Voyager

The Doomsday Machine

Favorite Overall Trek Series/Movie  

206 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your overall favorite Star Trek series?

    • Star Trek: Enterprise
      16
    • Star Trek: The Original Series
      51
    • Star Trek: The Animated Series
      0
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation
      55
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
      50
    • Star Trek: Voyager
      34
  2. 2. What is your overall favorite Star Trek movie?

    • Star Trek - I: The Motion Picture
      10
    • Star Trek - II: The Wrath of Khan
      41
    • Star Trek - III: The Search for Spock
      7
    • Star Trek - IV: The Voyage Home
      22
    • Star Trek - V: The Final Frontier
      4
    • Star Trek - VI: The Undiscovered Country
      29
    • Star Trek - VII: Generations
      11
    • Star Trek - VIII: First Contact
      64
    • Star Trek - IX: Insurrection
      7
    • Star Trek - X: Nemesis
      11


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I remember seeing this one in first run and not liking it then. Since I'm using streaming NetFlix to go through TOS now, I still didn't like it. The premise that a device of that relatively small size could eat planets was beyond preposterous. Likewise, the thought that detonating a matter / anti-matter explosion inside something of that proposed power causing its destruction was equally ridiculous. Worse still, in first run, the DM looked like a slightly squashed cream horn with all of the cream licked out. The Sho-Rin was NOT impressed. ;-)

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I remember seeing this one in first run and not liking it then. Since I'm using streaming NetFlix to go through TOS now, I still didn't like it. The premise that a device of that relatively small size could eat planets was beyond preposterous. Likewise, the thought that detonating a matter / anti-matter explosion inside something of that proposed power causing its destruction was equally ridiculous. Worse still, in first run, the DM looked like a slightly squashed cream horn with all of the cream licked out. The Sho-Rin was NOT impressed. ;-)

While I have to disagree, I got a hell of a good laugh out of your description of the planet killer.... :laugh::thumbup:

And yes, the science behind the PK is ludicrous, but then again so is red matter, the Genesis device, etc... none of it even remotely plausible. I chalk it up to TV physics (and believe me; I'm a lifelong space geek. I've been an active member of The Planetary Society for 15 years, but I realize that so few programs get space science right that I've learned to relax a bit on those things... except the REALLY bad stuff).

Have to say, in all fairness (and because I'm a nerd), that it was overloading the Constellation's impulse engines (the fusion-based sublight drive) that killed the PK, not it's matter-antimatter warp drive (which was rendered inert). But still, I see your point....

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Just a thought, I remember seeing this on You Tube, so If I am wrong, let me know.

Back in 1995, Paramount redid the special effects for this episode, I saw a clip on You Tube, now I can't find it.

ANYWAY, the special efects were using digital technolgy at he time and the blurb under the vid, basically said "Paramount tried this, and decided not to go further". Circa 1995.

Now if I can EVER find that particular clip, the special effects were VERY GOOD for that time, better even that the re-done TOS on Netflix.

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Just a thought, I remember seeing this on You Tube, so If I am wrong, let me know.

Back in 1995, Paramount redid the special effects for this episode, I saw a clip on You Tube, now I can't find it.

ANYWAY, the special efects were using digital technolgy at he time and the blurb under the vid, basically said "Paramount tried this, and decided not to go further". Circa 1995.

Now if I can EVER find that particular clip, the special effects were VERY GOOD for that time, better even that the re-done TOS on Netflix.

You're right; FX artist Daren Dochtermann (who does much work on the "Ships of the Line" calendars) did a demo reel of improved visuals for this episode. I saw the reel at Comic Con (and later on Youtube) and they were breathtaking. Too bad CBS digital didn't use his work... it was epic!

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You're right; FX artist Daren Dochtermann (who does much work on the "Ships of the Line" calendars) did a demo reel of improved visuals for this episode. I saw the reel at Comic Con (and later on Youtube) and they were breathtaking. Too bad CBS digital didn't use his work... it was epic!

That sounds like it!!! I caught that clip on YouTube, and you could tell the amount of time was put into it.

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You're right; FX artist Daren Dochtermann (who does much work on the "Ships of the Line" calendars) did a demo reel of improved visuals for this episode. I saw the reel at Comic Con (and later on Youtube) and they were breathtaking. Too bad CBS digital didn't use his work... it was epic!

That sounds like it!!! I caught that clip on YouTube, and you could tell the amount of time was put into it.

