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Mr.Picard

Homeward

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Episode name: "Homeward"

Season: 7

Director: Alexander Singer

Worf's adoptive brother violates the Prime Directive by saving a group of villagers from a doomed planet. (Memory Alpha)

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Ugh. Yet another 'season 7 family' episode. Sigh. *lol* I don't really care much for Worf's adoptive brother, really. I get it that he wants to save these people, but really... he's very selfish and expects others to clean up his mess.

I do admit that the episode is perfect for Prime Directive speculations and musings, though. It's just not one of my favorites somehow.

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This was a pretty good episode but not a favorite episode.

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I didn't like it, either.

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I liked this episode; I think it was about time that we saw Worf's foster brother. Although the whole getting beamed and not noticing was a bit hard to believe. Especially when you're supposed to be able to feel it.

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Indeed, not feeling the transporter is a bit odd to say the least. I liked seeing Worf's foster brother, though. However, nowhere near my favorite TNG ep.

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I saw the last half hour of this tonight- FAIL on so many levels.

HOW DID WORF'S BROTHER BEAM ALL THOSE PEOPLE ONTO THE HOLODECK? I thought they didn't have any modern technology! It's stretching even "Trek Plausibility" that a person could have got away with this unnoticed. And that so many people could have been fooled for so long.

The prime directive again rears it's ugly head. This is the one aspect of post-O.S. Trek that always struck me as incomprehensible to respect. It was all about how Star fleet could appear to be goody-goody and morally superior when in reality it was about finding a rational to avoid having to get involved with races that could not benefit them in some way. Yes, that's how it works no matter how some people will cry otherwise.

I missed some of the details about why the alien race couldn't be let in on things. I know one of them got out of the holodeck in which case the truth of the matter should have come out since the stupid rule was broken anyway. And then he apparently committed suicide and that STUPID so-called doctor said "he would have died anyway." HOW DOES SHE KNOW- SHE DOESN'T! She even admitted she couldn't wipe his memory because of his brain being too different to do it (words to that effect). I wonder if Gates McFadden ever questioned the writers about why they gave her such awful lines.

No one bothered to mention to him that all he needed to do was point up at the night sky and his people would have believed him and accepted the reality.

A total insult to the intelligence.

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So-called doctor indeed... it's another occasion where we get to see her strange sense of medical ethics. She applies human ethics, values and standards on pretty much every alien species she encounters. She never even once tries to see it through THEIR eyes, she only sees her own point of view and her own sense of medial ethics, regardless of what sort of alien culture she has in front of her. Poor Gates McFadden indeed. She did complain about the treatment of her character more than once, but no one was willing to listen. (You have to keep in mind that most of the writers were male and had no idea how to write a decent female character who was not overly stereotypical. They managed to partially save Troi, but the Redhead Of Doom was mostly either completely lost in insignificance or got stinker episodes like "Sub Rosa".) At least the writers were consistent with her blatant xenophobic and ignorant tendencies - I'm not sure if this is a good thing, though...

As for "Homeward" - Nikolai could beam them aboard... he was aboard the Enterprise and then rigged the transporters, I believe. (He did attend Starfleet Academy with Worf for a short time, so I assume he knows his way around transporter technobabble.) I also don't think it's very plausible for the poor people to not notice that they were beamed somewhere else, though. I mean really, recreating their world COMPLETELY, every single nuance, every stone right where it was? Not very convincing. They weren't THAT stupid.

I am one of those who "cry otherwise", I am a strong supporter of the Prime Directive, although it certainly has an ugly and negative aspect that we get to see in this case, I agree on that. It's insanely cruel to stand by and watch a planet die. It's the downside of the whole issue, and there are people in the 24th century who oppose the Prime Directive (such as Nikolai). I still think that, under the circumstances, it is the 'best' thing to come up with, and I don't think it was made as an excuse so that they wouldn't have to bother with non-warp civilizations. One single starship cannot save an entire planet's population, and putting a captain into the position of having to decide who lives and who dies is something that no single person could handle alone. The poor people would not last long as commanding officers, they'd be wrecks in no time. Oh and the Prime Directive did exist in TOS as well - Kirk just mostly chose to simply ignore it and to contaminate quite a few alien cultures, that's all. He tended to just wave his hand and say "these people need our help and are not free" and then the episode went on.

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Oh and the Prime Directive did exist in TOS as well - Kirk just mostly chose to simply ignore it and to contaminate quite a few alien cultures, that's all. He tended to just wave his hand and say "these people need our help and are not free" and then the episode went on.

Regardless of whether the people were happy and smiling and enjoying their lovely, simple lives where they didn't have to do anything thanks to the all-providing computer. That's not liberation, that's imposition... ahem. :)

I remember this one vaguely. It's okay, but nothing special. Worf's brother irritated me. :P

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thanks for the explanation Mrs. P.

