Smellincoffee

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    18
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About Smellincoffee

  • Rank
    The Phoenix

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Marital Status
  • Favorite Trek Movie
    The Undiscovered Country
  • Favorite Trek Captain
    Benjamin Sisko
  • Favorite Trek Series
    Deep Space Nine
  1. I just finished The Patrian Transgression, in which Kirk and company confront a planet with secret police who read minds. I found it fairly enjoyable; the author had a good grasp on the characters, delivered a few good lines of dialogue, and kept things exciting. ST VOY explored this territory a bit, as I recall, but Kirk's crew were never as endangered as Torres.s
  2. Would anyone consider Night of the Living Trekkies a 'Trek' novel? ;-) It's about a zombie outbreak at a Star Trek convention, I think.
  3. Miles O'Brien, Kira Nerys, and the Sisko
  4. The first Trek DVD I purchased was in 2005, and the only place selling them local was Wal-mart, annnd the thing they were selling was season four of ENT. I paid $100 for it....and then discovered Amazon.The rest have been purchased either on sale, or used. I've been waiting for years to catch copies of VOY and ENT under $20, but I don't think that's happening.
  5. "Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ye" and "Donald, Where's Your Troosers?", the Irish Rovers
  6. I've yet to see seasons 2 and 3 of Enterprise. (I only own seasons 1 and 4. I'll get to the rest, after seasons...2,3, 5, and 7 of Voyager. No, there is no logic to my DVD acquisitions,,other than what's selling cheap. :p)
  7. Never heard of those ... what is it all about? Symphony of Science takes audio recordings from scientists (Carl Sagan, Richard Dawkins, Brian Cox, Neil deGrasse Tyson, many others) and science boosters like Bill Nye and Isaac Asimov, plays with them in autotune, and sets them to music. The first was "A Glorious Dawn", largely a tribute to Carl Sagan's optimistic view of humanity's future in space. The producer, melodysheep, has created songs about the brain, dinosaurs, reason, DNA, evolution, climate change, black holes -- it's fairly incredible. They're all on YouTube. Unfortunately Carl Sagan doesn't appear as much in the later ones. Sounds right up my alley... My favorite outside of Sagan's is "The Poetry of Reality", especially the intro.
  8. I'm indeed shocked you hadn't seen those yet, and I'm not even a cinema buff. How did you like them? Very much to both! Most of the appeal for Back to the Future was the 'retro' feel; I grew up in the late eighties and nineties, so the clothing and music took me back. Christopher Lloyd is always fun to watch, too. The Matrix was awesome on manylevels, though I don't know if I want to try the next two movies. Fans seem to loathe them! Earlier this year I watched 2001: A Space Odyssey....for the first time. And last year? The Superman movies. I think I'm running out of bombshells, though. I envy you! You still have a lot of the great stuff ahead of you! "Back to the Future" (especially the first movie) was one of the huge sf-movie-loves of my childhood: I was 9 years old, it was summer holiday so no school, and my parents were renovating the living room, so the tv set was parked in my room. A friend's older sister had provided me with a VHS recording of "Back to the Future" and during one summer night, I would watch that movie three times in a row. Was especially amazed by all the details that changed (i.e. did you notice that the mall was called "Three Pines Mall" before Marty went back in time, but because he destroyed one of the pines, it was then called "Two Pines Mall" after his return?). Yeah, the first Matrix is great, but the two sequels are mediocre. Yet I don't hate them, they're still fun entertainment IMO. Just nowhere near the brilliance of the first movie. Another 'classic' I haven't read is...Jaws. I did notice the sign changing, but I'd been slightly spoiled on that point. The problem with not watching popular movies is that if they're popular enough, lines and scenes get talked about, so at the end when Doc says "Roads?", my friend and I were able to say it with them: "...where we're going, we don't NEED roads." One thing I noticed, watching the films back to back, was that Marty's girlfriend changes from a brunette to a blonde. A different actor, I can understand, but one who looks nothing like her?!
