Favorite Overall Trek Series/Movie  

206 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your overall favorite Star Trek series?

    • Star Trek: Enterprise
      16
    • Star Trek: The Original Series
      51
    • Star Trek: The Animated Series
      0
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation
      55
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
      50
    • Star Trek: Voyager
      34
  2. 2. What is your overall favorite Star Trek movie?

    • Star Trek - I: The Motion Picture
      10
    • Star Trek - II: The Wrath of Khan
      41
    • Star Trek - III: The Search for Spock
      7
    • Star Trek - IV: The Voyage Home
      22
    • Star Trek - V: The Final Frontier
      4
    • Star Trek - VI: The Undiscovered Country
      29
    • Star Trek - VII: Generations
      11
    • Star Trek - VIII: First Contact
      64
    • Star Trek - IX: Insurrection
      7
    • Star Trek - X: Nemesis
      11


Recommended Posts

Wow! This one was like dead yesterday :laugh: .

I also loved how they kept telling these people about children and how they would find out what they were lol!

Oh, yes... I'm sure when the native women of Gamma Trianguli 6 are in the AGONIZING wonderful throes of childbirth, they will be sure to take time and send Kirk and company a big, fat thank you note... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This one is a guilty pleasure for me... Its perhaps my favourite use of the planet of the week set, lots of red shirts dying, great Kirk-Spock-McCoy bantering, good parts for Doohan and Keonig, and the Enterprise in jeopardy story to boot.

It's so wonderfully typical of S2; I couldn't hate it if I tried. Kirk kills a computer/god, breaks the prime directive, and saves the ship (from the ground!). I'm surprised he didn't boink a native while he was at it.... :giggle:

A planet of scantily-clad native girls who have no idea of the whole baby-making thing and have no learned cultural resistance to his natural charm?

He totally burned a ton of accumulated shore leave there.

Edited by prometheus59650

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Favorite of mine too, though I'm more and more confused about why they were ordered by starfleet to make contact with the natives when they are clearly not warp capable yet so therefore the Prime Directive would apply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Favorite of mine too, though I'm more and more confused about why they were ordered by starfleet to make contact with the natives when they are clearly not warp capable yet so therefore the Prime Directive would apply.

Perhaps it was Convenient Excuse #2: "This is a planet vital as a spaceport, or for use in shipping lanes, or as a dilithium mine, a rest stop, or a site for a future Walmart, etc. etc. "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This episode was on BBC America yesterday afternoon (thank God they are showing TOS on Fridays!), and it's one I always like to watch.  I just read over previous comments and died laughing at the "Fakebake tanning spray" observation as well as "You gotta love Nimoy's classic WTF expression..." at being hit by the poisonous thorns. Love it!!  :thumbup:  Hard to believe "Akuta" (David Soul) would become Hutch of "Starsky & Hutch" fame only a few years later! 

Okay, here are two things I've never understood about this episode.  1) Why the he** would a machine need to be fed fruits & vegetables?  Really?  Talk about a WTF moment!  What were the writers smoking that day?  :loopy:  2) I read a comment somewhere that Kirk "jokingly" threatens to fire Scotty if he can't save the ship. As many times as I've seen this episode, I don't feel Kirk is joking at all.  Again, I gotta blame the writers on this.  Scotty is the best Chief Engineer in Starfleet, and by now Kirk should damn well KNOW that he is doing everything in his power to save the ship.  If he can't then not only will he die, but he'll take 430 other crew members with him.  I think Scotty is smart enough to get that, don't you?  Okay, is it really necessary then to threaten to fire him if he fails?  Fired and dead--what a nice way to end Scotty's service record! When Kirk "rehires" him, Scotty should have told him to go suck an egg!  Bad, bad writing.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This episode was on BBC America yesterday afternoon (thank God they are showing TOS on Fridays!), and it's one I always like to watch.  I just read over previous comments and died laughing at the "Fakebake tanning spray" observation as well as "You gotta love Nimoy's classic WTF expression..." at being hit by the poisonous thorns. Love it!!  :thumbup:  Hard to believe "Akuta" (David Soul) would become Hutch of "Starsky & Hutch" fame only a few years later! 