There's just so much wrong with the episode.

I won't debate on the P.D. other than to say it would not be the captain's decision to say who lives or who dies- if they were in the position to help at all they would simply help- it would be the responsibility of the people who were in danger to figure that out. Rather like at sea: if a ship answers a distress call and finds survivors on a ship they would take whoever was sent over- not choose who they would accept.

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Meh, I didn't care that much for this episode. 6

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I really like this episode, it reminds me a little of of 'Who Watches The Watchers' from Season 3. I really liked the part where came up with the 'LaForge Omen', great stuff. 7 out of 10.

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The suicide of the villager that escaped the holodeck bothered me. It seemed to me that he shouldn't have had the opportunity to be alone, and they should have predicted his fragile mental state. His death was just an excuse to say 'See, that's what happens when you violate the Prime Directive'. It was just more moralistic garbage that was bogging the series down by season 7. There were a few occasions where Picard would rather watch a species go extinct rather than go against the Prime Directive. 'Pen Pals' comes to mind... I guess if they aren't warp-capable, they aren't worth saving? I think Prime Directive should have been more tuned towards preventing Federation members impersonating gods or selling advanced technology or weapons to less advanced societies. Imminent destruction of a planets entire population should be an exception, protocol should be broken in emergency situations only, but contact should be kept as minimal as possible even in those situations.

Yet another episode where Beverly sits on her hands and can't do anything. When it was Dr Pulaski on the show, she was always saving the day like she was a wannabe McCoy or something and had tricks up her sleeve. With Beverly, it's always " I can't do it, there's nothing I can do, their physiology is too different " etc.

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Interesting concept (a violation of the prime directive via the holodeck; so interesting that "Insurrection" would steal it four years later....), but making the antagonist Worf's half-brother was just stupid soap opera. Season 7 was the 'relatives-in-the-closet' season and this episode made me think many of those relatives should've STAYED in the closet. Worf's brother was a selfish pr!ck. The only reason he wanted to 'save' this culture and risk violating the PD was that he knocked up an alien woman. Plain and simple. A non-sympathetic character, and not particularly well-acted, either (and I used to love Paul Sorvino's other work in movies and TV). Shame; he brought little to the table in this episode. And a portly, fiftysomething man trying to do martial arts moves just looks silly... I'm a portly fortysomething and it was embarrassing to watch.

And taking off Worf's headpiece was kind of 'mojo-robbing.' It was a bit like peeking under the curtain. I was also led to believe that the cranial ridges were extensions of the Klingon's spinal cords. Wouldn't it do permanent damage to cosmetically 'remove' a part of your spinal cord?!? Just saying... that last point is a bit of nerdiness that is probably easily explained somehow, but I still don't care; Worf without the 'turtlehead' was just not Worf (he looked like an actor just doing a deep voice at that point....).

And Crusher (as usual) proves to be an incompetent dope. If they used money in the 24th century, she would SERIOUSLY need to update her malpractice insurance every year...

And one more ethical question; how could Worf's brother (Nikolai) go on in a relationship (and even father a child) with an 'ignorant' native woman when his whole life with her is based on a LIE?!? How is that in ANY way a good conclusion to this episode? The moral seems to be 'keep the ignorant cultures in darkness for their own good... but please; continue to have sex with them as often as you like." :S

You'd think the "chariots of the gods" would come with some kind of birth control.... :thumbdown:

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And Crusher (as usual) proves to be an incompetent dope. If they used money in the 24th century, she would SERIOUSLY need to update her malpractice insurance every year...

This made me LOL. Literally. I agree wholeheartedly, of course.

I also agree about season 7 bringing too many "family members we might have heard of but don't really want to see for an entire episode" plots. Honestly, they did this with almost every single main cast member and it was just riduculous and the episodes bore me to tears mostly.

I also never understood what was so great about Nikolai basing his entire relationship and marriage on that kind of lie, but he DOES seem to be the kind of character who has no moral obligations whatsoever to something like this. He probably didn't even consider that this MIGHT be a problem for everyone but HIM.

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And Crusher (as usual) proves to be an incompetent dope. If they used money in the 24th century, she would SERIOUSLY need to update her malpractice insurance every year...

This made me LOL. Literally. I agree wholeheartedly, of course.

You and I are totally on the same page about Crusher; to quote Joe Pesci in Casino, "(She'd) f**k up a cup of coffee...." :laugh:

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That... woman is number two on my 'most hated TNG characters' list. By a tiny, tiny margin, number one on that list is Vash, but then, SHE appears in only TWO episodes while Crusher's mere presence annoys the hell out of me in six whole seasons. Oh God, no. The writers are to blame for this, of course - they WROTE her like that, much to Gates McFadden's frustration. There is only ONE episode in which I actually AGREE with her viewpoint and that's "I Borg". If I could actually meet her on the Enterprise the two of us would be throwing knives at each other in no time because she'd hate me as much as I hate her.

