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Voyager

Charlie X

Favorite Overall Trek Series/Movie  

206 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your overall favorite Star Trek series?

    • Star Trek: Enterprise
      16
    • Star Trek: The Original Series
      51
    • Star Trek: The Animated Series
      0
    • Star Trek: The Next Generation
      55
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
      50
    • Star Trek: Voyager
      34
  2. 2. What is your overall favorite Star Trek movie?

    • Star Trek - I: The Motion Picture
      10
    • Star Trek - II: The Wrath of Khan
      41
    • Star Trek - III: The Search for Spock
      7
    • Star Trek - IV: The Voyage Home
      22
    • Star Trek - V: The Final Frontier
      4
    • Star Trek - VI: The Undiscovered Country
      29
    • Star Trek - VII: Generations
      11
    • Star Trek - VIII: First Contact
      64
    • Star Trek - IX: Insurrection
      7
    • Star Trek - X: Nemesis
      11


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Onto the next episode.

Again, I find myself pretty impressed with TOS. I really thought I'd find it difficult to watch due to the hokey acting infamous from the 60s television. TOS does have some of that but for the most part? Pretty good episode. I give it a solid 9. I have nothing about it that I don't really like. Except no Scotty, Sulu, or Chekov (whom I'm told won't pop up until season 2 anyways).

So it starts off right away with a kind ominous, uncertain feel to it. The Antares captain dropping off the mysterious Charlie. What was with the "X" though in the title? I was already intrigued by the oddness of the character and the actor played him well. I'm often impressed with the guest characters and I've seen better acting here than in some modern day t.v. shows. Charlie's shock at seeing a "girl" for the first time was pretty humorous and Janice Rand is pretty hott if I may say so. Good choice on his part!

The introduction of Kirk's green sash uniform. I like this uniform more than the typical gold shirt. So I was glad to see it breath life here! But what was up with the continuity? He was constantly switching back and forth between the two. One piece of discontinuity is he enters the turbolift in a gold shirt and comes onto the bridge in the green one immediately after. Unless we just assume he stopped to change midway. I guess that's possible...

CAPITALISM IN COMMUNIST STARK TREK ALERT! Did Rand tell Charlie that the gift he offered her was not in the ship's stores? So they have some kind of...commerce area on the Enterprise? Ok...I gotta ask it...how do people pay for the stuff?

I found it hilarious that Charlie spanked Janice in confusion. I was wondering why the engineer spanked the other one out of the blue. So it makes sense they did that to have him spank Janice. I also laughed when he slapped Kirk's ass to show what he had done to Janice and Kirk's expression...

At one point, Kirk is given a "clip board" with crew reports. Sisko gives him one too in the DS9 time travel episode. What is that? For him to "sign off" that each department gave him a report?

Uh oh....Spock and Uhura moment again. Uhura singing to Spock's instrument? She was flirting with him again. Listen to the "lyrics" she makes up. And at one point, Spock smiled at her. I will grant that I can't imagine Zoe Saldana's Uhura singing. :P

Holiday! A mention that Thanksgiving still exists on Earth. I read that Roddenberry did the voice of the chef and I laughed at Charlie's "hah!" at the mention of turkeys suddenly appearing on the ship.

Tri-dimensional chess appears!

The scene where Kirk and Charlie are talking in his quarters (or maybe his office?) reminded me of the scene in ENT "In a Mirror Darkly" where Archer is showing the Federation records of his "other" self's life to Hoshi. They recreated that amazingly well. Props to them for matching this room.

Nice to see the "brig" appear and I found it funny that Charlie just made the entire wall disappear to disable the forcefield.

A mention of that space agency Kirk supposedly works for. Is this ever reconciled with Starfleet at some point?

Anyone else find it funny that of all the people to teach Charlie how to treat women right...they get Kirk? Him stuttering on the way to behave like a gentleman was hilarious. I was half-expecting Kirk to high-five him when Charlie told him he slapped Rand's ass. Kirk's gymnasium scene was hilarious. I bet he practices his karate chop there all day. There were two guys training with weapons that looked like the same ones used in some sport Riker and his father engaged in. Pretty interesting. Kirk's obligatory shirtless scenes begin... Reminds me of Galaxy Quest. "You managed to get your shirt off...."

