Sehlat Vie

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Everything posted by Sehlat Vie

  1. One week till WonderCon in Anaheim; to everyone on this site: "I promise a report of great detail and accuracy..."

  2. I'm going with a friend of mine this Sunday; Mrs Vie doesn't do horror. My friend and I were both on the fence about it, so two 'on-the-fencers' make one supporter. I'm keeping my expectations somewhat low; much as I did with "Passengers" (which was pretty fun & entertaining, if not particularly challenging). I'm anticipating a similar experience with "Life." If it's bad, well...c'est la vie.
  3. Maybe more dead were accounted for later on...? At any rate, they can't perfectly sync a fictitious history with the real thing, but I give Greg Cox serious kudos for even making the attempt; as well as producing a couple of really entertaining books on the subject in the process...
  4. I was on the fence with this one, but I'm leaning towards yes...
  5. Awww, too kind... ^ And those stories speak to those who love to 'bridge the divides' as you say; to imagine what is out there, and getting into alien mindsets. And it's also a nice tool for better understanding ourselves as well.
  6. ^ I loved "The Galaxy Being"; still my favorite episode of the classic "Outer Limits." The being's voice! Oh man. Still sends chills down my spine. Scared me as a little kid; fascinated me as a teen... I wonder if we ever will swap notes with an alien intelligence; I'd imagine that if ever crack the linguistic barrier (formidable challenge, as "The Arrival" ably illustrates), I think there will be overlaps, for sure; mortality, passage of time, etc. but the differences will be revelatory as well. How do they see the universe? How do they see planets, moons, comets, etc? Maybe they see it all as parts of the same thing (star stuff, as Sagan so famously coined). Or maybe they don't bother with mundane classifications at all. Maybe their science is intertwined with their art/culture in ways we can't conceive of with our 'earthbound' thinking (?). As my wife the art teacher would remind her students; art isn't just on a canvas or contained within a sculpture. It's in EVERYTHING. It's in architecture, in clothing, hairstyles, cars, phones, even in the shape of one's computer. Science informs and educates us, but I believe that art is the reason WHY we are. Art and culture give us meaning in a universe that couldn't care less. I don't know if life has a pre-assigned 'meaning' (as an atheist, I'm doubtful) but that doesn't mean that our lives are meaningless; we GIVE things meaning. We give things cultural significance. We give them beauty and relevance to ourselves. We are our own answer to that biggest question, IMHO. Whether we choose to call an object an asteroid a planet or not is immaterial really; the object will be what it always was, regardless. Our labeling of it has meaning to us and that is important. If and when we ever do compare notes with an alien culture someday, I'd be wildly curious to see what meanings they assign to the universe...
  7. Those soccer nerd caps are so distinctly different from his being a Shakespeare nerd caps...
  8. I don't think I'll 'keep' anywhere near as well as Sir Patrick though....
  9. As I recall, he was a bit busy with the Klingons around that time... Maybe Sisko, because of his experiences at Wolf 359 was dismissed by Starfleet command; and since Worf was on the outs with the Klingons anyway, it made more sense for them to swap jobs on that one.
  10. Sounds like you've been watching the same news that I have. But yes, I agree that certain terms have cultural significance and tradition and shouldn't be so easily dismissed for the next shiny thing that comes along. As a science geek, I'm also partial to the idea that new information supplants old information when it is disproven or discredited, but this is (as you say) more about language than astronomy. A thing will still be a thing no matter what one calls it, right? I also wonder how other intelligences in our universe (who are capable of grasping astronomy) classify their own sub stellar bodies? Maybe it's a classification system that we have NO inkling of whatsoever; maybe they see everything less than a sun as a 'moon' of a star (?). Who knows. We humans evolved from our ancient idea of an Earth-centric universe; maybe other beings didn't start off on this wrong foot (assuming they have feet?). One can only wonder what classifications (if any) are used by other beings out in the universe....
  11. Tomah-to, tomato... I thought it looked sophisticated. The Ent-E interiors (all of them) never looked better; and the Romulan senate chamber was a beautiful set. I don't know about Logan's original script, as I've not read it, but what ended up on the screen was not his best work (this is the same guy who wrote the superlative Bond film "Skyfall").
  12. I just hope that all of my friends still have that kind of affection for me when I'm in my 70s.
  13. In our minds, anything's possible... no matter how bat-s#!t crazy.
  14. Maybe it's just my expectation level, but I go into a ST movie hoping for a movie first. INS felt very un-cinematic. NEM was a bad script, but it least it looked nice, with great visual panache, and a beautiful color palette. INS just had the feeling of a widescreen S7 episode, and a mediocre one at that. If my eyes are going to be fixed on a screen for several hours, the movie should at least look and feel vaguely cinematic. The Abramsverse ST movies, for all their faults, do this for me. Even STID, which I don't like, looked terrific. Movies are the one-night stands compared to the steady relationship that is a television show. The one-night stand doesn't necessarily have to look great the morning after, but at least you'll have a nice time for one night...
  15. But--but--the Mondasian cybermen are back! Maybe a really big chunk of Mondas survived...
  16. Sorry but I just loathe that movie; it's like a really bad S7 two-parter. Like "Gambit: The Movie." When I go to the movies, I want a movie; not a bad episode that I would barely watch at home, let alone pay to see. ST09, for all its flaws, FELT like a movie. Ditto FC (flaws and all). INS does not. It barely registers as an episode.
  17. Those two guys from Caltech, Konstantin Batygiri (sp?) and Mike Brown, claimed last year to have discovered the approximate spot Planet X (for lack of a better word) beyond Neptune's orbit, but that discovery still has yet to be visually confirmed. However it looks cautiously promising. Ironically it was the study of perturbations in Neptune's orbit back in 1930 that led 24 year old Clyde Tombaugh to the discovery of Pluto. I'm still waiting for them to locate Mondas...
  18. Raining again!  Nice... so nice to see flowers and greenery in bloom along the roadsides again. 