Okay, here are two things I've never understood about this episode.  1) Why the he** would a machine need to be fed fruits & vegetables?  Really?  Talk about a WTF moment!  What were the writers smoking that day?  :loopy:  2) I read a comment somewhere that Kirk "jokingly" threatens to fire Scotty if he can't save the ship. As many times as I've seen this episode, I don't feel Kirk is joking at all.  Again, I gotta blame the writers on this.  Scotty is the best Chief Engineer in Starfleet, and by now Kirk should damn well KNOW that he is doing everything in his power to save the ship.  If he can't then not only will he die, but he'll take 430 other crew members with him.  I think Scotty is smart enough to get that, don't you?  Okay, is it really necessary then to threaten to fire him if he fails?  Fired and dead--what a nice way to end Scotty's service record! When Kirk "rehires" him, Scotty should have told him to go suck an egg!  Bad, bad writing.....

^
I like this one too, but it has some major writing issues.

But on the points you address?  I have my own answers.

On the nature of Vaal:  my guess is that it directly converts the water, sugars and fibers from food directly into some kind of highly efficient fusion reactor.   Basically like a human body only far more efficient; Vaal leaves no waste product.   Everything it consumes is converted (via biochemistry/fusion) directly into energy.   My guess is that it's design was deliberate.  Perhaps after whatever calamity that led to Vaal's creation ('the dim time') the designers decided that the people needed a 'god-thing' (to use Roddenberry's expression) to worship and pay tribute to, so they designed a reactor that needed frequent supplies of simple 'food' (thus ensuring that a rudimentary agrarian culture was maintained, but nothing else).  It also reinforced the natives' image of Vaal as a 'living' thing and not a machine; if the people of Vaal looked upon their deity as a mere device, they'd be arguably less inclined to 'worship' and pay tribute to it (despite all it does for them and their planet).   And of course, if they fail to 'feed' their god?   It grows angry (using its reverses, which as we see, aren't that great).   The fact that it needed to eat frequently was deliberate as well; to ensure that the people lived only to maintain it, and lacked time for much else. 

As for firing Scotty?  I think Kirk was merely being grimly facetious.  
Firing Scotty was a futile act for two reasons; there was no more qualified officer onboard the ship who could've done better (Scotty is a hell of an acting captain; he saved the ship and crew numerous times:  "Bread & Circuses" "Taste of Armageddon" "Metamorphosis" etc), and, most importantly; the Federation doesn't use money.   It was merely Kirk expressing his frustration and impotence at not being able to help his own ship. 

 

 

My biggest beef with this episode was this: why the hell was it so important for Starfleet to make contact with such a (seemingly) less advanced (and pre-warp) civilization?   First off, it's a clear violation of the prime directive as we understood it thus far on the show (and in future incarnations).  Secondly, beyond a stable climate and tremendous subsurface energy readings, what did the planet seemingly offer?   And infinite supply of fake tan spray?  What?

Was first contact REALLY worth the lives of those poor red shirts and Spock taking such a beating?   I don't think so....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This episode was on BBC America yesterday afternoon (thank God they are showing TOS on Fridays!), and it's one I always like to watch.  I just read over previous comments and died laughing at the "Fakebake tanning spray" observation as well as "You gotta love Nimoy's classic WTF expression..." at being hit by the poisonous thorns. Love it!!  :thumbup:  Hard to believe "Akuta" (David Soul) would become Hutch of "Starsky & Hutch" fame only a few years later! 

Okay, here are two things I've never understood about this episode.  1) Why the he** would a machine need to be fed fruits & vegetables?  Really?  Talk about a WTF moment!  What were the writers smoking that day?  :loopy:  2) I read a comment somewhere that Kirk "jokingly" threatens to fire Scotty if he can't save the ship. As many times as I've seen this episode, I don't feel Kirk is joking at all.  Again, I gotta blame the writers on this.  Scotty is the best Chief Engineer in Starfleet, and by now Kirk should damn well KNOW that he is doing everything in his power to save the ship.  If he can't then not only will he die, but he'll take 430 other crew members with him.  I think Scotty is smart enough to get that, don't you?  Okay, is it really necessary then to threaten to fire him if he fails?  Fired and dead--what a nice way to end Scotty's service record! When Kirk "rehires" him, Scotty should have told him to go suck an egg!  Bad, bad writing.....

^
I like this one too, but it has some major writing issues.