And I agree with the Pulaski statement that was made above. Pulaski would've done something. Or at least tried to. Seriously, I'd ask for Pulaski's medical opinion over Crusher's any time because Pulaski actually knows what she's doing and doesn't impose human values on every alien species she encounters. (Unless they're androids, but seriously, she got over her Data dislike pretty quickly and became his friend, so, that argument doesn't really count either.)

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Interesting concept (a violation of the prime directive via the holodeck; so interesting that "Insurrection" would steal it four years later....)

Hah! I was about to ask "....wasn't this Star Trek: Insurrection...the episode?" You beat me to it, Sehlat Vie. :P

I thought this was an alright episode. I'm more annoyed they introduced another Worf family member and DS9 seems to imply the guy is no where to be seen......>.<

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The 7th season was the 'family' season, that's for sure....

Data's android mom

Geordi's ghost mom and real dad

Worf's prime-directive violating half brother

Troi's mother made another appearance (along with flashbacks of her dead sister and father)

Crusher's son Wesley came back to wrap things up

Am I missing anyone?

Oh yeah, Spot had kittens... ;-D

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Yeah you missed Jean-Luc's "son" Jason. Dreadful episode, dreadful idea, dreadful everything. :dry:

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Yeah you missed Jean-Luc's "son" Jason. Dreadful episode, dreadful idea, dreadful everything. :dry:

I think I'd blotted that episode from my conscious memory.... :huh2:

Seriously, that one was so bad (it wasn't even his son, for chrissakes), I just kind of forgot it even existed...

Thanks for making me relive the trauma, Mr. Picard.... :P:laugh:

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I'm so sorry! If it's any comfort, I ignore this episode as well. Ugh. Dreadful. And to think that we actually have to blame Sir Patrick for it... he was the one who remembered Bok and said "hey we should have a sequel". *facepalm*

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I'm so sorry! If it's any comfort, I ignore this episode as well. Ugh. Dreadful. And to think that we actually have to blame Sir Patrick for it... he was the one who remembered Bok and said "hey we should have a sequel". *facepalm*

That's even worse; to hear that the idea came from Stewart himself. Baaaaaad.... :cylonnono:

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I'm so sorry! If it's any comfort, I ignore this episode as well. Ugh. Dreadful. And to think that we actually have to blame Sir Patrick for it... he was the one who remembered Bok and said "hey we should have a sequel". *facepalm*

That's even worse; to hear that the idea came from Stewart himself. Baaaaaad.... :cylonnono:

Oh he and I would be at each other's throats in no time when it comes to these things. HE was the one who demanded for more "sex and action" for Jean-Luc, which resulted in horribleness like Vash AND Insurrection. HE was the one who demanded this dreadful Bok sequel. HE was the one who had no issues whatsoever with Nemesis and still thinks it's an awesome movie... and so on and so on. Ugh, lol.

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I'm so sorry! If it's any comfort, I ignore this episode as well. Ugh. Dreadful. And to think that we actually have to blame Sir Patrick for it... he was the one who remembered Bok and said "hey we should have a sequel". *facepalm*

That's even worse; to hear that the idea came from Stewart himself. Baaaaaad.... :cylonnono:

Oh he and I would be at each other's throats in no time when it comes to these things. HE was the one who demanded for more "sex and action" for Jean-Luc, which resulted in horribleness like Vash AND Insurrection. HE was the one who demanded this dreadful Bok sequel. HE was the one who had no issues whatsoever with Nemesis and still thinks it's an awesome movie... and so on and so on. Ugh, lol.

Maybe he liked Nemesis because the director was a fellow Englishman (Stuart Baird, former editor of the Lethal Weapon franchise), and he allowed for a proper tea time on the set... :P

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I'm so sorry! If it's any comfort, I ignore this episode as well. Ugh. Dreadful. And to think that we actually have to blame Sir Patrick for it... he was the one who remembered Bok and said "hey we should have a sequel". *facepalm*

That's even worse; to hear that the idea came from Stewart himself. Baaaaaad.... :cylonnono:

Oh he and I would be at each other's throats in no time when it comes to these things. HE was the one who demanded for more "sex and action" for Jean-Luc, which resulted in horribleness like Vash AND Insurrection. HE was the one who demanded this dreadful Bok sequel. HE was the one who had no issues whatsoever with Nemesis and still thinks it's an awesome movie... and so on and so on. Ugh, lol.

Maybe he liked Nemesis because the director was a fellow Englishman (Stuart Baird, former editor of the Lethal Weapon franchise), and he allowed for a proper tea time on the set... :P

No, he liked it because he has completely lost the ability to see Jean-Luc as a separate character. He thinks he and Jean-Luc are interchangable, which they MOST DEFINITELY are NOT.

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