  19. Again, not a big fan of the anime; I liked the live-action movie, but of the two of us (my wife and I) she's the anime fan, not me. Part of the thrill of the movie was seeing the story brought into the 'real' three-dimensional world, and not just seeing another Japanese anime. I don't hate anime per se (and I loved "Spirited Away") but I'm generally indifferent to it, to be honest....
  20. I love the 2010 live-action "Space Battleship Yamato" movie and I'm not a fan of the source material. I own the movie on blu ray. It's amazing.
  21. ^ That would also include thousands of as yet unknown KBOs, asteroids, and even comet nuclei. The orbit also had to be defined as one that would 'sweep' other objects out of its path (much in the way that smaller objects seem to 'fall' into the gravity wells of larger worlds). Ceres fails to do this, as it shares its obit with many other objects, hence its minor/dwarf status. ^ I may be alone on this one, but I still think there could (should) be a 'one-name-fits-all' bucket for this. Minor and major just seems so arbitrary; they haven't even fully established a firm mass/circumference threshold for minor to major designation yet; currently it varies from asteroids to KBOs. Good question. I think for the moon's status to be upgraded, it would have to show gravitational equanimity of some kind. Right now, the Earth has clear gravitational advantage over the moon, which forces it into a tidally-locked orbit. Hate to use a fictional example (but this IS a sci-fi forum... hehe) but the TV show "Caprica" illustrated how the planet Gemenon shared a dual planet orbit with Caprica. There was also the 1969 British film, "Journey to the Far Side of the Sun" (aka "Doppelgänger") whose central idea was that a parallel 'mirror' Earth (much like ST's mirror universe) actually shared our Earth's orbit but was constantly hidden from us by the sun and our own relative position to the alternate Earth. This is scientific poppycock of course (its gravitational influence on us and the sun would've been detected LONG beforehand), but it's not impossible to imagine dual planets sharing a 'Goldilocks' orbit in another solar system somewhere...
  22. Pretty much agree, but for me I would say that ST Beyond is a great TOS-style film, and FC is a great TNG film; each are great ST movies, but in their own respective categories...
  23. I'd almost call it a draw; I loved TUC, GEN and FC. But I also thought that ST09 was a nice shot in the arm for the franchise; a fresh infusion of energy it kind of needed at the time. And ST Beyond was really good in recapturing the spirit of TOS. Though I agree that STID was a mess. A beautifully photographed mess (arguably one of the best-looking ST movies ever), but still a mess...