Dochtermann also did some of the revised FX for Star Trek-TMP director's cut (2001). He's a true artist... ;)

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What makes this episode for me is the music... an entirely original score from Sol Kaplan. It does an amazing job of heightening the tension - it's almost a forerunner of John Williams' famous Jaws score... excellent! - I find myself humming it occasionally; of course, it helps that it was tracked into many subsequent episodes.

Overall, a good episode for TOS.

And the re-mastering makes it look even better!

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I love this epiosde! One of my all-time favorites! The pacing is perfect and the tension continues to build. And Scotty cements his reputation as a miracle worker in this episode. And I love William Windom's slightly over-the-top reaction as he enters the maw of the planet killer:

thumb_thedoomsdaymachinehd1309.jpg

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I find this to be a really good episode, the tense music is almost as classic as the "Amok Time" theme I'd say, and Matt Decker is evil. I'll give it the 9 it deserves.

Gotta know. Why is Matt Decker evil? Obsessed and broken, yes. But how is he evil?

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I find this to be a really good episode, the tense music is almost as classic as the "Amok Time" theme I'd say, and Matt Decker is evil. I'll give it the 9 it deserves.

Gotta know. Why is Matt Decker evil? Obsessed and broken, yes. But how is he evil?

Maybe not evil in the literal sense, but Decker does act like a d-bag to Spock and McCoy when he gets aboard. More than that, he knows how he's acting and he doesn't really care since he is obsessed with avenging his crew.

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I find this to be a really good episode, the tense music is almost as classic as the "Amok Time" theme I'd say, and Matt Decker is evil. I'll give it the 9 it deserves.

Gotta know. Why is Matt Decker evil? Obsessed and broken, yes. But how is he evil?

Maybe not evil in the literal sense, but Decker does act like a d-bag to Spock and McCoy when he gets aboard. More than that, he knows how he's acting and he doesn't really care since he is obsessed with avenging his crew.

And I get that. He can't live with the fact that he survived. He can't live with the fact that that thing still exists. It *has* to die so that the loss of the crew wasn't for nothing and he has to be the one to do it so that there was a reason he survived.

My only nit to pick with the episode is Leonard "expert in space psychology" McCoy not relieving Decker pending a fitness evaluation. Short program otherwise, but....

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My only nit to pick with the episode is Leonard "expert in space psychology" McCoy not relieving Decker pending a fitness evaluation. Short program otherwise, but....

It dealt with this in the episode; McCoy was more than willing to certify Decker unfit for command, but Spock said that such an observation would be invalid without hard evidence - which makes sense when you think about it, otherwise the doctor could just say this kind of thing whenever he felt like it and cause no end of chaos!

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My only nit to pick with the episode is Leonard "expert in space psychology" McCoy not relieving Decker pending a fitness evaluation. Short program otherwise, but....

It dealt with this in the episode; McCoy was more than willing to certify Decker unfit for command, but Spock said that such an observation would be invalid without hard evidence - which makes sense when you think about it, otherwise the doctor could just say this kind of thing whenever he felt like it and cause no end of chaos!

No it doesn't.

Yes. He'd have to produce proof, but given the trauma he already suffered McCoy should be able to relieve him pending a competency exam. In fact by any semblance of common sense Decker shouldn't be able to assume command of anything until he's deemed fit.

So, if by "dealt with" you mean, "covered over for the sake of expediency," then yes. :)

Edited by prometheus59650

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Is there a mention that the Decker in this episode is the father of Decker in TMP? Or is that just wishful thinking by the fans?

I think Roddenberry footnoted that as his intention in the novelization.

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Yes. He'd have to produce proof, but given the trauma he already suffered McCoy should be able to relieve him pending a competency exam. In fact by any semblance of common sense Decker shouldn't be able to assume command of anything until he's deemed fit.

You can't relieve someone of duty (certainly not a high-ranking commodore) based solely on a gut feeling that they might not be fully fit. You need evidence, and that was something McCoy didn't have. If they hadn't been in the middle of a crisis situation, I'm sure that's what would have happened next, but with Kirk off the ship, it was logical that the commodore would take charge... at least on the face of it. Once he then began acting irrationally (and they thus had proof), Spock relieved him fairly quickly.

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Yes. He'd have to produce proof, but given the trauma he already suffered McCoy should be able to relieve him pending a competency exam. In fact by any semblance of common sense Decker shouldn't be able to assume command of anything until he's deemed fit.

You can't relieve someone of duty (certainly not a high-ranking commodore) based solely on a gut feeling that they might not be fully fit. You need evidence, and that was something McCoy didn't have. If they hadn't been in the middle of a crisis situation, I'm sure that's what would have happened next, but with Kirk off the ship, it was logical that the commodore would take charge... at least on the face of it. Once he then began acting irrationally (and they thus had proof), Spock relieved him fairly quickly.