  9. Never heard of those ... what is it all about? Symphony of Science takes audio recordings from scientists (Carl Sagan, Richard Dawkins, Brian Cox, Neil deGrasse Tyson, many others) and science boosters like Bill Nye and Isaac Asimov, plays with them in autotune, and sets them to music. The first was "A Glorious Dawn", largely a tribute to Carl Sagan's optimistic view of humanity's future in space. The producer, melodysheep, has created songs about the brain, dinosaurs, reason, DNA, evolution, climate change, black holes -- it's fairly incredible. They're all on YouTube. Unfortunately Carl Sagan doesn't appear as much in the later ones.
  10. I'm indeed shocked you hadn't seen those yet, and I'm not even a cinema buff. How did you like them? Very much to both! Most of the appeal for Back to the Future was the 'retro' feel; I grew up in the late eighties and nineties, so the clothing and music took me back. Christopher Lloyd is always fun to watch, too. The Matrix was awesome on manylevels, though I don't know if I want to try the next two movies. Fans seem to loathe them! Earlier this year I watched 2001: A Space Odyssey....for the first time. And last year? The Superman movies. I think I'm running out of bombshells, though.
  11. Oh, it's been quite a while since I read it, but yes, I think that's it. If the Yorktown was the museum ship, then yes. I just remember how much I was looking forward to a story of Spock, Bones and Scotty in the 24th century, and how disappointing the novel then turned out to be. Hm ok ... in Germany, "Jan" is a common name, but you pronounce it like "Yan". I guessed something about that doesn't sound right when it's an American name.. It may depend on where in the United States he is from. Some areas are so densely settled with German and other northern countries that the pronunciation is closer to the European original. I'm from the deep South, though, where 'Celts' are more predominant. My local area is littered with towns named Berlin and Hamburg, though!
  12. Alternatively, a dolphin and a P-51 mustang. In their respective elements, of course.
  13. Last weekend I watched The Matrix for the first time; this weekend a friend and I watched Back to the Future parts I and II for the first time. I have a few older friends who are cinema buffs, and the amount of movies I haven't watched is a constant shock to them.
  14. Deep Space Nine was the only show I was able to watch as it aired, so I have a childhood loyalty to it. My parents didn't like television when I was growing up, so most of my early viewing came from watching people's VHS tapes, or catching something of Trek on a motel TV set. There was a brief couple of years when a cousin of mine lived with us and let me watch his TV, though, hence my seeing DS9 live. Otherwise, I got most of my Trek knowledge from...the books! Least favorite is much easier -- Enterprise. I can enjoy it, but it's in a different neighborhood altogether from the rest.
  15. Yes, Michael Jan Friedman must be the one author who is both capable of really outstanding novels ("Shadows on the Sun" must be one of my favorite novels ever! -- and was my favorite McCoy novel for quite a while, before David George III wrote his epic "Crucible: McCoy", which IMO is at least one entire league better than all other Trek novels I ever read), and mediocre or even sub-standard stuff. Agreed that "Saratoga" is a blatant rip-off of "Reunion". But still, it's not among my least favorites. Despite the *blatant* lack of originality, it's still written in an entertaining manner and the characters are not off at all. Usually, that's really all I ask from a Trek novel. Most of Friedman's stuff is good, but not outstanding IMO -- "Reunion" and the other Stargazer stuff, his TOS novels about Kirk's replicant from "WHat Are Little Girls Made of?" or the pre-story to Kirk and his relation to David Marcus, or his TNG novel about that gem chase Riker gets involved in. Usually, he has a knack for the characters, IMO. They're just like I know them. Another one that's sub-standard IMO is "Crossover". That was all the more disappointing, as a novel featuring all surviving TOS characters in the 24th century (Spock, Bones and Scotty) should have been a blast. (Btw: How do you pronounce his second name Jan? Is it "ee-an" or actually "Jan" with a "j" as in "ninja"? Or "yan"?) Wasn't Crossover the one where Scotty steals the Yorktown to take it into Romulan space to rescue Spock? I remember reading that one as a teenager and thinking, "...this is a bit of a stretch". Personally, I pronounce it with the firm J, like jam, but for the longest time I referred to the "Care-i-be-an" sea, so my track recording at guessing is not good. I've never seen a TV interview with him that might shed some light on the subject.