The scene where Kirk, McCoy, and Spock are trying to discuss what Charlie is and where his powers comes from is interesting. McCoy mentions that Charlie can't possibly be non-human because he pretty much has a humanoid body. Five fingers and five toes? Um....so does Spock....

Ok I just watched this episode before I'm going to bed. Um...the faceless woman is going to give me nightmares. I felt people should know that. Ugh...friggin weird, but kudos to them for going there in showing his power.

Speaking of his powers....does he have to look so ridiculous in using his powers? Haha...what the hell...

The aliens that came for Charlie were of the same breed as the Wizard of Oz hologram I take it? :P

I know Trek is famous for it, so me banging on about it is meaningless. But I have to say I was amazed by how diverse the crew was. Granted, most of the non-whites were in the background but they still were there. Engineers, doctors, security officers, etc. It was impressive for that time period. Nicely done.

I really liked the dialogue in this episode. From Kirk's "there are a million things in this universe you can have and a million things in this universe you cannot." to Charlie describing his lust for Rand as a hunger all over his body.

Btw, the character of Charlie X was in a fan fiction movie I think. A big budget one with many actors from the show. I can't remember the name, but he seemed familiar to me when they first showed him and he displayed his powers.

Anyways, I've been rambling on and on. I honestly can't think of anything I dislike of this episode. Not even a tiny nitpick (minus them not being able to get the continuity right on Kirk's shirt) OR that the Enterprise didn't fight...again. I wanna see why this ship is so famous! :P

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A mention of that space agency Kirk supposedly works for. Is this ever reconciled with Starfleet at some point?

It gets smoothed out by the end of the season; it's UESPA (United Earth Space Probe Agency) up until "Tomorrow Is Yesterday" or so. Then it's simply Starfleet Command after that. ENT tried to shoehorn in the whole UESPA thing into the 4th season by having a UESPA logo at Starfleet HQ in the episode, "Demons."

Ok I just watched this episode before I'm going to bed. Um...the faceless woman is going to give me nightmares. I felt people should know that. Ugh...friggin weird, but kudos to them for going there in showing his power.

That scene DISTURBED THE S#!T out of me when I was a kid.... :dontgetit:

This episode is a 9 to me; Robert Walker Jr. gives an astounding performance. He is at turns impish, angelic & lovable and then terrifying in the next. He really makes this one work. And yes, I agree with your comment about the diverse cast; it's almost a throwaway, but it counts (especially in the wild upheaval of the Civil Rights movement of the '60s when it aired; this was also the time of the Watts Riots in L.A., remember...). It was a BIG deal back then to show a racially diverse crew as nonchalantly as ST did...

Anyone else find it funny that of all the people to teach Charlie how to treat women right...they get Kirk? Him stuttering on the way to behave like a gentleman was hilarious. I was half-expecting Kirk to high-five him when Charlie told him he slapped Rand's ass.

And this was BEFORE Kirk's rep as a ladies' man really happened. Already he had a difficult time articulating how not to be a pig to women.

Guilty conscience, perhaps? :laugh:

Again, thanks for helping me vicariously relive this one; I love "Charlie X". Although it can be argued that it is VERY similar to an old Twilight Zone about a 6 year old with similar powers called, "It's A Good Life" (written by TOS "Mirror Mirror" writer Jerome Bixby). Although that one didn't end quite as well for its characters...

And to those who knock the Uhura/Spock romance in ST09? Check out Uhura serenading Spock in the rec room ("His devil ears and devil eyes... could rip your heart from you"). Even Spock smiles at her teasing of him. Oh, just get a ROOM you two.... :P

Edited by Sehlat Vie

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Glad I could help you relive the episode! Definitely a good one.

Charlie X does make a return in the fan film Star Trek: Of Gods and Men if anyone was interested. Same actor I believe.

And yes, if the next episode Uhura and Spock make out? My head will explode!

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Glad I could help you relive the episode! Definitely a good one.

Charlie X does make a return in the fan film Star Trek: Of Gods and Men if anyone was interested. Same actor I believe.

And yes, if the next episode Uhura and Spock make out? My head will explode!

I saw OGAM a couple years ago; very impressive for a fan film. Although the actor playing Charlie wasn't Robert Walker Jr (that was William Wellman Jr.; although he had more than a reasonable resemblance to RWJ).