But on the points you address?  I have my own answers.

On the nature of Vaal:  my guess is that it directly converts the water, sugars and fibers from food directly into some kind of highly efficient fusion reactor.   Basically like a human body only far more efficient; Vaal leaves no waste product.   Everything it consumes is converted (via biochemistry/fusion) directly into energy.   My guess is that it's design was deliberate.  Perhaps after whatever calamity that led to Vaal's creation ('the dim time') the designers decided that the people needed a 'god-thing' (to use Roddenberry's expression) to worship and pay tribute to, so they designed a reactor that needed frequent supplies of simple 'food' (thus ensuring that a rudimentary agrarian culture was maintained, but nothing else).  It also reinforced the natives' image of Vaal as a 'living' thing and not a machine; if the people of Vaal looked upon their deity as a mere device, they'd be arguably less inclined to 'worship' and pay tribute to it (despite all it does for them and their planet).   And of course, if they fail to 'feed' their god?   It grows angry (using its reverses, which as we see, aren't that great).   The fact that it needed to eat frequently was deliberate as well; to ensure that the people lived only to maintain it, and lacked time for much else. 

As for firing Scotty?  I think Kirk was merely being grimly facetious.  
Firing Scotty was a futile act for two reasons; there was no more qualified officer onboard the ship who could've done better (Scotty is a hell of an acting captain; he saved the ship and crew numerous times:  "Bread & Circuses" "Taste of Armageddon" "Metamorphosis" etc), and, most importantly; the Federation doesn't use money.   It was merely Kirk expressing his frustration and impotence at not being able to help his own ship. 

 

 

My biggest beef with this episode was this: why the hell was it so important for Starfleet to make contact with such a (seemingly) less advanced (and pre-warp) civilization?   First off, it's a clear violation of the prime directive as we understood it thus far on the show (and in future incarnations).  Secondly, beyond a stable climate and tremendous subsurface energy readings, what did the planet seemingly offer?   And infinite supply of fake tan spray?  What?

Was first contact REALLY worth the lives of those poor red shirts and Spock taking such a beating?   I don't think so....

That's what I don't get. maybe it's just a poor turn of phrase, but I could have understood something like "A survey probe detected strange subsurface energy readings from the planet with no apparent cause, and Starfleet wants us to investigate while avoiding contact with the indigenous life."  They should still have just left it alone because Prime Directive, but okay.

But they all acted like it was just some standard planetary survey that Starfleet wanted done, so the question becomes, "Why?" 

The same way I ask why you needed a treaty port with Eminiar so badly that you were willing to risk interplanetary war by going someplace you were explicitly told to stay away from? They, technologically, could have been the Voth for all you know and now the whole Federation is a threat they have to get rid of.

The same way I ask why you couldn't leave the Melkot the hell alone either?

I know that the Melkot came after this, but incidents like this were a pattern, and if I were the Halkans, I would have asked Kirk why exactly I'm supposed to believe that you won't take our crystals from us and will just leave if we tell you to?"

Edited by prometheus59650

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This episode was on BBC America yesterday afternoon (thank God they are showing TOS on Fridays!), and it's one I always like to watch.  I just read over previous comments and died laughing at the "Fakebake tanning spray" observation as well as "You gotta love Nimoy's classic WTF expression..." at being hit by the poisonous thorns. Love it!!  :thumbup:  Hard to believe "Akuta" (David Soul) would become Hutch of "Starsky & Hutch" fame only a few years later! 

Okay, here are two things I've never understood about this episode.  1) Why the he** would a machine need to be fed fruits & vegetables?  Really?  Talk about a WTF moment!  What were the writers smoking that day?  :loopy:  2) I read a comment somewhere that Kirk "jokingly" threatens to fire Scotty if he can't save the ship. As many times as I've seen this episode, I don't feel Kirk is joking at all.  Again, I gotta blame the writers on this.  Scotty is the best Chief Engineer in Starfleet, and by now Kirk should damn well KNOW that he is doing everything in his power to save the ship.  If he can't then not only will he die, but he'll take 430 other crew members with him.  I think Scotty is smart enough to get that, don't you?  Okay, is it really necessary then to threaten to fire him if he fails?  Fired and dead--what a nice way to end Scotty's service record! When Kirk "rehires" him, Scotty should have told him to go suck an egg!  Bad, bad writing.....

