Voyager

The Doomsday Machine

Favorite Overall Trek Series/Movie  

206 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your overall favorite Star Trek series?

    • Star Trek: Enterprise
      16
    • Star Trek: The Original Series
      51
    • Star Trek: The Animated Series
      0
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation
      55
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
      50
    • Star Trek: Voyager
      34
  2. 2. What is your overall favorite Star Trek movie?

    • Star Trek - I: The Motion Picture
      10
    • Star Trek - II: The Wrath of Khan
      41
    • Star Trek - III: The Search for Spock
      7
    • Star Trek - IV: The Voyage Home
      22
    • Star Trek - V: The Final Frontier
      4
    • Star Trek - VI: The Undiscovered Country
      29
    • Star Trek - VII: Generations
      11
    • Star Trek - VIII: First Contact
      64
    • Star Trek - IX: Insurrection
      7
    • Star Trek - X: Nemesis
      11


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Decker should never have been able to take command in the first place. He was mentally fragile to the point of having had to be medicated. "If you can certify Commodore Decker mentally or psychologically unfit for command..."

If I were McCoy: "Well, he witnessed his entire crew killed, was nearly catatonic when discovered, had to be heavily medicated, and was barely coherent until he reached this ship. So, yes, given my expertise in space psychology, my medical observations, and the stupidity of his plan,as Chief Medical Officer of this ship I am pronouncing him psychologically unfit pending further evaluation."

Short episode then, but...

Edited by prometheus59650

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Decker should never have been able to take command in the first place. He was mentally fragile to the point of having had to be medicated. "If you can certify Commodore Decker mentally or psychologically unfit for command..."

If I were McCoy: "Well, he witnessed his entire crew killed, was nearly catatonic when discovered, had to be heavily medicated, and was barely coherent until he reached this ship. So, yes, given my expertise in space psychology, my medical observations, and the stupidity of his plan,as Chief Medical Officer of this ship I am pronouncing him psychologically unfit pending further evaluation."

Short episode then, but...

^

Spock's command disqualification in ST09 was a lot shorter; he himself even realized his emotionally compromised state.   But Decker's rank and ego blinded him to the obvious.  This was an occasion where McCoy should've had the medical authority to give an on-the-spot evaluation of Decker's fitness.  The line of Spock's about requiring medical records to be submitted as proof was just so much nonsense.  There HAD to be emergency regs in place to override the need for a complete physical to be performed and submitted before he could be relieved.  

If Starfleet were that poor an organizational structure then it's a true wonder the entire Federation wasn't in tatters by the 24th century...

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Decker should never have been able to take command in the first place. He was mentally fragile to the point of having had to be medicated. "If you can certify Commodore Decker mentally or psychologically unfit for command..."

If I were McCoy: "Well, he witnessed his entire crew killed, was nearly catatonic when discovered, had to be heavily medicated, and was barely coherent until he reached this ship. So, yes, given my expertise in space psychology, my medical observations, and the stupidity of his plan,as Chief Medical Officer of this ship I am pronouncing him psychologically unfit pending further evaluation."

Short episode then, but...

^

Spock's command disqualification in ST09 was a lot shorter; he himself even realized his emotionally compromised state.   But Decker's rank and ego blinded him to the obvious.  This was an occasion where McCoy should've had the medical authority to give an on-the-spot evaluation of Decker's fitness.  The line of Spock's about requiring medical records to be submitted as proof was just so much nonsense.  There HAD to be emergency regs in place to override the need for a complete physical to be performed and submitted before he could be relieved.  

If Starfleet were that poor an organizational structure then it's a true wonder the entire Federation wasn't in tatters by the 24th century...

A need for medical records that suddenly vanished by "Obsession," I might add.

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Decker should never have been able to take command in the first place. He was mentally fragile to the point of having had to be medicated. "If you can certify Commodore Decker mentally or psychologically unfit for command..."

If I were McCoy: "Well, he witnessed his entire crew killed, was nearly catatonic when discovered, had to be heavily medicated, and was barely coherent until he reached this ship. So, yes, given my expertise in space psychology, my medical observations, and the stupidity of his plan,as Chief Medical Officer of this ship I am pronouncing him psychologically unfit pending further evaluation."

Short episode then, but...

^

Spock's command disqualification in ST09 was a lot shorter; he himself even realized his emotionally compromised state.   But Decker's rank and ego blinded him to the obvious.  This was an occasion where McCoy should've had the medical authority to give an on-the-spot evaluation of Decker's fitness.  The line of Spock's about requiring medical records to be submitted as proof was just so much nonsense.  There HAD to be emergency regs in place to override the need for a complete physical to be performed and submitted before he could be relieved.  