What I'm ultimately saying is that after presiding over the loss of your ship and the death of your crew, regulations should be that you aren't in command of anything until you're medically cleared.

And Spock didn't relieve him after Decker behaved irrationality, Spock covered his backside by relying on Kirk's "personal authority as Captain of the Enterprise. "

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Yes. He'd have to produce proof, but given the trauma he already suffered McCoy should be able to relieve him pending a competency exam. In fact by any semblance of common sense Decker shouldn't be able to assume command of anything until he's deemed fit.

You can't relieve someone of duty (certainly not a high-ranking commodore) based solely on a gut feeling that they might not be fully fit. You need evidence, and that was something McCoy didn't have. If they hadn't been in the middle of a crisis situation, I'm sure that's what would have happened next, but with Kirk off the ship, it was logical that the commodore would take charge... at least on the face of it. Once he then began acting irrationally (and they thus had proof), Spock relieved him fairly quickly.

What I'm ultimately saying is that after presiding over the loss of your ship and the death of your crew, regulations should be that you aren't in command of anything until you're medically cleared.

And Spock didn't relieve him after Decker behaved irrationality, Spock covered his backside by relying on Kirk's "personal authority as Captain of the Enterprise. "

Spock could've relieved him using the basis of his own dismissal in the alternate timeline, Commodore Decker was clearly "emotionally compromised."

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True, but that regulation is very nebulous sounding to the point of it being almost good for anytime you like. I mean, virtually any mission can, and often does, compromise the Captain to some extent.

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Is there a mention that the Decker in this episode is the father of Decker in TMP? Or is that just wishful thinking by the fans?

I think Roddenberry footnoted that as his intention in the novelization.

No mention (either here or in TMP), but I'm sure that was the intent.

Thanks to both of you! I was just curious.

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This is a great episode, to be sure.  The only times I sympathized with Decker is when he broke down in front of Kirk and McCoy on the Constellation, clearly in state of  deep shock, and again as he flew the shuttlecraft to his death inside the DM.  Otherwise, he acts like a complete turd.

The episode does have a few bugs in it from the writing perspective.  The ship was already badly damaged, but I never understood why 1) Decker chose to beam down over 400 crew members to the third planet when the DM was already destroying the fourth planet (why did he think it wouldn't also destroy the third?) and 2) how he had the time to do so, considering the transporter can only beam about  6 people at a time.    

The second technical nitpick I have of the episode is expecting a badly damaged starship with no warp drive capability and barely operating impulse engines to cause an explosion that would render the DM powerless.  Now had the Constellation been fully operational, the resulting explosion might well have been enough to severely damage or destroy it.  Ah well....  

As to the relationship of Matt Decker to Will Decker in STTMP, I am almost 100% certain I remember reading in the novel that Will is Matt's son.  It's ironic that the father is killed by a machine, while the son becomes a new life form with a machine.  Poor Mrs. Decker, whoever and wherever she is, loses both husband and son to machines. :(

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This is a great episode, to be sure.  The only times I sympathized with Decker is when he broke down in front of Kirk and McCoy on the Constellation, clearly in state of  deep shock, and again as he flew the shuttlecraft to his death inside the DM.  Otherwise, he acts like a complete turd.

The episode does have a few bugs in it from the writing perspective.  The ship was already badly damaged, but I never understood why 1) Decker chose to beam down over 400 crew members to the third planet when the DM was already destroying the fourth planet (why did he think it wouldn't also destroy the third?) and 2) how he had the time to do so, considering the transporter can only beam about  6 people at a time.    

The second technical nitpick I have of the episode is expecting a badly damaged starship with no warp drive capability and barely operating impulse engines to cause an explosion that would render the DM powerless.  Now had the Constellation been fully operational, the resulting explosion might well have been enough to severely damage or destroy it.  Ah well....  

As to the relationship of Matt Decker to Will Decker in STTMP, I am almost 100% certain I remember reading in the novel that Will is Matt's son.  It's ironic that the father is killed by a machine, while the son becomes a new life form with a machine.  Poor Mrs. Decker, whoever and wherever she is, loses both husband and son to machines. :(

^
Not to nit, but early on in the episode Scotty remarks (after boarding the Constellation and reviewing her engine status) that "the impulse engines are in fair shape, I might coax 'em..."   I'd imagine that two immensely powerful fusion reactors, even operating in only 'fair' shape, could still be very powerful bombs if properly rigged.  

And yes, according to the TMP novelization, written by Roddenberry himself (allegedly), Will is the son of Matt Decker.  

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