^
I like this one too, but it has some major writing issues.

But on the points you address?  I have my own answers.

On the nature of Vaal:  my guess is that it directly converts the water, sugars and fibers from food directly into some kind of highly efficient fusion reactor.   Basically like a human body only far more efficient; Vaal leaves no waste product.   Everything it consumes is converted (via biochemistry/fusion) directly into energy.   My guess is that it's design was deliberate.  Perhaps after whatever calamity that led to Vaal's creation ('the dim time') the designers decided that the people needed a 'god-thing' (to use Roddenberry's expression) to worship and pay tribute to, so they designed a reactor that needed frequent supplies of simple 'food' (thus ensuring that a rudimentary agrarian culture was maintained, but nothing else).  It also reinforced the natives' image of Vaal as a 'living' thing and not a machine; if the people of Vaal looked upon their deity as a mere device, they'd be arguably less inclined to 'worship' and pay tribute to it (despite all it does for them and their planet).   And of course, if they fail to 'feed' their god?   It grows angry (using its reverses, which as we see, aren't that great).   The fact that it needed to eat frequently was deliberate as well; to ensure that the people lived only to maintain it, and lacked time for much else. 

As for firing Scotty?  I think Kirk was merely being grimly facetious.  
Firing Scotty was a futile act for two reasons; there was no more qualified officer onboard the ship who could've done better (Scotty is a hell of an acting captain; he saved the ship and crew numerous times:  "Bread & Circuses" "Taste of Armageddon" "Metamorphosis" etc), and, most importantly; the Federation doesn't use money.   It was merely Kirk expressing his frustration and impotence at not being able to help his own ship. 

 

 

My biggest beef with this episode was this: why the hell was it so important for Starfleet to make contact with such a (seemingly) less advanced (and pre-warp) civilization?   First off, it's a clear violation of the prime directive as we understood it thus far on the show (and in future incarnations).  Secondly, beyond a stable climate and tremendous subsurface energy readings, what did the planet seemingly offer?   And infinite supply of fake tan spray?  What?

Was first contact REALLY worth the lives of those poor red shirts and Spock taking such a beating?   I don't think so....

Loved reading your thoughts on why Vaal has to be fed because, for the life of me, I never understood that.  As Spock would say, "Logical..flawlessly logical".  What you describe makes perfect sense.  Also, I totally agree with your statement about Scotty being a hell of an acting captain.  He certainly is.  I state in my blog that "Scotty has saved the ship's (and Kirk's) bacon on numerous occasions", but it still galls me to hear Kirk threaten to fire him, even if he is only being grimly facetious.  I'm pretty sure Scotty felt bad enough about the situation as it was without his C.O. trying making him feel worse.  Just my opinion, of course.

I also agree with you and prometheus59650 about Starfleet pressing the matter of making contact / establishing relations with various planetary inhabitants when it clearly isn't always in their best interest to do so. To give Kirk credit, in this episode he did at least reproach himself a couple of times with failing to call off the mission at the first sign of trouble, and if memory serves, in "A Taste of Armaggeddon" he wasn't especially thrilled with Ambassador Fox's anal insistence on establishing relations with the Eminians at all costs, even when they had been clearly warned to stay away.  (Makes me wish Scotty could have hauled off and belted Fox right across the kisser for being such an a**hole, but only in a perfect universe, right?) :P  I'm also reminded of the only death penalty in Starfleet for any vessel reaching planet Talos IV ("The Menagerie").  Didn't Starfleet learn from that experience that not every planet should be contacted?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All good points about this as well as Taste of Armageddon and Spectre of the Gun. 

Whenever I think of Kirk telling Scotty he's fired, I have the image of my head of Scotty just saying "yes sir, I'll clean out my desk and take a shuttle out of here, so long suckers".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All good points about this as well as Taste of Armageddon and Spectre of the Gun. 

Whenever I think of Kirk telling Scotty he's fired, I have the image of my head of Scotty just saying "yes sir, I'll clean out my desk and take a shuttle out of here, so long suckers".

Love it!!!! :thumbup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All good points about this as well as Taste of Armageddon and Spectre of the Gun. 

Whenever I think of Kirk telling Scotty he's fired, I have the image of my head of Scotty just saying "yes sir, I'll clean out my desk and take a shuttle out of here, so long suckers".