If Starfleet were that poor an organizational structure then it's a true wonder the entire Federation wasn't in tatters by the 24th century...

A need for medical records that suddenly vanished by "Obsession," I might add.

^
Maybe the incident with Decker led to a change?  

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Decker should never have been able to take command in the first place. He was mentally fragile to the point of having had to be medicated. "If you can certify Commodore Decker mentally or psychologically unfit for command..."

If I were McCoy: "Well, he witnessed his entire crew killed, was nearly catatonic when discovered, had to be heavily medicated, and was barely coherent until he reached this ship. So, yes, given my expertise in space psychology, my medical observations, and the stupidity of his plan,as Chief Medical Officer of this ship I am pronouncing him psychologically unfit pending further evaluation."

Short episode then, but...

^

Spock's command disqualification in ST09 was a lot shorter; he himself even realized his emotionally compromised state.   But Decker's rank and ego blinded him to the obvious.  This was an occasion where McCoy should've had the medical authority to give an on-the-spot evaluation of Decker's fitness.  The line of Spock's about requiring medical records to be submitted as proof was just so much nonsense.  There HAD to be emergency regs in place to override the need for a complete physical to be performed and submitted before he could be relieved.  

If Starfleet were that poor an organizational structure then it's a true wonder the entire Federation wasn't in tatters by the 24th century...

A need for medical records that suddenly vanished by "Obsession," I might add.

^
Maybe the incident with Decker led to a change?  

Maybe, but 100 or so years of exploration and the need for that never came up until then what with all the unknown bacteria, viruses, mind-controlling aliens, parasites, and energy forms around?

And then look at "Lonely Among Us." Picard is clearly off his nut and they hem and haw about how to deal with it. In the end, when it comes down to it, the profoundly weirdly acting Captain gets to order the people who are actually correctly questioning his fitness to Sickbay to be examined themselves and they acquiesce?

But, in "Allegiance" Riker quite correctly, single-handedly takes the ship.

I swear, it's almost as if Starfleet regs are whatever might make for the greatest drama in any given situation. :P 

Edited by prometheus59650

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This is a great episode, to be sure.  The only times I sympathized with Decker is when he broke down in front of Kirk and McCoy on the Constellation, clearly in state of  deep shock, and again as he flew the shuttlecraft to his death inside the DM.  Otherwise, he acts like a complete turd.

The episode does have a few bugs in it from the writing perspective.  The ship was already badly damaged, but I never understood why 1) Decker chose to beam down over 400 crew members to the third planet when the DM was already destroying the fourth planet (why did he think it wouldn't also destroy the third?) and 2) how he had the time to do so, considering the transporter can only beam about  6 people at a time.    

The second technical nitpick I have of the episode is expecting a badly damaged starship with no warp drive capability and barely operating impulse engines to cause an explosion that would render the DM powerless.  Now had the Constellation been fully operational, the resulting explosion might well have been enough to severely damage or destroy it.  Ah well....  

As to the relationship of Matt Decker to Will Decker in STTMP, I am almost 100% certain I remember reading in the novel that Will is Matt's son.  It's ironic that the father is killed by a machine, while the son becomes a new life form with a machine.  Poor Mrs. Decker, whoever and wherever she is, loses both husband and son to machines. :(

^
Not to nit, but early on in the episode Scotty remarks (after boarding the Constellation and reviewing her engine status) that "the impulse engines are in fair shape, I might coax 'em..."   I'd imagine that two immensely powerful fusion reactors, even operating in only 'fair' shape, could still be very powerful bombs if properly rigged.  

And yes, according to the TMP novelization, written by Roddenberry himself (allegedly), Will is the son of Matt Decker.  

Quite possibly. I do remember Scotty making that comment.

I also forgot to mention that I really liked Lt. Palmer in this episode.  Every bit as highly competent as Uhura.  She was also in "The Way to Eden", and I was surprised to learn she was the voice of the Companion in "Metamorphosis".  Interesting!

Totally agree with subsequent comments about how ridiculous it was that McCoy couldn't certify Decker as being unfit for duty (with required medical/psychological examinations to follow), and that Spock had no legal recourse until it became clear Decker was hell bent on committing the Enterprise to a suicidal plan of action in attacking the DM.  Everyone can sympathize with what the poor man had been through, but that experience alone should have been reason enough to have legally kept him from being able to take command.  

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