As for Uhura/Spock? I hear you. After her mock serenade of him, I just wanted to say, "Oh get a ROOM, you two...." :P

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Glad I could help you relive the episode! Definitely a good one.

Charlie X does make a return in the fan film Star Trek: Of Gods and Men if anyone was interested. Same actor I believe.

And yes, if the next episode Uhura and Spock make out? My head will explode!

I saw OGAM a couple years ago; very impressive for a fan film. Although the actor playing Charlie wasn't Robert Walker Jr (that was William Wellman Jr.; although he had more than a reasonable resemblance to RWJ).

As for Uhura/Spock? I hear you. After her mock serenade of him, I just wanted to say, "Oh get a ROOM, you two...." :P

Whoops. Kind of looked the same (just considerably older).

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Glad I could help you relive the episode! Definitely a good one.

Charlie X does make a return in the fan film Star Trek: Of Gods and Men if anyone was interested. Same actor I believe.

And yes, if the next episode Uhura and Spock make out? My head will explode!

I saw OGAM a couple years ago; very impressive for a fan film. Although the actor playing Charlie wasn't Robert Walker Jr (that was William Wellman Jr.; although he had more than a reasonable resemblance to RWJ).

As for Uhura/Spock? I hear you. After her mock serenade of him, I just wanted to say, "Oh get a ROOM, you two...." :P

Whoops. Kind of looked the same (just considerably older).

The older Charlie Evans was well cast; he very much looked like RWJ. Easy mistake.

Only reason I knew it wasn't him was because I saw RWJ in person at a ST convention in Pasadena about 10 years ago and he looks a bit different than William Wellman Jr.; but WWJ could easily pass for an older Charlie...

Edited by Sehlat Vie

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I re-watched this today and... I'm still so not impressed by it. It's one of my least favorite TOS episodes ever these days, actually. (Another case of 'I go against the general fandom opinion', I guess. Somehow it's even worse with TOS than it is with TNG.)

I just can't stand Charlie and his attitude. I'm not into the whole superpowefulteenager-trope. It's just... nothing that interests me. And I'm not a fan of Rand at all either, which... basically makes about 95% of this episode completely uninteresting to me. I simply could have done without this one. I avoid it whenever possible these days, actually. I'm surprised I managed to sit through it. It's just so completely bleeeeergh to have this whiny teenage brat running around and causing havoc mostly because he's in love. (Yawn? Yawn.)

There are a few tiny little interesting moments, such as Kirk in his tight red pants (hahahaha, just kidding, but to a Kirk fan these are probably VERY interesting) and the fact that the Enterprise appears to have "a large supply of entertainment tapes". I CAN GUESS WHAT KIND OF TAPES, KIRK

Other than that, however... sorry, but this episode just doesn't cut it for me, and I like it less and less. I only give it a 1/10. It's one of those episodes that I just want to ignore because pretty much nothing is of interest to me. I can't help it.

The favorite quote of the moment award for this one goes to Kirk, for his "Go to your quarters or I'll pick you up and carry you there." line.

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Kirk and Charlie Evans, ready for the workout (Bill with the shirt on, as he wanted to shoot the scene). A winning performance for young actor Robert Walker Jr, and even Bill is excellent in this episode. Hey its the first season, before the ssso-called over-actor syndrome !

1604558_732624563422341_1764289062_n.jpg

One of my favorites epiosdes ever.

Gus

Edited by GustavoLeao

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It breaks my heart, this one does.

The poor kid has NO experience with his own kind. Not to mention a bad case of the hormones (and godlike powers, too...). The hormones alone are enough to screw with most teenagers.... :S

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It breaks my heart, this one does.

The poor kid has NO experience with his own kind. Not to mention a bad case of the hormones (and godlike powers, too...). The hormones alone are enough to screw with most teenagers.... :S

Yeah, especially the end sequence. All he wanted was approval and to be wanted. But his lack of experience played against him in a macabre way.

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It breaks my heart, this one does.

The poor kid has NO experience with his own kind. Not to mention a bad case of the hormones (and godlike powers, too...). The hormones alone are enough to screw with most teenagers.... :S

Yeah, especially the end sequence. All he wanted was approval and to be wanted. But his lack of experience played against him in a macabre way.

I see Charlie as victim rather than omnipotent monster/brat. He had no fellow humans by which to gauge his reactions and feelings... it's no wonder he grew up without normal, natural empathy for those who suffer by his actions. This also happens with autistic and Asperger's children (my own god son, for one) and we don't ship them off to live with disembodied aliens....