Love it!!!! :thumbup:

LOL! 

I'd love to see a cut where Scotty takes him literally and puts poor Lt. Kyle in charge... :giggle:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This episode was on BBC America yesterday afternoon (thank God they are showing TOS on Fridays!), and it's one I always like to watch.  I just read over previous comments and died laughing at the "Fakebake tanning spray" observation as well as "You gotta love Nimoy's classic WTF expression..." at being hit by the poisonous thorns. Love it!!  :thumbup:  Hard to believe "Akuta" (David Soul) would become Hutch of "Starsky & Hutch" fame only a few years later! 

Okay, here are two things I've never understood about this episode.  1) Why the he** would a machine need to be fed fruits & vegetables?  Really?  Talk about a WTF moment!  What were the writers smoking that day?  :loopy:  2) I read a comment somewhere that Kirk "jokingly" threatens to fire Scotty if he can't save the ship. As many times as I've seen this episode, I don't feel Kirk is joking at all.  Again, I gotta blame the writers on this.  Scotty is the best Chief Engineer in Starfleet, and by now Kirk should damn well KNOW that he is doing everything in his power to save the ship.  If he can't then not only will he die, but he'll take 430 other crew members with him.  I think Scotty is smart enough to get that, don't you?  Okay, is it really necessary then to threaten to fire him if he fails?  Fired and dead--what a nice way to end Scotty's service record! When Kirk "rehires" him, Scotty should have told him to go suck an egg!  Bad, bad writing.....

Vall was being fed the rocks that explode - Spock comments that it would make a great power source - the fruit and vegetables are probably just garnish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This episode was on BBC America yesterday afternoon (thank God they are showing TOS on Fridays!), and it's one I always like to watch.  I just read over previous comments and died laughing at the "Fakebake tanning spray" observation as well as "You gotta love Nimoy's classic WTF expression..." at being hit by the poisonous thorns. Love it!!  :thumbup:  Hard to believe "Akuta" (David Soul) would become Hutch of "Starsky & Hutch" fame only a few years later! 

Okay, here are two things I've never understood about this episode.  1) Why the he** would a machine need to be fed fruits & vegetables?  Really?  Talk about a WTF moment!  What were the writers smoking that day?  :loopy:  2) I read a comment somewhere that Kirk "jokingly" threatens to fire Scotty if he can't save the ship. As many times as I've seen this episode, I don't feel Kirk is joking at all.  Again, I gotta blame the writers on this.  Scotty is the best Chief Engineer in Starfleet, and by now Kirk should damn well KNOW that he is doing everything in his power to save the ship.  If he can't then not only will he die, but he'll take 430 other crew members with him.  I think Scotty is smart enough to get that, don't you?  Okay, is it really necessary then to threaten to fire him if he fails?  Fired and dead--what a nice way to end Scotty's service record! When Kirk "rehires" him, Scotty should have told him to go suck an egg!  Bad, bad writing.....

Vall was being fed the rocks that explode - Spock comments that it would make a great power source - the fruit and vegetables are probably just garnish.

^
Ah, thanks! 
I remember the exploding rocks being mentioned as a potential power source, but I must've forgotten any reference to the villagers feeding them to Vaal.   Makes sense. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This episode was on BBC America again the other day, and I finally did notice the natives feeding Vaal rocks instead of fruits and veggies!  I also mentioned in my previous post that David Soul (of "Starsky & Hutch" fame) plays Akuta, but learned that he, in fact, plays Makora, the young man who will soon be making new little natives with Sayana. :giggle:  Seems odd that Soul is usually listed on program guide descriptions instead of Keith Andes who plays Akuta and who has a much more prominent guest star role.   Anyway, a fun episode to watch!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This episode was on BBC America again the other day, and I finally did notice the natives feeding Vaal rocks instead of fruits and veggies!  I also mentioned in my previous post that David Soul (of "Starsky & Hutch" fame) plays Akuta, but learned that he, in fact, plays Makora, the young man who will soon be making new little natives with Sayana. :giggle:  Seems odd that Soul is usually listed on program guide descriptions instead of Keith Andes who plays Akuta and who has a much more prominent guest star role.   Anyway, a fun episode to watch!

Because David Soul has some pop culture relevance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites