitly a 10 and I loved the way that the two captains from different times met and worked together. One of my favorite scenes was when the enterprise crash-landed on the planet, and the aftermath like spot and the family album.

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That saucer crash had to be ILM's greatest single special effect I've ever seen. Funk their CGI effects, etc, in all their future films (including the amazing effects in First Contact and XI). The saucer crash was just so realistic, everything--the model, the ground effects, the crackling thunder-like sound it made when it came out of the sky.... Just a perfect effects sequence right there. Goosebumps every time!

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I gave it an 8. I agree with Voyager and GenesisDevice about Kirk's death. Overall it was a very good movie, it just doesn't happen to be one of my personal favorites.

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