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I guess I just lack the reference, I never had much of a problem with hormones when I was a teenager (I had other things to worry about), it's nothing I can relate to very well. Add to that the fact that I can't stand kids/teenagers, and there you go with why I dislike this episode. I would dislike it the same way if Charlie had been a "normal" teenager.

Speaking of which, I don't think Kirk had any other choice than to "ship him off". As that green cloud dude points out, Charlie would not have managed to live with humans. He wouldn't have refrained from using his powers and it would have ended in a 'us against him' fight. (What I don't understand is why these aliens didn't simply remove Charlie's powers. That would have enabled him to live among humans. He'd have had difficulties at first, yes, but he at least wouldn't have made people vanish anymore. These aliens seemed capable of quite a few things, and they GAVE him the powers, so, why can't they just remove them as well?)

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A very dramatic and poignant episode. Excellent performances of Robert Walker Jr and Bill Shatner. Even Grace Lee Whitney gave his best performance on the series;

I love the second season of TOS, but still, I am a very first season kind of guy. Shatner has not get into over-acting yet and there this sense of the mystery and the unknown.

As I said, I love this episode. This and "The City on the Edge of Forever" are highly emotional episodes for me.

"I want to stay..............stay............................stay........................stay............................."

charliexhd562.jpg

Robert Walker Jr today.

1530494_732953123389485_781291391_n.jpg

Gus

Edited by GustavoLeao

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The Twitter group TOSSatNight gets together Saturday evenings at 11 pm (PT) to watch and discuss a selected episode of TOS on Netflix, disc, or whatever Internet sources viewers have access to. We were watching Charlie X last night, and I asked if anyone knew what the "X" refers to in the title?  Apparently no one did.  Does anyone on Trekcore? 

This isn't one of my favorite episodes.  Charlie didn't ask for what happened to him, but the destructiveness he unleashes on the crew is hard to watch.  In truth though, every one of us has probably wished at one time or another that we had the momentary power to wreck havoc on someone who has inflicted hurt on us.  Really scary to see an adolescent with an unlimited ability to carry out that desire.  Even when someone tries to befriend him the consequences turn tragic.  Seeing lizard lady was bad enough but the poor crew woman wandering around blindly with her face removed was just too much.  Time for you to pack up and hit the road, Charlie!   :ohmy:

Listening to his final word "stay" echo through the bridge before he fades out is reminiscent of Apollo's "take me" on "Who Mourns For Adonais?".  The ending is indeed sad, but very necessary as the Thasians are correct in pointing out he would have destroyed them just as he did the Antares and the earth colony he was heading toward.  

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My guess (referring to the X question) is that it means unknown (like a formula/equation).   Charlie Evans is part Charlie and part "X" (other).  In this case, Thasian.

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The Twitter group TOSSatNight gets together Saturday evenings at 11 pm (PT) to watch and discuss a selected episode of TOS on Netflix, disc, or whatever Internet sources viewers have access to. We were watching Charlie X last night, and I asked if anyone knew what the "X" refers to in the title?  Apparently no one did.  Does anyone on Trekcore?

Ooh, that sounds like great fun!  How does one join this group?  (I have a Twitter account, but I almost never use it, so I'm a real novice at all things Twitter.)

 

We were watching Charlie X last night, and I asked if anyone knew what the "X" refers to in the title?  Apparently no one did.  Does anyone on Trekcore?

Yes, actually!  Marc Cushman talks about this in his chapter on "Charlie X" in These Are the Voyages.

Cushman reports that he asked Roddenberry why this episode is titled "Charlie X," given that the boy's name is Charles Evans.  He says that Gene Roddenberry told him in an interview, "You remember in the westerns, and someone would say, 'Make your mark here.'  And the prospector or ranch hand draws his 'X.'  And you understood he had no formal education."  

Westerns were extremely popular in the late 50's and early 60's, so at the time TOS was made, audiences would be familiar with the conventions of the western genre, and the idea that illiterate people drew an "X" to sign a contract or document was one that the audience would have understood.  Nowadays westerns are far less popular, and "X" is probably more familiar as the symbol of an unknown quantity in algebra.  But according to Roddenberry, that's not the "X" the title is referring to; that "X" is referring to the fact that Charlie has no formal education and doesn't know how to write.

Other trivia about the episode:

1.  Dorothy Fontana said that in her original version of the script, she'd focused primarily on Charlie's feeling out of place and not knowing how to behave, and it was Gene Roddenberry who added Charlie's raging hormones and his "crush" on Janice Rand.  In an interview with Marc Cushman, Fontana said, "Sex always got into Gene's work," and John D. F. Black agreed with that assessment.

Roddenberry said that when he was a teenaged boy, he felt as if he was the only one who was overwhelmed by sexual feelings that he didn't know what to do with, and he wanted to make sure that Charlie felt the same way, to reassure teenagers that they weren't the only ones who felt such things.  Of course, nowadays, people talk about teenagers' raging hormones all the time, but the world was very different fifty years ago.

2.  The chef who calls Kirk on the intercom from the ship's galley to tell him that there are real turkeys in the ovens was voiced by ... Gene Roddenberry.

 

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The Twitter group TOSSatNight gets together Saturday evenings at 11 pm (PT) to watch and discuss a selected episode of TOS on Netflix, disc, or whatever Internet sources viewers have access to. We were watching Charlie X last night, and I asked if anyone knew what the "X" refers to in the title?  Apparently no one did.  Does anyone on Trekcore?

Ooh, that sounds like great fun!  How does one join this group?  (I have a Twitter account, but I almost never use it, so I'm a real novice at all things Twitter.)

 

We were watching Charlie X last night, and I asked if anyone knew what the "X" refers to in the title?  Apparently no one did.  Does anyone on Trekcore?

Yes, actually!  Marc Cushman talks about this in his chapter on "Charlie X" in These Are the Voyages.

Cushman reports that he asked Roddenberry why this episode is titled "Charlie X," given that the boy's name is Charles Evans.  He says that Gene Roddenberry told him in an interview, "You remember in the westerns, and someone would say, 'Make your mark here.'  And the prospector or ranch hand draws his 'X.'  And you understood he had no formal education."  

Westerns were extremely popular in the late 50's and early 60's, so at the time TOS was made, audiences would be familiar with the conventions of the western genre, and the idea that illiterate people drew an "X" to sign a contract or document was one that the audience would have understood.  Nowadays westerns are far less popular, and "X" is probably more familiar as the symbol of an unknown quantity in algebra.  But according to Roddenberry, that's not the "X" the title is referring to; that "X" is referring to the fact that Charlie has no formal education and doesn't know how to write.

Other trivia about the episode:

1.  Dorothy Fontana said that in her original version of the script, she'd focused primarily on Charlie's feeling out of place and not knowing how to behave, and it was Gene Roddenberry who added Charlie's raging hormones and his "crush" on Janice Rand.  In an interview with Marc Cushman, Fontana said, "Sex always got into Gene's work," and John D. F. Black agreed with that assessment.

Roddenberry said that when he was a teenaged boy, he felt as if he was the only one who was overwhelmed by sexual feelings that he didn't know what to do with, and he wanted to make sure that Charlie felt the same way, to reassure teenagers that they weren't the only ones who felt such things.  Of course, nowadays, people talk about teenagers' raging hormones all the time, but the world was very different fifty years ago.

2.  The chef who calls Kirk on the intercom from the ship's galley to tell him that there are real turkeys in the ovens was voiced by ... Gene Roddenberry.

 

^
And you know, I just read that book a couple months ago, and I forgot that!    * smacks forehead! *   Duh, right?  It's so obvious when you think about it.

Thanks for providing that, Corylea.  I completely forgot that passage, since I'm trying so hard to finish all three of the TATV books; I'm almost done with #2 now, but life has this nasty habit of interfering with my book reading... :laugh:

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We were watching Charlie X last night, and I asked if anyone knew what the "X" refers to in the title?  Apparently no one did.  Does anyone on Trekcore?

Yes, actually!  Marc Cushman talks about this in his chapter on "Charlie X" in These Are the Voyages.

Cushman reports that he asked Roddenberry why this episode is titled "Charlie X," given that the boy's name is Charles Evans.  He says that Gene Roddenberry told him in an interview, "You remember in the westerns, and someone would say, 'Make your mark here.'  And the prospector or ranch hand draws his 'X.'  And you understood he had no formal education."  

Westerns were extremely popular in the late 50's and early 60's, so at the time TOS was made, audiences would be familiar with the conventions of the western genre, and the idea that illiterate people drew an "X" to sign a contract or document was one that the audience would have understood.  Nowadays westerns are far less popular, and "X" is probably more familiar as the symbol of an unknown quantity in algebra.  But according to Roddenberry, that's not the "X" the title is referring to; that "X" is referring to the fact that Charlie has no formal education and doesn't know how to write.

^
And you know, I just read that book a couple months ago, and I forgot that!    * smacks forehead! *   Duh, right?  It's so obvious when you think about it.

Thanks for providing that, Corylea.  I completely forgot that passage, since I'm trying so hard to finish all three of the TATV books; I'm almost done with #2 now, but life has this nasty habit of interfering with my book reading... :laugh:

Well, I would have forgotten it, myself, except that "Charlie X" is the next episode I need to do for my "Episode Epilogues" series, so I was just re-reading Cushman's chapter on it the other day.  I have plenty of senior moments, myself, so no need to feel embarrassed! ;)

I love this little anecdote, too, because it illustrates how there are things even intelligent and thoughtful people might fail to get out of the episodes, just because the times we live in have changed so much from the time in which TOS was made.  You can get Shakespeare and Jane Austen and other classics in annotated format, which explains the cultural context that we no longer share with the writer.  We're gonna need an annotated TOS before too many more decades have passed.

Oh, my, did I just compare TOS to Shakespeare?  I guess I did! :P

 

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We were watching Charlie X last night, and I asked if anyone knew what the "X" refers to in the title?  Apparently no one did.  Does anyone on Trekcore?

Yes, actually!  Marc Cushman talks about this in his chapter on "Charlie X" in These Are the Voyages.

Cushman reports that he asked Roddenberry why this episode is titled "Charlie X," given that the boy's name is Charles Evans.  He says that Gene Roddenberry told him in an interview, "You remember in the westerns, and someone would say, 'Make your mark here.'  And the prospector or ranch hand draws his 'X.'  And you understood he had no formal education."  

Westerns were extremely popular in the late 50's and early 60's, so at the time TOS was made, audiences would be familiar with the conventions of the western genre, and the idea that illiterate people drew an "X" to sign a contract or document was one that the audience would have understood.  Nowadays westerns are far less popular, and "X" is probably more familiar as the symbol of an unknown quantity in algebra.  But according to Roddenberry, that's not the "X" the title is referring to; that "X" is referring to the fact that Charlie has no formal education and doesn't know how to write.

^
And you know, I just read that book a couple months ago, and I forgot that!    * smacks forehead! *   Duh, right?  It's so obvious when you think about it.

Thanks for providing that, Corylea.  I completely forgot that passage, since I'm trying so hard to finish all three of the TATV books; I'm almost done with #2 now, but life has this nasty habit of interfering with my book reading... :laugh:

Well, I would have forgotten it, myself, except that "Charlie X" is the next episode I need to do for my "Episode Epilogues" series, so I was just re-reading Cushman's chapter on it the other day.  I have plenty of senior moments, myself, so no need to feel embarrassed! ;)

I love this little anecdote, too, because it illustrates how there are things even intelligent and thoughtful people might fail to get out of the episodes, just because the times we live in have changed so much from the time in which TOS was made.  You can get Shakespeare and Jane Austen and other classics in annotated format, which explains the cultural context that we no longer share with the writer.  We're gonna need an annotated TOS before too many more decades have passed.

Oh, my, did I just compare TOS to Shakespeare?  I guess I did! :P

I'm pretty sure that in 500 years, you'll see people in tights performing "Trouble With Tribbles" onstage... :laugh:

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I love this little anecdote, too, because it illustrates how there are things even intelligent and thoughtful people might fail to get out of the episodes, just because the times we live in have changed so much from the time in which TOS was made.  You can get Shakespeare and Jane Austen and other classics in annotated format, which explains the cultural context that we no longer share with the writer.  We're gonna need an annotated TOS before too many more decades have passed.

Oh, my, did I just compare TOS to Shakespeare?  I guess I did! :P

I'm pretty sure that in 500 years, you'll see people in tights performing "Trouble With Tribbles" onstage... :laugh:

Oh, god, what a mental image that conjures up!  I think I have to go sit down and fan myself, now. :loopy:

 

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